Latest & greatest articles for falls

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on falls or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on falls and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for falls

21. Fall Prevention Guidelines for Patients in Wheelchairs or Patients with Delirium: A Review of Evidence-Based Guidelines

Fall Prevention Guidelines for Patients in Wheelchairs or Patients with Delirium: A Review of Evidence-Based Guidelines Fall Prevention Guidelines for Patients in Wheelchairs or Patients with Delirium: A Review of Evidence-Based Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Fall Prevention Guidelines for Patients in Wheelchairs or Patients with Delirium: A Review of Evidence-Based Guidelines Fall Prevention Guidelines for Patients in Wheelchairs or Patients with Delirium: A Review (...) of Evidence-Based Guidelines Last updated: July 19, 2019 Project Number: RC1159-000 Product Line: Research Type: Devices and Systems Report Type: Summary with Critical Appraisal Result type: Report Question What are the evidence based guidelines to prevent falls for older adults requiring wheelchairs in institutionalized care? What are the evidence based guidelines to prevent falls for adult patients with delirium in institutionalized care? Key Message One evidence-based guideline was included

2019 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

22. Walkers with Wheels Versus Walkers Without Wheels for Fall Prevention in Older Adults: A Review of the Comparative Clinical Effectiveness

Walkers with Wheels Versus Walkers Without Wheels for Fall Prevention in Older Adults: A Review of the Comparative Clinical Effectiveness Walkers with Wheels Versus Walkers Without Wheels for Fall Prevention in Older Adults: A Review of the Comparative Clinical Effectiveness | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Walkers with Wheels Versus Walkers Without Wheels for Fall Prevention in Older Adults: A Review of the Comparative Clinical Effectiveness Walkers with Wheels Versus Walkers Without (...) Wheels for Fall Prevention in Older Adults: A Review of the Comparative Clinical Effectiveness Last updated: July 22, 2019 Project Number: RC1160-000 Product Line: Research Type: Devices and Systems Report Type: Summary with Critical Appraisal Result type: Report Question What is the comparative clinical effectiveness of preventing falls in older adults using walkers with wheels versus walkers without wheels? Key Message One systematic review was identified regarding the comparative effectiveness

2019 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

23. Rate or Rhythm Control in Older Atrial Fibrillation Patients: Risk of Fall-Related Injuries and Syncope Full Text available with Trip Pro

Rate or Rhythm Control in Older Atrial Fibrillation Patients: Risk of Fall-Related Injuries and Syncope Management of atrial fibrillation (AF) with rate and/or rhythm control could lead to fall-related injuries and syncope, especially in the older AF population. We aimed to determine the association of rate and/or rhythm control with fall-related injuries and syncope in a real-world older AF cohort.A retrospective cohort study.Danish nationwide administrative registries from 2000 to 2015 (...) .A total of 100 935 patients with AF aged 65 years or older claiming prescription of rate-lowering drugs (RLDs) and/or anti-arrhythmic drugs (AADs) were included. We compared the use of rate-lowering monotherapy with rate-lowering dual therapy, AAD monotherapy, and AAD combined with rate-lowering therapy.Outcomes were fall-related injuries and syncope as a composite end point (primary) or separate end point (secondary).In this population, the median age was 78 years (interquartile range [IQR] = 72-84 y

2019 EvidenceUpdates

24. Preventing falls in people with learning disabilities

Preventing falls in people with learning disabilities Preventing falls in people with learning disabilities - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. Accept cookies You’ve accepted all cookies. You can at any time. Hide Search Guidance Preventing falls in people with learning disabilities To help public health, health professionals, paid social care staff and family members to prevent falls in people with learning disabilities. Published 19 August 2019 From: Documents HTML If you (...) use assistive technology (such as a screen reader) and need a version of this document in a more accessible format, please email . Please tell us what format you need. It will help us if you say what assistive technology you use. Details This guide contains information to help staff in public health, health services and social care to prevent falls in people with learning disabilities. It is also intended to help falls prevention services to provide support that is accessible to people

