Latest & greatest articles for cardiac arrest

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Top results for cardiac arrest

221. The use of adrenaline and long-term survival in cardiopulmonary resuscitation following cardiac arrest

The use of adrenaline and long-term survival in cardiopulmonary resuscitation following cardiac arrest BestBets: The use of adrenaline and long-term survival in cardiopulmonary resuscitation following cardiac arrest The use of adrenaline and long-term survival in cardiopulmonary resuscitation following cardiac arrest Report By: Craig Miller - 4th Year Medical Student Search checked by Jerry Nolan - Consultant Anaesthetist Institution: University of Southampton, Southampton, UK Date Submitted (...) : 8th May 2012 Date Completed: 17th April 2013 Last Modified: 17th April 2013 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [patients receiving cardiopulmonary resuscitation following cardiac arrest], is [the use of adrenaline beneficial] in [improving long-term survival]? Search Strategy Ovid MEDLINE(R) 1946 to December Week 4 2012 ({(CPR.mp. OR exp cardiopulmonary resuscitation/OR internal cardiac massage.mp. OR chest compressions.mp.) AND (adrenaline.mp. OR exp epinephrine/) AND (survival.mp

2013 BestBETS

222. Long-term outcomes in elderly survivors of in-hospital cardiac arrest. Full Text available with Trip Pro

comparisons). Moreover, 1-year readmission rates were higher among patients who were black, those who were women, and those who had substantial neurologic disability (P<0.05 for all comparisons). These differences in survival and readmission rates persisted at 2 years. At 3 years, the rate of survival among survivors of in-hospital cardiac arrest was similar to that of patients who had been hospitalized with heart failure and were discharged alive (43.5% and 44.9%, respectively; risk ratio, 0.98; 95 (...) % confidence interval, 0.95 to 1.02; P=0.35).Among elderly survivors of in-hospital cardiac arrest, nearly 60% were alive at 1 year, and the rate of 3-year survival was similar to that among patients with heart failure. Survival and readmission rates differed according to the demographic characteristics of the patients and neurologic status at discharge. (Funded by the American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.).

2013 NEJM

223. Thrombolytic Drugs for Cardiac Arrest: A Review of the Clinical Effectiveness

RD. Incidence of EMS-treated out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in the United States. Resuscitation. 2004 Oct;63(1):17-24. 3. Spaulding CM, Joly LM, Rosenberg A, Monchi M, Weber SN, Dhainaut JF, et al. Immediate coronary angiography in survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. N Engl J Med. 1997 Jun 5;336(23):1629-33. 4. Kuisma M, Alaspaa A. Out-of-hospital cardiac arrests of non-cardiac origin. Epidemiology and outcome. Eur Heart J. 1997 Jul;18(7):1122-8. 5. Berg RA, Hemphill R, Abella BS (...) . 14-18 Interventions and Comparators Thrombolytics that were evaluated in the included studies were alteplase, reteplase, tenecteplase, and t-PA (type not specified). 11-13 Placebo was the comparator in the randomized controlled trials included in the systematic review. 14,16,18 One observational study compared Thrombolytic Drugs for Cardiac Arrest 4 thrombolysis to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), 13 and standard resuscitation care was used as the comparator in the other observational

2013 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

224. Association of prehospital advanced airway management with neurologic outcome and survival in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Association of prehospital advanced airway management with neurologic outcome and survival in patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. It is unclear whether advanced airway management such as endotracheal intubation or use of supraglottic airway devices in the prehospital setting improves outcomes following out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) compared with conventional bag-valve-mask ventilation.To test the hypothesis that prehospital advanced airway management is associated (...) , 0.37-0.40) after adjusting for age, sex, etiology of arrest, first documented rhythm, witnessed status, type of bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation, use of public access automated external defibrillator, epinephrine administration, and time intervals. Similarly, the odds of neurologically favorable survival were significantly lower both for endotracheal intubation (adjusted OR, 0.41; 95% CI, 0.37-0.45) and for supraglottic airways (adjusted OR, 0.38; 95% CI, 0.36-0.40). In a propensity score

2013 JAMA

225. Strategies for Improving Survival After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in the United States: 2013 Consensus Recommendations Full Text available with Trip Pro

