Latest & greatest articles for cardiac arrest

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Top results for cardiac arrest

281. Hypothermia after cardiac arrest

Hypothermia after cardiac arrest Hypothermia after cardiac arrest Hypothermia after cardiac arrest Flynn K Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Flynn K. Hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Boston: VA Technology Assessment Program (VATAP). 2010 Authors' objectives VHA’s TAAG asked TAP for a review of the literature as support (...) for use of hypothermia after cardiac arrest, initially in 2008 and again in 2010. TAP approached its charge through available systematic reviews, guidelines or technology assessments based on such reviews, and economic evaluations using high quality primary studies or reviews as sources of effectiveness data. This document will refer collectively to these synthesis publication types as “reviews”. We then updated review searches to the present to confirm the presence or absence of subsequently review

2010 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

282. Compression-only CPR or standard CPR in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Full Text available with Trip Pro

for compression-only vs. standard CPR, 1.7 percentage points; 95% confidence interval, -1.2 to 4.6; P=0.29).This prospective, randomized study showed no significant difference with respect to survival at 30 days between instructions given by an emergency medical dispatcher, before the arrival of EMS personnel, for compression-only CPR and instructions for standard CPR in patients with suspected, witnessed, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. (Funded by the Swedish Heart–Lung Foundation and others; Karolinska (...) Compression-only CPR or standard CPR in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Emergency medical dispatchers give instructions on how to perform cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) over the telephone to callers requesting help for a patient with suspected cardiac arrest, before the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS) personnel. A previous study indicated that instructions to perform CPR consisting of only chest compression result in a treatment efficacy that is similar or even superior

2010 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain

283. Chest compressions before defibrillation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials

Chest compressions before defibrillation for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2010 DARE.

284. Racial differences in survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Racial differences in survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest. Racial differences in survival have not been previously studied after in-hospital cardiac arrest, an event for which access to care is not likely to influence treatment.To estimate racial differences in survival for patients with in-hospital cardiac arrests and examine the association of sociodemographic and clinical factors and the admitting hospital with racial differences in survival.Cohort study of 10,011 patients with cardiac (...) , 0.84 [95% CI, 0.81-0.88]) and postresuscitation survival (45.2% vs 55.5% for whites; unadjusted RR, 0.85 [95% CI, 0.79-0.91]). Adjustment for the hospital site at which patients received care explained a substantial portion of the racial differences in successful resuscitation (adjusted RR, 0.92 [95% CI, 0.88-0.96]; P < .001) and eliminated the racial differences in postresuscitation survival (adjusted RR, 0.99 [95% CI, 0.92-1.06]; P = .68).Black patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest were

2009 JAMA

285. Validation of 3 termination of resuscitation criteria for good neurologic survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (Abstract)

Validation of 3 termination of resuscitation criteria for good neurologic survival after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest Several termination of resuscitation criteria have been proposed to identify patients who will not survive to hospital discharge after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. However, only 1 set has been derived to specifically predict survival to hospital discharge with good neurologic function. The objectives of this study were to externally validate the basic life support (BLS (...) ) termination of resuscitation, advanced life support (ALS) termination of resuscitation, and neurologic termination of resuscitation criteria and compare their abilities to predict survival to hospital discharge with good neurologic function after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.This was a secondary analysis of the Denver Cardiac Arrest Registry. Consecutive adult nontraumatic cardiac arrest patients in Denver County from January 1, 2003, through December 31, 2004, were included in the study. The BLS

2009 EvidenceUpdates

286. Intravenous drug administration during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a randomized trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Intravenous drug administration during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a randomized trial. Intravenous access and drug administration are included in advanced cardiac life support (ACLS) guidelines despite a lack of evidence for improved outcomes. Epinephrine was an independent predictor of poor outcome in a large epidemiological study, possibly due to toxicity of the drug or cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) interruptions secondary to establishing an intravenous line and drug (...) administration.To determine whether removing intravenous drug administration from an ACLS protocol would improve survival to hospital discharge after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.Prospective, randomized controlled trial of consecutive adult patients with out-of-hospital nontraumatic cardiac arrest treated within the emergency medical service system in Oslo, Norway, between May 1, 2003, and April 28, 2008.Advanced cardiac life support with intravenous drug administration or ACLS without access to intravenous

