Latest & greatest articles for cannabis

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Top results for cannabis

21. Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Regular Use and Cognitive Functioning

current understanding of this issue. Other reports in this series address the link between chronic cannabis use and mental health, the effects of maternal cannabis use during pregnancy, cannabis use and driving, the respiratory effects of cannabis use and the medical use of cannabis and cannabinoids. This series is intended for a broad audience, including health professionals, policy makers and researchers. 1 62 Background Cannabis, also referred to as marijuana, is the second most widely used (...) that are often used interchangeably with regular use include frequent use, chronic use and long-term use. Heavy use, by contrast, typically refers to daily or more frequent use, and can be a sign of dependence and cannabis use disorder. Cannabis is a greenish or brownish material consisting of the dried flowering, fruiting tops and leaves of the cannabis plant, Cannabis sativa. Hashish or cannabis resin is the dried brown or black resinous secretion of the flowering tops of the cannabis plant. Cannabis can

2019 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

22. Pharmacotherapy for the Treatment of Cannabis Use Disorder

of pharmacotherapies for CUD, and many of the existing studies are hampered by poor methodological quality or reporting. There is moderate strength evidence that antidepressants do not reduce cannabis use or improve treatment retention, and may be associated with lower rates of abstinence. There also is low to moderate strength of evidence that buspirone, and N-acetylcysteine do not improve outcomes. Although investigators found that cannabinoids do not improve retention, increase rates of abstinence, or reduce (...) (i.e., divalproex, lithium), atomoxetine, cannabinoids, anticonvulsants (i.e., topiramate, gabapentin), N-acetylcysteine, arepitant, and oxytocin. Antidepressants were the most widely studied drug class. Given increasing access to and use of cannabis in the general population (including Veterans), along with the high prevalence of cannabis use disorder among current cannabis users, there is an urgent need for more research to identify effective pharmacologic treatments. Implications Findings

2019 Veterans Affairs - R&D

23. Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Regular Use and Cognitive Functioning

current understanding of this issue. Other reports in this series address the link between chronic cannabis use and mental health, the effects of maternal cannabis use during pregnancy, cannabis use and driving, the respiratory effects of cannabis use and the medical use of cannabis and cannabinoids. This series is intended for a broad audience, including health professionals, policy makers and researchers. 1 62 Background Cannabis, also referred to as marijuana, is the second most widely used (...) that are often used interchangeably with regular use include frequent use, chronic use and long-term use. Heavy use, by contrast, typically refers to daily or more frequent use, and can be a sign of dependence and cannabis use disorder. Cannabis is a greenish or brownish material consisting of the dried flowering, fruiting tops and leaves of the cannabis plant, Cannabis sativa. Hashish or cannabis resin is the dried brown or black resinous secretion of the flowering tops of the cannabis plant. Cannabis can

2019 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

24. Acute Illness Associated With Cannabis Use, by Route of Exposure: An Observational Study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

to be for cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome (18.0% vs. 8.4%), and visits attributable to edible cannabis were more likely to be due to acute psychiatric symptoms (18.0% vs. 10.9%), intoxication (48% vs. 28%), and cardiovascular symptoms (8.0% vs. 3.1%). Edible products accounted for 10.7% of cannabis-attributable visits between 2014 and 2016 but represented only 0.32% of total cannabis sales in Colorado (in kilograms of tetrahydrocannabinol) in that period.Retrospective study design, single academic center, self (...) Acute Illness Associated With Cannabis Use, by Route of Exposure: An Observational Study. Little is known about the relative harms of edible and inhalable cannabis products.To describe and compare adult emergency department (ED) visits related to edible and inhaled cannabis exposure.Chart review of ED visits between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2016.A large urban academic hospital in Colorado.Adults with ED visits with a cannabis-related International Classification of Diseases, Ninth or 10th

2019 Annals of Internal Medicine

25. An experimental randomized study on the analgesic effects of pharmaceutical-grade cannabis in chronic pain patients with fibromyalgia Full Text available with Trip Pro

An experimental randomized study on the analgesic effects of pharmaceutical-grade cannabis in chronic pain patients with fibromyalgia In this experimental randomized placebo-controlled 4-way crossover trial, we explored the analgesic effects of inhaled pharmaceutical-grade cannabis in 20 chronic pain patients with fibromyalgia. We tested 4 different cannabis varieties with exact knowledge on their [INCREMENT]-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) content: Bedrocan (22.4-mg THC, <1-mg (...) than placebo on spontaneous or electrical pain responses, although more subjects receiving Bediol displayed a 30% decrease in pain scores compared to placebo (90% vs 55% of patients, P = 0.01), with spontaneous pain scores correlating with the magnitude of drug high (ρ = -0.5, P < 0.001). Cannabis varieties containing THC caused a significant increase in pressure pain threshold relative to placebo (P < 0.01). Cannabidiol inhalation increased THC plasma concentrations but diminished THC-induced