2019 Public Health England

25. Effect of Vitamin K2 on Postural Sway in Older People Who Fall: A Randomized Controlled Trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of Vitamin K2 on Postural Sway in Older People Who Fall: A Randomized Controlled Trial Vitamin K is thought to be involved in both bone health and maintenance of neuromuscular function. We tested the effect of vitamin K2 supplementation on postural sway, falls, healthcare costs, and indices of physical function in older people at risk of falls.Parallel-group double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial.Fourteen primary care practices in Scotland, UK.A total of 95 community-dwelling (...) participants aged 65 and older with at least two falls, or one injurious fall, in the previous year.Once/day placebo, 200 μg or 400 μg of oral vitamin K2 for 1 year.The primary outcome was anteroposterior sway measured using sway plates at 12 months, adjusted for baseline. Secondary outcomes included the Short Physical Performance Battery, Berg Balance Scale, Timed Up & Go Test, quality of life, health and social care costs, falls, and adverse events.Mean participant age was 75 (standard deviation [SD] = 7

2019 EvidenceUpdates

26. Effect of a Home-Based Exercise Program on Subsequent Falls Among Community-Dwelling High-Risk Older Adults After a Fall: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of a Home-Based Exercise Program on Subsequent Falls Among Community-Dwelling High-Risk Older Adults After a Fall: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Whether exercise reduces subsequent falls in high-risk older adults who have already experienced a fall is unknown.To assess the effect of a home-based exercise program as a fall prevention strategy in older adults who were referred to a fall prevention clinic after an index fall.A 12-month, single-blind, randomized clinical trial conducted from (...) April 22, 2009, to June 5, 2018, among adults aged at least 70 years who had a fall within the past 12 months and were recruited from a fall prevention clinic.Participants were randomized to receive usual care plus a home-based strength and balance retraining exercise program delivered by a physical therapist (intervention group; n = 173) or usual care, consisting of fall prevention care provided by a geriatrician (usual care group; n = 172). Both were provided for 12 months.The primary outcome

2019 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

27. The rise and fall of aspirin in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Full Text available with Trip Pro

The rise and fall of aspirin in the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease. Aspirin is one of the most frequently used drugs worldwide and is generally considered effective for the secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease. By contrast, the role of aspirin in primary prevention of cardiovascular disease is controversial. Early trials evaluating aspirin for primary prevention, done before the turn of the millennium, suggested reductions in myocardial infarction and stroke (although

2019 Lancet

28. Effectiveness of Tai Ji Quan vs Multimodal and Stretching Exercise Interventions for Reducing Injurious Falls in Older Adults at High Risk of Falling: Follow-up Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effectiveness of Tai Ji Quan vs Multimodal and Stretching Exercise Interventions for Reducing Injurious Falls in Older Adults at High Risk of Falling: Follow-up Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial Exercise has been shown to reduce injurious falls in older adults. Evidence, however, is lacking regarding the types of intervention that are most effective in preventing injurious falls among older adults at high risk of falling.To determine the longer-term effectiveness of therapeutic tai ji (...) quan intervention vs multimodal exercise and stretching exercise in decreasing injurious falls among older adults at high risk of falling.This trial involves a prespecified analysis with the data analyzed by intent-to-treat. Follow-up analysis of a single-blind randomized trial conducted in community settings of 7 urban and suburban cities in Oregon from February 20, 2015, to September 15, 2018, compared a therapeutic tai ji quan intervention with multimodal exercise and stretching exercise

2019 EvidenceUpdates

29. Vitamin D and Falls in Older African American Women: The PODA Randomized Clinical Trial (Abstract)

Vitamin D and Falls in Older African American Women: The PODA Randomized Clinical Trial Limited information is available on the influence of vitamin D on falls in older high-functioning black American women. Endocrine Society guidelines propose serum 25(OH)D levels over 30 ng/mL.To determine if maintenance of serum 25(OH)D above 30 ng/mL protects against falls.The Physical Performance, Osteoporosis and Vitamin D in African American Women (PODA) trial had a prospective, randomized, placebo (...) -controlled, double-dummy design with two arms: one with placebo and one with vitamin D3 adjusted to maintain serum 25(OH)D above 30 ng/mL. The primary outcomes were the prevention of bone loss and the decline in physical performance.The target population was healthy black women older than 60 years with serum 25(OH)D between 8 and 26 ng/mL. The trial was 3 years in duration with a falls questionnaire administered every 3 months. A total of 260 women entered the study, and 184 completed the 3 years. Mean