2009 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

287. Prehospital/emergency department therapeutic hypothermia for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in adults

. Report may be purchased from . Citation Prehospital/emergency department therapeutic hypothermia for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in adults . Lansdale: HAYES, Inc.. 2009 Authors' objectives Out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) causes approximately 310,000 deaths before the patient reaches the hospital Emergency Department each year in the United States. Sudden cardiac death occurs more often in patients who are recovering from a heart attack or whose hearts have a reduced ability to pump (...) Prehospital/emergency department therapeutic hypothermia for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in adults Prehospital/emergency department therapeutic hypothermia for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in adults Prehospital/emergency department therapeutic hypothermia for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) in adults Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database

2009 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

288. ResQPOD Impedance Threshold Device (ITD) (Advanced Circulatory Systems Inc.) for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest

ResQPOD Impedance Threshold Device (ITD) (Advanced Circulatory Systems Inc.) for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest ResQPOD Impedance Threshold Device (ITD) (Advanced Circulatory Systems Inc.) for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest ResQPOD Impedance Threshold Device (ITD) (Advanced Circulatory Systems Inc.) for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA (...) database. Report may be purchased from Citation ResQPOD Impedance Threshold Device (ITD) (Advanced Circulatory Systems Inc.) for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest . Lansdale: HAYES, Inc.. 2009 Authors' objectives Each year in the United States, out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) causes an estimated 310,000 deaths before the patient reaches the hospital emergency department. Patients experiencing OHCA are given cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), a combination of chest compressions, to keep oxygen-rich

2009 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

289. Cost-effectiveness of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cost-effectiveness of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest Cost-effectiveness of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest Cost-effectiveness of therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest Merchant RM, Becker LB, Abella BS, Asch DA, Groeneveld PW Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical (...) assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of therapeutic hypothermia for patients following witnessed ventricular fibrillation and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest, compared with conventional care. The authors concluded that therapeutic hypothermia improved the clinical outcomes and was cost-effective in the USA. The methods were appropriate and the results were reported in full. The conclusions appear to be appropriate

2009 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

290. Emergency caesarean section in cardiac arrest before the 3rd trimester.

1980-2008 Week 1 The Cochrane Library [{exp pregnancy/ OR pregnancy.mp. OR exp pregnancy complications/ OR pregnancy complications.mp.} AND { exp heart arrest/ OR cardiac arrest.mp.} AND {exp caesarean section/ OR caesarean section.mp.} AND {perimortem.mp. OR resuscitation.mp. OR exp cardiopulmonary resuscitation}] LIMIT to human and English language Search Outcome 15 papers were identified of which 4 were relevant to the issue of caesarean section in the second trimester. Relevant Paper(s) Author (...) Emergency caesarean section in cardiac arrest before the 3rd trimester. BestBets: Emergency caesarean section in cardiac arrest before the 3rd trimester. Emergency caesarean section in cardiac arrest before the 3rd trimester. Report By: Helene Svinos - Medical Student Search checked by Anna O' Malley - Medical Student Institution: University of Manchester Date Submitted: 9th June 2008 Last Modified: 29th October 2008 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [a second trimester pregnant

2008 BestBETS

291. An escalating higher energy regimen was better than a fixed lower energy regimen for defibrillation in out of hospital cardiac arrest

An escalating higher energy regimen was better than a fixed lower energy regimen for defibrillation in out of hospital cardiac arrest An escalating higher energy regimen was better than a fixed lower energy regimen for defibrillation in out of hospital cardiac arrest | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please (...) cardiac arrest Article Text Therapeutics An escalating higher energy regimen was better than a fixed lower energy regimen for defibrillation in out of hospital cardiac arrest Statistics from Altmetric.com Request Permissions If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways. Copyright information