2019 EvidenceUpdates

26. Cannabis

. Front Pharmacol 2018;9:916. 2. Government of Canada. Canadian T obacco Alcohol and Drugs (CTADS): 2015 sum- mary. (Accessed September 25, 2018). 3. Health Canada. Information for Health Care Professionals: Cannabis (marihuana, marijuana) and the cannabinoids. (Accessed September 25, 2018). 4. Storr MA, Yüce B, Andrews CN, et al. The role of the endocannabinoid system in the pathophysiology and treatment of irritable bowel syndrome. Neurogastroenterol Motil 2008;20(8):857–68. 5. Abbott Laboratories (...) @ucalgary.ca Keywords: Cannabis; Hepatic disorders; Gastroenterological disorders; Position statement Medical cannabinoid products are widely used in Canada to treat medical symptoms of all kinds, and gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are among the most commonly cited reasons for use (1). Cannabis is also widely used recreationally (2), and legal- ization of recreational use has occurred in Canada. Currently, cannabis is not an approved therapeutic product in Canada. However, health care practitioners may

2018 Canadian Association of Gastroenterology

27. Blazing Through the Evidence on THC Versus CBD Combinations in Medical Cannabinoids

Blazing Through the Evidence on THC Versus CBD Combinations in Medical Cannabinoids Tools for Practice is proudly sponsored by the Alberta College of Family Physicians (ACFP). ACFP is a provincial, professional voluntary organization, representing more than 4,800 family physicians, family medicine residents, and medical students in Alberta. Established over sixty years ago, the ACFP strives for excellence in family practice through advocacy, continuing medical education and primary care (...) research. www.acfp.ca April 23, 2018 Blazing Through the Evidence on THC Versus CBD Combinations in Medical Cannabinoids. Clinical Question: Do tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), cannabidiol (CBD), or the THC/CBD combination yield differing benefits or harms? Bottom Line: From four randomized controlled trials (RCT), one found THC/CBD superior to THC but this was inconsistent within study and with other studies. Adverse events are prevalent in THC/CBD and individual components. While some early poor-quality

2018 Tools for Practice

28. Cannabinoids for Chronic Pain

Cannabinoids for Chronic Pain Cannabinoids for Chronic Pain November 2018 Mailing Address: Therapeutics Initiative The University of British Columbia Department of Anesthesiology, Pharmacology & Therapeutics 2176 Health Sciences Mall Vancouver, BC Canada V6T 1Z3 Tel.: 604 822 0700 Fax: 604 822 0701 E-mail: info@ti.ubc.ca www.ti.ubc.ca 115 C anada’s parliament legalized the recreational use of herbal cannabis (marijuana) in October 2018. The well-publicized limitations of clinical re- search (...) marijuana, we need to learn about it, be open-minded, and above all, be non-judgmental. Otherwise, our patients will seek out other, less reliable sources of information; they will con- tinue to use it, they just won’t tell us, and there will be that much less trust and strength in our doctor-patient relationship.” 4 This Therapeutics Letter provides a brief overview of pharmaceutical cannabinoids and herbal cannabis and the best available evidence for their use in the manage- ment of chronic pain

2018 Therapeutics Letter

29. Cannabis for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cannabis for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Cannabis and cannabinoids are often promoted as treatment for many illnesses and are widely used among patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). Few studies have evaluated the use of these agents in UC. Further, cannabis has potential for adverse events and the long-term consequences of cannabis and cannabinoid use in UC are unknown.To assess the efficacy and safety of cannabis and cannabinoids for the treatment of patients with UC.We searched (...) MEDLINE, Embase, WHO ICTRP, AMED, PsychINFO, the Cochrane IBD Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, ClinicalTrials.Gov and the European Clinical Trials Register from inception to 2 January 2018. Conference abstracts and references were searched to identify additional studies.Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing any form or dose of cannabis or its cannabinoid derivatives (natural or synthetic) to placebo or an active therapy for adults (> 18 years) with UC were included.Two authors

2018 Cochrane

30. Cannabis for the treatment of Crohn's disease. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cannabis for the treatment of Crohn's disease. Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic immune-mediated condition of transmural inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract, associated with significant morbidity and decreased quality of life. The endocannabinoid system provides a potential therapeutic target for cannabis and cannabinoids and animal models have shown benefit in decreasing inflammation. However, there is also evidence to suggest transient adverse events such as weakness, dizziness (...) and diarrhea, and an increased risk of surgery in people with CD who use cannabis.The objectives were to assess the efficacy and safety of cannabis and cannabinoids for induction and maintenance of remission in people with CD.We searched MEDLINE, Embase, AMED, PsychINFO, the Cochrane IBD Group Specialized Register, CENTRAL, ClinicalTrials.Gov, and the European Clinical Trials Register up to 17 October 2018. We searched conference abstracts, references and we also contacted researchers in this field

