Latest & greatest articles for elderly

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on elderly or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on elderly and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for elderly

901. A narrative synthesis systematic review of digital self-monitoring interventions for middle-aged and older adults. (Full text)

A narrative synthesis systematic review of digital self-monitoring interventions for middle-aged and older adults. Self-monitoring is crucial to raise awareness for own behaviors and emotions, and thus facilitate self-management. The composition of self-monitoring within interventions, however, varies and guidelines are currently unavailable. This review aimed to provide a comprehensive overview of technology-based self-monitoring interventions that intend to improve health in middle-aged (...) and older adults (>45 years).Five online databases were systematically searched and articles were independently screened. A narrative synthesis of 26 studies with 21 unique interventions was conducted. Primary focus lay on the composition of self-monitoring within interventions, including technology used, health-aspects monitored, and type of feedback provided. Secondly, the usability of/adherence to the self-monitoring treatment, intervention effects, and their sustainability were examined.Studies

2020 Internet interventions PubMed abstract

902. Guidance for Providers Caring for Women and Men Of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure

Guidance for Providers Caring for Women and Men Of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure -1- Guidance for Providers Caring for Women and Men Of Reproductive Age with Possible Zika Virus Exposure (Modified from CDC a- i FDA j-l and WHO k Published Guidance) Updated July 2019 Planning Pregnancy for Infected, Exposed, or Possibly Exposed Individuals This is an update of the ASRM Zika virus guidance for providers that addresses the care of non-pregnant patients desiring pregnancy (...) taking into account any new available data and such variables as age of the female patient and other infertility factors with documentation of the conversation and decision. 4. Symptomatic women and men attempting pregnancy through ART with possible Zika virus exposure should have testing that includes the Zika virus nucleic acid test (NAT) to rule out active Zika infection, and serologic testing, as outlined in section #8 below, to identify Zika immunity, before proceeding on with infertility

2020 Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology

903. Best-practice prevention alone or with conventional or biological caries management for 3- to 7-year-olds: the FiCTION three-arm RCT

Best-practice prevention alone or with conventional or biological caries management for 3- to 7-year-olds: the FiCTION three-arm RCT Best-practice prevention alone or with conventional or biological caries management for 3- to 7-year-olds: the FiCTION three-arm RCT Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try

2020 NIHR HTA programme

904. Combination non-pharmacologic intervention for orthostatic hypotension in older people: a phase 2 study (Full text)

to an error Add Cancel Add to My Bibliography My Bibliography Unable to load your delegates due to an error Add Cancel Actions Cite Share Permalink Copy Page navigation Age Ageing Actions 2019 Dec 23 [Online ahead of print] Combination Non-Pharmacologic Intervention for Orthostatic Hypotension in Older People: A Phase 2 Study , Affiliations Expand Affiliations 1 Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE2 4HH, UK. 2 The Falls and Syncope Service, Newcastle upon Tyne (...) Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 4LP, UK. 3 NIHR Newcastle Biomedical Research Centre, Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Trust and Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. PMID: 31868889 DOI: Item in Clipboard Combination Non-Pharmacologic Intervention for Orthostatic Hypotension in Older People: A Phase 2 Study James Frith et al. Age Ageing . 2019 Show details Age Ageing Actions Authors , Affiliations 1 Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon

2020 EvidenceUpdates PubMed abstract

905. Ageing and mobility: A grand challenge

as a barrier to use and improvement. This results in difficulties for individuals to navigate the systems and weakens system-wide incentives for integration and innovation. On average at least one-third of older people report unmet travel needs. It worsens with age, and women were reported to be more affected than men. (Luiu et al 2016). Mobility challenges faced in later life6 © Centre for Ageing Better 20197 © Centre for Ageing Better 2019 As we grow older, we are more likely to have health conditions (...) % of older people cannot reach a hospital within 30 minutes by public transport. (Future of Mobility: Evidence Review). Accessible and inclusive new technologies, services and business models Opportunities for innovation8 © Centre for Ageing Better 2019 Specific issues to address in their development include: - New vehicles, including Autonomous Vehicles, need to be designed to be accessible for people with limited mobility. - Addressing the door to vehicle portion of the journey, which can

2020 The Centre for Ageing Better

906. The State of Ageing in 2019: Adding life to our years

occupations. Pessimism about getting older is also linked to poorer health. People who worry about their health getting worse and those who expect to get lonely are around 30% more likely to have a negative experience of ageing than people who don’t. 31 8% 6% 5% 3% 3% 25 to 34 year olds 50 to 64 year olds 35 to 49 year olds 65 to 74 year olds 75 and over professional occupations routine occupations 7% 20% Later lives todayHow will future generations experience later life? In less than 20 years, the number (...) at risk. HealthHousing The majority of people continue to live in mainstream houses as they grow older, rather than moving into specialist accommodation, and increasing numbers of over 50s are renting. Yet UK housing stock is by and large unsuitable for people to grow old in.The State of Ageing in 2019 Adding life to our years 27 Housing With 38% of our homes dating from before 1946 (21% from before 1919), and just 7% from after 2000, the UK has the oldest housing stock in the EU. 69 Unsurprisingly