January 2019 This site uses cookies. By continuing to browse this site you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Free Access article Share on Jump to Free Access article Strategies for Improving Survival After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in the United States: 2013 Consensus Recommendations A Consensus Statement From the American Heart Association , MD, MSc, Chair , MD, PhD , MD , MD , MD, MHS, FAHA , MD, FAHA , MD , RN, MS , RN, DNSc, FAHA , and MD, FAHA MD, MS, FAHAon behalf of the American Heart (...) Strategies for Improving Survival After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in the United States: 2013 Consensus Recommendations Strategies for Improving Survival After In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest in the United States: 2013 Consensus Recommendations | Circulation Search Hello Guest! Login to your account Email Password Keep me logged in Search March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 March 2019 February 2019 February 2019 February 2019 February 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019 January 2019

2013 American Heart Association

226. Cohort study: Compression-only CPR may improve survival for patients in cardiac arrest due to shockable rhythms treated by bystanders with public access defibrillation

Cohort study: Compression-only CPR may improve survival for patients in cardiac arrest due to shockable rhythms treated by bystanders with public access defibrillation Compression-only CPR may improve survival for patients in cardiac arrest due to shockable rhythms treated by bystanders with public access defibrillation | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any (...) arrest due to shockable rhythms treated by bystanders with public access defibrillation Article Text Prognosis Cohort study Compression-only CPR may improve survival for patients in cardiac arrest due to shockable rhythms treated by bystanders with public access defibrillation Andrew Whittington 1 , 2 , Gavin D Perkins 1 , 2 , 3 Statistics from Altmetric.com Commentary on: Iwami T , Kitamura T , Kawamura T , et al .; for the Japanese Circulation Society Resuscitation Science Study (JCS-ReSS) Group

2013 Evidence-Based Medicine

227. Does Advanced Airway Management Improve Outcomes in Adult Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest?

Does Advanced Airway Management Improve Outcomes in Adult Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest? Systematic Review Snapshot TAKE-HOME MESSAGE Advanced airway management in adult out-of-hospital cardiac arrest lacks clear bene?t, but available studies are unable to control for many confounders in this population. DoesAdvancedAirwayManagementImprove Outcomes in Adult Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest? EBEM Commentators Jestin N. Carlson, MD, MS Department of Emergency Medicine Saint Vincent Hospital Erie (...) , 2013, the authors also reviewed references of relevant articles and contacted experts in the ?eld for additional article recommendations. STUDY SELECTION Observational and experimental studies including both basic (bag- valve-mask ventilation, head-tilt- chin-lift, mouth-to-mouth ventilation, nasopharyngeal airways, and oropharyngeal airways) airway interventions and advanced (intubation, supraglottic airways, and surgical airways) airway interventions in adult out-of- hospital cardiac arrest

2013 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

228. Does Active Chest Compression-Decompression Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Decrease Mortality, Neurologic Impairment, or Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation-Related Complications After Cardiac Arrest?

Does Active Chest Compression-Decompression Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Decrease Mortality, Neurologic Impairment, or Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation-Related Complications After Cardiac Arrest? Systematic Review Snapshot TAKE-HOME MESSAGE There is no clear bene?t from active compression-decompression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in out-of-hospital or inhospital cardiac arrest. Does Active Chest Compression-Decompression Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Decrease Mortality, Neurologic (...) Impairment, or Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation–Related Complications After Cardiac Arrest? EBEM Commentator Joshua C. Reynolds, MD, MS Department of Emergency Medicine Michigan State University College of Human Medicine Grand Rapids, MI Results Selected results of pooled individual patient data. Outcome Measures Studies, n Participants, n RR (95% CI) Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest Mortality at hospital discharge 9 3,412 0.99 (0.98–1.01) Neurologic impairment* 5 385 1.74 (1.06–2.83) Inhospital cardiac

2013 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

229. Does Calcium Administration During Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Improve Survival for Patients in Cardiac Arrest?

the data exactly showed, and how they in?uenced the authors of the review. Commentary The ?rst published guidelines for the management of patients by advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) were developed by the American Heart Association in 1974, 15-17 who initially recommended calcium salts for treatment of cardiac arrest. However, these guidelines had no references to support this recom- mendation. Since then, there have been revisions about the indications of calcium in patients with cardiac arrest (...) . 18-21 In 2005, the American Heart Association and European Resuscitation Council published the lack of data and potential harm of calcium during CPR. The guide- lines state that calcium should be used in cases of hyperkalemia, hypocalcaemia, or calcium channel blocker intoxication but fail to clarify whether these 3 indications remain for patients in cardiac arrest. 22,23 There are 2 broad types of studies includedinthisreviewbyKetteetal. 17 Onecategoryconsistedofinvestigators who tested