2018 Cochrane

31. An Outbreak of Synthetic Cannabinoid-Associated Coagulopathy in Illinois. Full Text available with Trip Pro

An Outbreak of Synthetic Cannabinoid-Associated Coagulopathy in Illinois. In March and April 2018, more than 150 patients presented to hospitals in Illinois with coagulopathy and bleeding diathesis. Area physicians and public health organizations identified an association between coagulopathy and synthetic cannabinoid use. Preliminary tests of patient serum samples and drug samples revealed that brodifacoum, an anticoagulant, was the likely adulterant.We reviewed physician-reported data from (...) patients admitted to Saint Francis Medical Center in Peoria, Illinois, between March 28 and April 21, 2018, and included in a case series adult patients who met the criteria used to diagnose synthetic cannabinoid-associated coagulopathy. A confirmatory anticoagulant poisoning panel was ordered at the discretion of the treating physician.A total of 34 patients were identified as having synthetic cannabinoid-associated coagulopathy during 45 hospitalizations. Confirmatory anticoagulant testing

2018 NEJM

32. Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Maternal Cannabis Use during Pregnancy ? An Update

., Sambamoorthi, U., Taylor, P ., Richardson, G., Robles, N., Jhon, Y., . . . & Jasperse, D. (1991). Prenatal marijuana use and neonatal outcome. Neurotoxicology and Teratology, 13(3), 329–334. 10 Clearing the Smoke on Cannabis: Maternal Cannabis Use during Pregnancyde Oliveira Silveira, G., Loddi, S., de Oliveira, C.D.R., Zucoloto, A.D., Fruchtengarten, L.V.G., & Yonamine, M. (2017). Headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography — mass spectrometry for determination of cannabinoids in human (...) , cannabis (also referred to as marijuana) is the most widely used psychoactive substance in Canada. According to the 2015 Canadian Tobacco, Alcohol and Drugs Survey (CTADS), 12.3% of Canadians aged 15 years and older reported using cannabis at least once in 2015 (Statistics Canada, 2016a), an increase from 10.6% in 2013. The use of cannabis is generally more prevalent among young people, with 20.6% of youth aged 15 to 19 and 29.7% of young adults aged 20 to 24 reporting past-year use in 2015

2018 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

33. Growing at Home: Health and Safety Concerns for Personal Cannabis Cultivation

hazards. These risks may be present during cannabis cultivation, harvesting, and han- dling, and as a result there may be concomitant existence of each of these types of risks. Multiple intervention tactics may then be required within the same category of risk and a For the purposes of this paper, we use the regulatory definition of a pesticide, which is any substance used to kill, repel or control any organism that is considered a “pest” (e.g., weeds, insects, fungi, rodents, etc.).National (...) . In the US, poison centre and hospital admissions data have been used to understand the serious effects of cannabis intoxication on children (ranging from lethargy and ataxia to tachycardia, hypoventilation, coma, and seizure). 7 Although the form of cannabis ingested was unknown for most cases, data from 91 children revealed that ingestion of cannabis resin (e.g., hashish) was more common than edibles like cookies or candies, and that there were as many cases of intoxication due to ingesting a waste

2018 National Collaborating Centre for Environmental Health

34. Cannabis

of medical cannabis or cannabinoids for the treatment of insomnia disorder in adults? Key Message One non-randomized study was identified regarding 2017 13. Medical marijuana and the new herbalism, part 3: Cannabis does not cure breast cancer Medical marijuana and the new herbalism, part 3: Cannabis does not cure breast cancer – Respectful Insolence Search nationalgeographic.com Submit Posted by on Stefanie LaRue It’s been a while since I discussed medical marijuana , even though it’s a topic I’ve been (...) to the developing brain, leading to damage. Marijuana use in this age group is strongly linked 2017 4. Benefits and Harms of Cannabis in Chronic Pain or PTSD Management Briefs Search the HSR&D website Button to search HSRD ® Inside VA Budget and Performance Inside the News Room National Observances Special Events » » » » » Management Briefs Health Services Research & Development Management Brief no. 122 » Issue 122 February 2017 The systematic review reported on here is a product of the VA/HSR&D Quality

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

35. Pilot randomized trial of MOMENT, a motivational counseling-plus-ecological momentary intervention to reduce marijuana use in youth Full Text available with Trip Pro