2020 The Centre for Ageing Better

907. Efficacy, safety, and tolerability of mirabegron in patients aged >/=65yr with overactive bladder wet: a phase IV, double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled study (PILLAR)

. Safety and tolerability were consistent with the known mirabegron safety profile. Conclusions: Mirabegron efficacy, safety, and tolerability over 12 wk were confirmed in patients aged ≥65yr with OAB and incontinence. Patient summary: We examined the effect of mirabegron compared with placebo in people aged 65yr or older with overactive bladder and incontinence. Mirabegron improved the symptoms of overactive bladder compared with placebo. Side effects were similar to those already known for mirabegron (...) of Mirabegron in Patients Aged ≥65yr With Overactive Bladder Wet: A Phase IV, Double-Blind, Randomised, Placebo-Controlled Study (PILLAR) Adrian Wagg et al. Eur Urol . Feb 2020 Show details Eur Urol Actions , 77 (2), 211-220 Authors , , , , , Affiliations 1 Geriatric Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. Electronic address: adrian.wagg@ualberta.ca. 2 Division of Urology, St Elizabeth's Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA. 3 Bayview Research Group, LLC, Valley Village, CA, USA. 4 Sunnybrook

2020 EvidenceUpdates

908. State of Ageing 2019 infographics

and Chelsea Disability free life expectancy Total life expectancySource: +"CFMMBOE/"NJO4NJUIFUBM 5IF%ZOBNJDTPG"HF JOH &WJEFODFGSPNUIF&OHMJTI-POHJUVEJOBM4UVEZPG"HFJOH 8BWF 1 in 5 people aged 55-64 have a health problem that limits the kind of work they can doSource: +"CFMMBOE/"NJO4NJUIFUBM 5IF%ZOBNJDTPG"HF JOH &WJEFODFGSPNUIF&OHMJTI-POHJUVEJOBM4UVEZPG"HFJOH 8BWF More than a quarter of the poorest men aged 50 and over are smokers, compared to 5% of the wealthiest 27% 5% 5% 19% 1 oor FTURu J O UJMe 8 FB (...) &WJEFODFGSPNUIF&OHMJTI-POHJUVEJOBM4UVEZPG"HFJOH 8BWF Compared to the wealthiest quintile, the poorest quintile of men aged 50 and over are: 3x 2x 2x NPr FMJ L e M Z U o h B W e chronic heart disease N or FMJ L e M Z U o h B W e Type 2 diabetes N or FMJ L e M Z U o h BWe arthritis4PVSDF0tDFPG/BUJPOBM4UBUJTUJDT .FBTVSJOHOBUJPOBMXFMMCFJOH EPNBJOTBOENFBTVSFT CBTFE - POFMJOFTTB T FDUT QFPQMFP GBMMBHFT 8% 6% 5% 3% 3% 25 to 34 year olds 50 to 64 year olds 35 to 49 year olds 65 to 74 year olds 75 and over

2020 The Centre for Ageing Better

909. Measuring ageing: An introduction to the Ageing Better Measures Framework

Better 2019 Local monitoring and evaluation We are also making use of the ABMF at a local level. We are working with the Greater Manchester Combined Authority, Leeds City Council and Leeds Older People’s Forum, supporting them, as well as other members of the UK Network of Age-Friendly Communities, in their use of data and measures to understand local experiences of ageing and monitor progress. We look forward to continuing to work with these and other partners interested in measuring what matters (...) Measuring ageing: An introduction to the Ageing Better Measures Framework Measuring ageing: An introduction to the Ageing Better Measures Framework Centre for Ageing Better January 20193 © Centre for Ageing Better 2019 About the Centre for Ageing Better The Centre for Ageing Better is a charity, funded by an endowment from The National Lottery Community Fund, working to create a society where everyone enjoys a good later life. We want more people to be in fulfilling work, in good health, living

2020 The Centre for Ageing Better

910. Preventing respiratory illness in older adults aged 60 years and above living in long-term care

Preventing respiratory illness in older adults aged 60 years and above living in long-term care Preventing respiratory illness in older adults aged 60 years and above living in long-term care - CEBM CEBM The Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine develops, promotes and disseminates better evidence for healthcare. Navigate this website Preventing respiratory illness in older adults aged 60 years and above living in long-term care March 28, 2020 Patricia Rios, Amruta Radhakrishnan, Sonia M. Thomas (...) ) or mixed evidence of effectiveness (e.g., rimantadine, zanamivir, hand hygiene, personal protective equipment). The mixed evidence on hand hygiene and use of personal protective equipment does not imply these should not be used in outbreaks BACKGROUND The Infection Prevention & Control of the World Health Organization (WHO) Health Emergency Programme commissioned a review on preventing and managing COVID-19 in older adults aged 60 years and above living in long-term care facilities. The overall