2008 Evidence-Based Medicine

292. Regional variation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest incidence and outcome. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Regional variation in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest incidence and outcome. The health and policy implications of regional variation in incidence and outcome of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest remain to be determined.To evaluate whether cardiac arrest incidence and outcome differ across geographic regions.Prospective observational study (the Resuscitation Outcomes Consortium) of all out-of-hospital cardiac arrests in 10 North American sites (8 US and 2 Canadian) from May 1, 2006, to April 30 (...) by EMS personnel or with an initial rhythm of ventricular fibrillation.Among the 10 sites, the total catchment population was 21.4 million, and there were 20,520 cardiac arrests. A total of 11,898 (58.0%) had resuscitation attempted; 2729 (22.9% of treated) had initial rhythm of ventricular fibrillation or ventricular tachycardia or rhythms that were shockable by an automated external defibrillator; and 954 (4.6% of total) were discharged alive. The median incidence of EMS-treated cardiac arrest

2008 JAMA

293. Prehospital termination of resuscitation in cases of refractory out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Prehospital termination of resuscitation in cases of refractory out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Identifying patients in the out-of-hospital setting who have no realistic hope of surviving an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest could enhance utilization of scarce health care resources.To validate 2 out-of-hospital termination-of-resuscitation rules developed by the Ontario Prehospital Life Support (OPALS) study group, one for use by responders providing basic life support (BLS) and the other (...) for those providing advanced life support (ALS).Retrospective cohort study using surveillance data prospectively submitted by emergency medical systems and hospitals in 8 US cities to the Cardiac Arrest Registry to Enhance Survival (CARES) between October 1, 2005, and April 30, 2008. Case patients were 7235 adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest; of these, 5505 met inclusion criteria.Specificity and positive predictive value of each termination-of-resuscitation rule for identifying patients who

2008 JAMA

294. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation with assisted extracorporeal life-support versus conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in adults with in-hospital cardiac arrest: an observational study and propensity analysis. (Abstract)

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation with assisted extracorporeal life-support versus conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation in adults with in-hospital cardiac arrest: an observational study and propensity analysis. Extracorporeal life-support as an adjunct to cardiac resuscitation has shown encouraging outcomes in patients with cardiac arrest. However, there is little evidence about the benefit of the procedure compared with conventional cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), especially when (...) continued for more than 10 min. We aimed to assess whether extracorporeal CPR was better than conventional CPR for patients with in-hospital cardiac arrest of cardiac origin.We did a 3-year prospective observational study on the use of extracorporeal life-support for patients aged 18-75 years with witnessed in-hospital cardiac arrest of cardiac origin undergoing CPR of more than 10 min compared with patients receiving conventional CPR. A matching process based on propensity-score was done to equalise

2008 Lancet

295. Sudden Cardiac Arrest Associated with Early Repolarization. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Sudden Cardiac Arrest Associated with Early Repolarization. Early repolarization is a common electrocardiographic finding that is generally considered to be benign. Its potential to cause cardiac arrhythmias has been hypothesized from experimental studies, but it is not known whether there is a clinical association with sudden cardiac arrest.We reviewed data from 206 case subjects at 22 centers who were resuscitated after cardiac arrest due to idiopathic ventricular fibrillation and assessed (...) was more frequent in case subjects with idiopathic ventricular fibrillation than in control subjects (31% vs. 5%, P<0.001). Among case subjects, those with early repolarization were more likely to be male and to have a history of syncope or sudden cardiac arrest during sleep than those without early repolarization. In eight subjects, the origin of ectopy that initiated ventricular arrhythmias was mapped to sites concordant with the localization of repolarization abnormalities. During a mean (+/-SD

2008 NEJM

296. Is internal massage superior to external massage for patients suffering a cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery?

of Cardiothoracic Surgery, James Cook University Hospital, Middlesborough Date Submitted: 14th February 2008 Date Completed: 23rd April 2008 Last Modified: 24th April 2008 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [patients with cardiac arrest after cardiac surgery] is [external cardiac massage or internal massage] better in generating optimal [cardiac index and coronary perfusion]? Clinical Scenario A 52 year old patient 36-hours after mitral valve repair and grafts arrests with an asystolic ECG. He had (...) Consensus on science 2 human studies after cardiac surgery and 2 out of hospital arrest have been published. The observed benefits of open-chest cardiac massage included improved coronary perfusion pressure and increased return of spontaneous circulation. Evidence from animal studies indicates that open-chest CPR produces greater survival rates, perfusion pressures, and organ blood flow than closed chest CPR Treatment recommendations Open-chest CPR should be considered for patients with cardiac arrest

2008 BestBETS

297. What cardioversion protocol for ventricular fibrillation should be followed for patients who arrest shortly post-cardiac surgery?