2013 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

230. Does the Absence of Cardiac Activity on Ultrasonography Predict Failed Resuscitation in Cardiac Arrest?

-19. 3. Shoenberger JM, Massopust K, Henderson SO. The use of bedside ultrasound in cardiac arrest. Cal J Emerg Med. 2007;8:47-50. 4. Gueugniaud PY, Mols P, Goldstein P, et al. A comparison of repeated high doses and repeated standard doses of epinephrine for cardiac arrest outside the hospital. European Epinephrine Study Group. N Engl J Med. 1998;339:1595- 1601. 5. Becker LB, Aufderheide TP, Geocadin RG, et al; American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care Committee; Council (...) Does the Absence of Cardiac Activity on Ultrasonography Predict Failed Resuscitation in Cardiac Arrest? SystematicReviewSnapshot TAKE-HOME MESSAGE The absence of cardiac activity on ultrasonography does not universally lead to failure of resuscitation in cardiac arrest. METHODS DATA SOURCES MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library were searched on February 23, 2011, and again on January 29, 2012. The references of relevant articles were searched for any additional studies. Expert

2013 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

231. Do Vasopressors Improve Outcomes in Patients With Cardiac Arrest?

Do Vasopressors Improve Outcomes in Patients With Cardiac Arrest? SystematicReviewSnapshot TAKE-HOME MESSAGE Research evidence is currently inadequate to either support or reject the use of vasopressors in cardiac arrest. METHODS DATA SOURCES The authors searched PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Li- brary through October 2011. Ad- ditionally, they reviewed bibliogra- phies of selected articles and the American Heart Association Emergency Cardiovascular Care master library and the C2005 (...) In- ternational Liaison Committee of Resuscitation worksheets. STUDY SELECTION Controlled trials, meta-analyses, and case series assessing the use of vasopressors in human cardiac arrest were reviewed by 2 au- thors. Studies without abstracts, in abstract only, without human subjects, and involving trauma, as well as case reports, narrative reviews, and non-English articles, were excluded. DATA EXTRACTION AND SYNTHESIS Articles were classi?ed by level of evidence 1 to 5 for therapy and scored “poor” to “good

2013 Annals of Emergency Medicine Systematic Review Snapshots

232. Targeted temperature management at 33°C versus 36°C after cardiac arrest. Full Text available with Trip Pro

scale, the comparable rate was 52% in both groups (risk ratio, 1.01; 95% CI, 0.89 to 1.14; P=0.87). The results of analyses adjusted for known prognostic factors were similar.In unconscious survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest of presumed cardiac cause, hypothermia at a targeted temperature of 33°C did not confer a benefit as compared with a targeted temperature of 36°C. (Funded by the Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation and others; TTM ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01020916.). (...) Targeted temperature management at 33°C versus 36°C after cardiac arrest. Unconscious survivors of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest have a high risk of death or poor neurologic function. Therapeutic hypothermia is recommended by international guidelines, but the supporting evidence is limited, and the target temperature associated with the best outcome is unknown. Our objective was to compare two target temperatures, both intended to prevent fever.In an international trial, we randomly assigned

2013 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high

233. Cohort study: Elderly in-hospital cardiac arrest patients who are resuscitated with neurological recovery experience favourable long-term survival similar to non-arrest heart failure patients

Cohort study: Elderly in-hospital cardiac arrest patients who are resuscitated with neurological recovery experience favourable long-term survival similar to non-arrest heart failure patients Elderly in-hospital cardiac arrest patients who are resuscitated with neurological recovery experience favourable long-term survival similar to non-arrest heart failure patients | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can (...) cardiac arrest patients who are resuscitated with neurological recovery experience favourable long-term survival similar to non-arrest heart failure patients Article Text Prognosis Cohort study Elderly in-hospital cardiac arrest patients who are resuscitated with neurological recovery experience favourable long-term survival similar to non-arrest heart failure patients T Jared Bunch Statistics from Altmetric.com Commentary on: Chan PS , Nallamothu BK , Krumholz HM , et al . American Heart Association