Pilot randomized trial of MOMENT, a motivational counseling-plus-ecological momentary intervention to reduce marijuana use in youth Ecological momentary interventions (EMIs) influence behavior in real time, in real life. We evaluated trial feasibility and preliminary efficacy of MOMENT, a counseling-plus-EMI to reduce frequent marijuana use in youth in primary care.Primary care patients age 15-24 years using marijuana at least 3 times/week were randomized to MOMENT [motivational enhancement (...) therapy (MET)/smartphone-based momentary assessment/responsive motivational messaging] vs. No-messages (MET/momentary assessment) vs. MET-only. In MOMENT, two MET sessions were followed by 2 weeks of momentary assessment of marijuana use and factors related to use, with motivational messaging displayed after report of marijuana triggers, desire, use, and effort to avoid use. We evaluated study feasibility (recruitment, retention, and response rates; feedback survey responses) and explored intervention

2018 mHealth Controlled trial quality: uncertain

36. Risks and Benefits of Marijuana Use: A National Survey of U.S. Adults. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Risks and Benefits of Marijuana Use: A National Survey of U.S. Adults. Despite insufficient evidence regarding its risks and benefits, marijuana is increasingly available and is aggressively marketed to the public.To understand the public's views on the risks and benefits of marijuana use.Probability-based online survey.United States, 2017.16 280 U.S. adults.Proportion of U.S. adults who agreed with a statement.The response rate was 55.3% (n = 9003). Approximately 14.6% of U.S. adults reported (...) using marijuana in the past year. About 81% of U.S. adults believe marijuana has at least 1 benefit, whereas 17% believe it has no benefit. The most common benefit cited was pain management (66%), followed by treatment of diseases, such as epilepsy and multiple sclerosis (48%), and relief from anxiety, stress, and depression (47%). About 91% of U.S. adults believe marijuana has at least 1 risk, whereas 9% believe it has no risks. The most common risk identified by the public was legal problems (51.8

2018 Annals of Internal Medicine

37. Cannabis

cases, joints and blunts may be laced with other substances, such as cocaine. Cannabis can also be baked into foods and orally ingested. Commonly used street names for cannabis include “weed,” “pot,” “herb,” “ganja,” “grass,” “Mary Jane” and “reefer.” Illegal drugs, including cannabis, accounted for approximately $8.2 billion (about 20%) of the nearly $40 billion cost of substance abuse in Canada in 2002. 2 It is estimated that in 2017, Canadians spent around $5.7 billion on medical and non-medical (...) Cannabis www.ccsa.ca • www.ccdus.ca June 2018 Canadian Drug Summary Canadian Centre on Substance Use and Addiction • Centre canadien sur les dépendances et l’usage de substances Page 1 Cannabis Introduction Cannabis, more commonly called marijuana, is a tobacco-like greenish or brownish material consisting of the dried flowers, fruiting tops and leaves of the cannabis plant, Cannabis sativa. Hashish or cannabis resin is the dried brown or black resinous secretion of the flowering tops

2018 Canadian Centre on Substance Abuse

38. Corrigendum to: Condition index monitoring supports conservation priorities for the protection of threatened grass-finch populations Full Text available with Trip Pro

Corrigendum to: Condition index monitoring supports conservation priorities for the protection of threatened grass-finch populations [This corrects the article DOI: 10.1093/conphys/cov025.][This corrects the article DOI: 10.1093/conphys/cov025.].

2018 Conservation physiology

39. Pharmacotherapeutic considerations for use of cannabinoids to relieve pain in patients with malignant diseases Full Text available with Trip Pro

Pharmacotherapeutic considerations for use of cannabinoids to relieve pain in patients with malignant diseases The aim of this review was to assess the efficacy of cannabis preparations for relieving pain in patients with malignant diseases, through a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs), which were predominantly double-blind trials that compared cannabis preparation to a placebo.An electronic search of all literature published until June 2017 was made in MEDLINE/PubMed (...) , Embase, The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register and specific web pages devoted to cannabis.Fifteen of the 18 trials demonstrated a significant analgesic effect of cannabinoids as compared to placebo. The most commonly reported adverse effects were generally well tolerated, mild to moderate. The main side effects were drowsiness, nausea, vomiting and dry mouth. There is evidence that cannabinoids are safe and modestly effective in neuropathic pain and also for relieving pain in patients with malignant

2018 EvidenceUpdates

40. Daily use of high-potency cannabis is associated with an increased risk of admission and more intervention after first-episode psychosis

Daily use of high-potency cannabis is associated with an increased risk of admission and more intervention after first-episode psychosis Daily use of high-potency cannabis is associated with an increased risk of admission and more intervention after first-episode psychosis | Evidence-Based Mental Health We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies (...) , please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Daily use of high-potency cannabis is associated with an increased risk of admission and more intervention after

2018 Evidence-Based Mental Health