2020 Oxford COVID-19 Evidence Service

911. Guidelines for preventing respiratory illness in older adults aged 60 years and above living in long-term care

Guidelines for preventing respiratory illness in older adults aged 60 years and above living in long-term care Guidelines for preventing respiratory illness in older adults aged 60 years and above living in long-term care - CEBM CEBM The Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine develops, promotes and disseminates better evidence for healthcare. Navigate this website Guidelines for preventing respiratory illness in older adults aged 60 years and above living in long-term care March 28, 2020 Patricia (...) , these recommendations should be viewed with caution as it is unclear how many of these guidelines are based on the best available evidence due to their poor overall quality. BACKGROUND The Infection Prevention & Control of the World Health Organization (WHO) Health Emergency Programme commissioned a review on preventing and managing COVID-19 in older adults aged 60 years and above living in long-term care facilities. The overall objective of this rapid review of clinical practice guidelines was to identify

2020 Oxford COVID-19 Evidence Service

912. COVID-19 and medicines advice for older people

COVID-19 and medicines advice for older people COVID-19 and medicines advice for older people | British Geriatrics Society Toggle main menu visibility Search Search Search COVID-19 and medicines advice for older people Stay at home advice: Feedback on this resource? Email If you’d like us to contact you, please leave your email Your feedback * CAPTCHA This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions. Other resources in this series (...) Contact us British Geriatrics Society Marjory Warren House 31 St John’s Square London EC1M 4DN Tel: +44 (0)20 7608 1369 Fax: +44 (0)20 7608 1041 Quick links Follow us Sign up for our e-bulletin Built by

2020 British Geriatrics Society

913. COVID-19: Geriatric basics for non-specialists

COVID-19: Geriatric basics for non-specialists COVID-19: Geriatric basics for non-specialists | British Geriatrics Society Toggle main menu visibility Search Search Search COVID-19: Geriatric basics for non-specialists Delirium Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) External materials These materials have been developed by external organisations for people who are not necessarily specialists in geriatric medicine or the healthcare of older people and may be of use in some clinical and non (...) . Current advice Other resources in this series Contact us British Geriatrics Society Marjory Warren House 31 St John’s Square London EC1M 4DN Tel: +44 (0)20 7608 1369 Fax: +44 (0)20 7608 1041 Quick links Follow us Sign up for our e-bulletin Built by

2020 British Geriatrics Society

914. COVID-19: Rapidly managing pneumonia in older people during a pandemic

adults is preferable to treating it. Identification of the early stages of pneumonia in older patients can prove difficult. Traditional symptoms and signs, including fever, may be absent. Limited evidence suggests that many tests that are useful in younger patients do not help . The onset of pneumonia in elderly people can often be rapid, and the prognosis is poor in severe pneumonia: The older you are, the more prevalent becomes. Patients in appear to fare even worse, as they often have several (...) comorbidities and poor nutritional status and are often physically inactive. In-hospital mortality is significantly higher, even after adjusting for age and sex. Common causative organisms in elderly people admitted to hospital with pneumonia include Streptococcus pneumoniae and Mycoplasma pneumoniae . Less commonly, Haemophilus influenzae and Staphylococcus aureus may be responsible. In severe pneumonia, S. aureus , Klebsiella pneumoniae , and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are common causative organisms

2020 Oxford COVID-19 Evidence Service

915. COVID-19: The relationship between age, comorbidity, and disease severity – a rapid review

of COVID-19 than among those who survive. However, as chronic diseases are more common among older people, it is difficult to determine whether the increased risk among the elderly is due to comorbidity, age, or a combination of these factors. Age and/or comorbidity? We identified three studies analysing multiple risk factors using multivariate mod- els, but the results do not provide clear answers as to whether age or comorbidity is the most important risk factor for serious illness. It seems (...) ] OR Neoplasms[mh]OR can- cer*[tw] OR immunosuppress*[tw] OR Aged[mh] OR "Middle Aged"[mh] OR "Young Adult"[mh] OR "age group"[tw] OR "age groups"[tw] OR elderly[tw] OR aged[tw] OR middleaged[tw] OR "old people"[tw])) AND systematic[sb] 4 hits Main search, PubMed – age groups, without demarcation on publication type: ((((Coronavirus[mh] OR "Coronavirus Infections"[mh] OR "corona virus"[tw] OR coro- navirus[tw] OR coronovirus[tw]) AND (novel[tw]OR 2019[tw] OR Wuhan[tw])) OR "COVID-19"[tw] OR COVID19[tw