, Bowdle A, Jett K et al. Biphasic shocks compared with monophasic damped sine wave shocks for direct ventricular defibrillation during open-heart surgery. Anesthesiology 2003; 98:1063–1069. Edelson DP, Abella BS, Kramer-Johansen J et al. Effects of compression depth and pre-shock pause predict defibrillation failure during cardiac arrest. Resuscitation 2006; 71:137–145. van Alem AP, Chapman FW, Lank P et al. A prospective randomised and blinded comparison of first shock success of monophasic (...) What cardioversion protocol for ventricular fibrillation should be followed for patients who arrest shortly post-cardiac surgery? BestBets: What cardioversion protocol for ventricular fibrillation should be followed for patients who arrest shortly post-cardiac surgery? What cardioversion protocol for ventricular fibrillation should be followed for patients who arrest shortly post-cardiac surgery? Report By: Lydia Richardson, Arosha Dissanayake, and Joel Dunning - Specialist Registrars

2008 BestBETS

298. Rethinking bystander CPR for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest Full Text available with Trip Pro

cardiac arrest are currently underway; one in the United States [ ] and the other in Scandinavia. A third such study in England recently completed enrollment [ ]. In the absence of definitive evidence from clinical trials, much controversy exists over bystander CPR [ – ]. To date, CPR is still primarily taught in the conventional form of chest compression with intermittent mouth-to-mouth ventilation. American Heart Association guidelines recommend cardiac-only resuscitation by bystanders in dispatcher (...) ): an observational study. Lancet. 2007, 369: 920-926. 10.1016/S0140-6736(07)60451-6. 2005 American Heart Association Guidelines for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care. Circulation. 2005, 112: IV1-203. Iwami T, Kawamura T, Hiraide A, Berg RA, Hayashi Y, Nishiuchi T, Kajino K, Yonemoto N, Yukioka H, Sugimoto H, Kakuchi H, Sase K, Yokoyama H, Nonogi H: Effectiveness of bystander-initiated cardiac-only resuscitation for patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest. Circulation. 2007, 116

2008 Critical Care - EBM Journal Club

299. Survival from in-hospital cardiac arrest during nights and weekends. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Survival from in-hospital cardiac arrest during nights and weekends. Occurrence of in-hospital cardiac arrest and survival patterns have not been characterized by time of day or day of week. Patient physiology and process of care for in-hospital cardiac arrest may be different at night and on weekends because of hospital factors unrelated to patient, event, or location variables.To determine whether outcomes after in-hospital cardiac arrest differ during nights and weekends compared with days (...) /evenings and weekdays.We examined survival from cardiac arrest in hourly time segments, defining day/evening as 7:00 am to 10:59 pm, night as 11:00 pm to 6:59 am, and weekend as 11:00 pm on Friday to 6:59 am on Monday, in 86,748 adult, consecutive in-hospital cardiac arrest events in the National Registry of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation obtained from 507 medical/surgical participating hospitals from January 1, 2000, through February 1, 2007.The primary outcome of survival to discharge and secondary

2008 JAMA

300. Delayed time to defibrillation after in-hospital cardiac arrest. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Delayed time to defibrillation after in-hospital cardiac arrest. Expert guidelines advocate defibrillation within 2 minutes after an in-hospital cardiac arrest caused by ventricular arrhythmia. However, empirical data on the prevalence of delayed defibrillation in the United States and its effect on survival are limited.We identified 6789 patients who had cardiac arrest due to ventricular fibrillation or pulseless ventricular tachycardia at 369 hospitals participating in the National Registry (...) with delayed defibrillation included black race, noncardiac admitting diagnosis, and occurrence of cardiac arrest at a hospital with fewer than 250 beds, in an unmonitored hospital unit, and during after-hours periods (5 p.m. to 8 a.m. or weekends). Delayed defibrillation was associated with a significantly lower probability of surviving to hospital discharge (22.2%, vs. 39.3% when defibrillation was not delayed; adjusted odds ratio, 0.48; 95% confidence interval, 0.42 to 0.54; P<0.001). In addition

2008 NEJM