2013 Evidence-Based Medicine

234. Vasopressin, steroids, and epinephrine and neurologically favorable survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest: a randomized clinical trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Vasopressin, steroids, and epinephrine and neurologically favorable survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest: a randomized clinical trial. Among patients with cardiac arrest, preliminary data have shown improved return of spontaneous circulation and survival to hospital discharge with the vasopressin-steroids-epinephrine (VSE) combination.To determine whether combined vasopressin-epinephrine during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and corticosteroid supplementation during and after CPR (...) improve survival to hospital discharge with a Cerebral Performance Category (CPC) score of 1 or 2 in vasopressor-requiring, in-hospital cardiac arrest.Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial performed from September 1, 2008, to October 1, 2010, in 3 Greek tertiary care centers (2400 beds) with 268 consecutive patients with cardiac arrest requiring epinephrine according to resuscitation guidelines (from 364 patients assessed for eligibility).Patients received either

2013 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

235. Trends in Survival after In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest. Full Text available with Trip Pro

% in 2000 and 28.1% in 2009 (adjusted rate ratio per year, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.97 to 1.00; P=0.02 for trend).Both survival and neurologic outcomes after in-hospital cardiac arrest have improved during the past decade at hospitals participating in a large national quality-improvement registry. (Funded by the American Heart Association.). (...) Trends in Survival after In-Hospital Cardiac Arrest. Despite advances in resuscitation care in recent years, it is not clear whether survival and neurologic function after in-hospital cardiac arrest have improved over time.We identified all adults who had an in-hospital cardiac arrest at 374 hospitals in the Get with the Guidelines-Resuscitation registry between 2000 and 2009. Using multivariable regression, we examined temporal trends in risk-adjusted rates of survival to discharge. Additional

2012 NEJM

236. Vasopressin for cardiac arrest: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Vasopressin for cardiac arrest: meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2012 DARE.

237. Duration of resuscitation efforts and survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest: an observational study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Duration of resuscitation efforts and survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest: an observational study. During in-hospital cardiac arrests, how long resuscitation attempts should be continued before termination of efforts is unknown. We investigated whether duration of resuscitation attempts varies between hospitals and whether patients at hospitals that attempt resuscitation for longer have higher survival rates than do those at hospitals with shorter durations of resuscitation (...) efforts.Between 2000 and 2008, we identified 64,339 patients with cardiac arrests at 435 US hospitals within the Get With The Guidelines—Resuscitation registry. For each hospital, we calculated the median duration of resuscitation before termination of efforts in non-survivors as a measure of the hospital's overall tendency for longer attempts. We used multilevel regression models to assess the association between the length of resuscitation attempts and risk-adjusted survival. Our primary endpoints were

2012 Lancet

238. Age-Specific Differences in Outcomes After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests

Age-Specific Differences in Outcomes After Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrests PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2012 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club

239. Lifevest system (Asahi Kasei Corp.) wearable cardiac defibrillator for prevention of sudden cardiac arrest

. Citation Lifevest system (Asahi Kasei Corp.) wearable cardiac defibrillator for prevention of sudden cardiac arrest. Lansdale: HAYES, Inc.. Healthcare Technology Brief Publication. 2012 Authors' conclusions Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is typically defined as unanticipated death due to cardiac causes that occurs within 1 hour of the onset of acute symptoms. Approximately 287,000 people in the United States die each year from heart disease without being admitted to the hospital. The overwhelming majority (...) of SCDs from heart disease are thought to be caused by ventricular fibrillation. Ventricular fibrillation is rapid, uncoordinated twitching of the ventricle that replaces normal heart rhythm and may lead to sudden cardiac arrest (SCA). Early defibrillation, the restoration of the normal heart rhythm through drug treatment or through electrical shocks delivered by an implanted or external device, is instrumental in surviving an episode of ventricular fibrillation, and survival drops to only 5

2012 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

240. Predicting cardiac arrest on the wards: a nested case-control study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Predicting cardiac arrest on the wards: a nested case-control study Current rapid response team activation criteria were not statistically derived using ward vital signs, and the best vital sign predictors of cardiac arrest (CA) have not been determined. In addition, it is unknown when vital signs begin to accurately detect this event prior to CA.We conducted a nested case-control study of 88 patients experiencing CA on the wards of a university hospital between November 2008 and January 2011 (...) under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC] 0.77; 95% CI, 0.71-0.82), followed by maximum respiratory rate (AUC 0.72; 95% CI, 0.65-0.78), maximum heart rate (AUC 0.68; 95% CI, 0.61-0.74), maximum pulse pressure index (AUC 0.61; 95% CI, 0.54-0.68), and minimum diastolic BP (AUC 0.60; 95% CI, 0.53-0.67). By 48 h prior to CA, the MEWS was higher in cases (P = .005), with increasing disparity leading up to the event.The MEWS was significantly different between patients experiencing CA

2012 EvidenceUpdates