2020 Norwegian Institute of Public Health

916. Guidelines for preventing respiratory illness in older adults aged 60 years and above living in long-term care: A rapid review of clinical practice guidelines

Guidelines for preventing respiratory illness in older adults aged 60 years and above living in long-term care: A rapid review of clinical practice guidelines Guidelines for preventing respiratory illness in older adults aged 60 years and above living in long-term care: A rapid review of clinical practice guidelines | medRxiv Search for this keyword Guidelines for preventing respiratory illness in older adults aged 60 years and above living in long-term care: A rapid review of clinical practice (...) of Toronto For correspondence: Abstract Background: The overall objective of this rapid review was to identify infection protection and control recommendations from published clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) for adults aged 60 years and older in long-term care settings Methods: Comprehensive searches in MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and relevant CPG publishers/repositories were carried out in early March 2020. Title/abstract and full-text screening, data abstraction, and quality appraisal

2020 Covid-19 Ad hoc guidelines

917. COVID-19: The relationship between age, comorbidity and disease severity – a rapid review

of different comorbidi- ties, but a study by Petrilli and co-workers contributes valuable data. The authors followed a cohort consisting of 4103 patients with COVID-19, and explored charac- teristics of patients admitted to hospital. They found that the risk of hospitalisation increased with age: Compared to patients between 19 and 44 years old, the odds ra- tio (OR) was 4.17 (95% CI 3.35 to 5.2) for people between 55 and 64, 10.91 (95% CI 8.35 to 14.34) for people between 65 and 74, and 66.79 (44.73 (...) -102.62) for people aged 75 or older. High BMI, heart failure, chronic kidney disease, diabetes and male gender were identified as independent predictors of hospitalisation (Table 1). Table 1 Studies assessing risk factors predicting more severe disease Reference Outcome Factors tested Factors included in multivariate model Dong et al (10) N=135 China Mild vs Severe course NA # Age Comorbidity OR 1.04 (1.01-1.97) OR 1.7 (1.1-2.8) Hu et al (11) N=323 China Favorable vs. unfavorable§ Age, BMI, CVD

2020 Norwegian Institute of Public Health

918. Meta-analyses of the n-back working memory task: fMRI evidence of age-related changes in prefrontal cortex involvement across the adult lifespan. (Abstract)

activity from healthy adults in three age-groups: young (23.57 ± 5.63 years), middle-aged (38.13 ± 5.63 years) and older (66.86 ± 5.70 years) adults. Findings show that the three groups share concordance in the engagement of parietal and cingulate cortices, which have been consistently identified as core areas involved in working memory; as well as the insula, claustrum, and cerebellum, which have not been highlighted as areas involved in working memory. Critically, prefrontal cortex engagement (...) is concordant for young, to a lesser degree for middle-aged adults, and absent in older adults, suggesting a gradual linear decline in concordance of prefrontal cortex engagement. Our results provide important new knowledge for improving methodology and theories of cognition across the lifespan.Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

2020 NeuroImage

919. COVID-19 and the ‘old-fashioned’ idea of neighbourhoods

COVID-19 and the ‘old-fashioned’ idea of neighbourhoods COVID-19 and the ‘old-fashioned’ idea of neighbourhoods - CEBM CEBM The Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine develops, promotes and disseminates better evidence for healthcare. Navigate this website COVID-19 and the ‘old-fashioned’ idea of neighbourhoods June 8, 2020 Dr Patrícia Canelas Departmental Lecturer, Sustainable Urban Development Programme, University of Oxford Dr Idalina Baptista Associate Professor, Sustainable Urban Development

2020 Oxford COVID-19 Evidence Service

920. Mortality Implications of Prediabetes and Diabetes in Older Adults

delegates due to an error Add Cancel Actions Cite Share Permalink Copy Page navigation Diabetes Care Actions , 43 (2), 382-388 Feb 2020 Mortality Implications of Prediabetes and Diabetes in Older Adults , , , , , , , Affiliations Expand Affiliations 1 Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD. 2 Division of Cardiology and National Institute for Prevention and Cardiovascular Health, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland. 3 Department of Geriatric (...) @jhu.edu. PMID: 31776141 PMCID: (available on 2021-02-01 ) DOI: Item in Clipboard Full-text links Cite Abstract Objective: Diabetes in older age is heterogeneous, and the treatment approach varies by patient characteristics. We characterized the short-term all-cause and cardiovascular mortality risk associated with hyperglycemia in older age. Research design and methods: We included 5,791 older adults in the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study who attended visit 5 (2011-2013; ages 66-90 years

2020 EvidenceUpdates