2019 EvidenceUpdates

30. Risk factors for in hospital falls

Risk factors for in hospital falls Rapid Literature Review – Risk Factors for Falls in hospital. 1 Risk factors for in hospital falls Citation Fiona Clay, Gillian Yap and Angela Melder. 2018. Risk factors for in hospital falls: Evidence Review. Centre for Clinical Effectiveness, Monash Health, Melbourne, Australia Contact CCE@monashhealth.org Executive Summary Background The Falls Committee has requested CCE provide a review of the evidence on risk factors for falls sustained in hospital (...) . The high prevalence of falls and injury rate co-occur with substantial healthcare costs. [1] Moreover, older adults often experience a decline in functional status and social activities after a fall and report a reduced quality of life. [2] The purpose of this is review is to better understand drivers for the increasing falls rate at Monash Health. Objective To identify the risk factors associated with an increased risk of falls in the hospital setting. Search Strategy Scientific and grey literature

2019 Monash Health Evidence Reviews

31. Dual-Task Exercise Reduces Cognitive-Motor Interference in Walking and Falls After Stroke Full Text available with Trip Pro

Dual-Task Exercise Reduces Cognitive-Motor Interference in Walking and Falls After Stroke Background and Purpose- Functional community ambulation requires the ability to perform mobility and cognitive task simultaneously (dual-tasking). This single-blinded randomized controlled study aimed to examine the effects of dual-task exercise in chronic stroke patients. Methods- Eighty-four chronic stroke patients (24 women; age, 61.2±6.4 years; time since stroke onset, 75.3±64.9 months) with mild (...) during serial-3-subtractions and verbal fluency task. Secondary outcomes included the Activities-specific Balance Confidence Scale, Frenchay Activities Index, and Stroke-specific Quality of Life Scale. The above outcomes were measured at baseline, immediately after, and 8 weeks after training. Fall incidence was recorded for a 6-month period posttraining. Results- Only the dual-task group exhibited reduced dual-task interference in walking time posttraining (forward walking combined with verbal

2019 EvidenceUpdates

32. A combined physical activity and fall prevention intervention improved mobility-related goal attainment but not physical activity in older adults: a randomised trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

A combined physical activity and fall prevention intervention improved mobility-related goal attainment but not physical activity in older adults: a randomised trial In people aged ≥ 60 years, does a combined physical activity and fall prevention intervention affect physical activity and mobility-related goal attainment? Does the combined intervention also improve fall rates, daily steps, the proportion of people meeting the physical activity guidelines, quality of life, mood, fear of falling (...) , and mobility limitation?Randomised trial with concealed allocation, intention-to-treat analysis and assessor blinding.One hundred and thirty-one people living in the community and aged ≥ 60 years.The experimental group received one physiotherapist visit, fortnightly telephone-based health coaching, a pedometer, tailored fall prevention advice, and a fall prevention brochure. The control group received the same fall prevention brochure.Primary outcomes were mobility goal attainment (Goal Attainment Scale

2019 EvidenceUpdates

33. Effects of a falls prevention exercise programme on health-related quality of life in older home care recipients: a randomised controlled trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effects of a falls prevention exercise programme on health-related quality of life in older home care recipients: a randomised controlled trial falls have serious consequences for quality of life (QOL) and contribute substantially to the global burden of disease. Home care is an important arena to address falls prevention and QOL, but this vulnerable group of older adults is underrepresented in health research. This study explores the effects of a falls prevention exercise programme on health (...) -related quality of life (HRQOL), physical function and falls self-efficacy in older fallers receiving home care.the study design is a parallel-group randomised controlled trial. The intervention group performed a falls prevention programme based on the Otago Exercise Programme (OEP). The control group received usual care. 155 participants were recruited from primary health care in six Norwegian municipalities. Local physiotherapists supervised the programme. The primary outcome, HRQOL, was measured

2019 EvidenceUpdates

34. Decreasing Fear of Falling in Chronic Stroke Survivors Through Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Task-Oriented Training Full Text available with Trip Pro

Decreasing Fear of Falling in Chronic Stroke Survivors Through Cognitive Behavior Therapy and Task-Oriented Training Background and Purpose- Research has shown that balance training is effective for reducing the fear of falling in individuals with a history of stroke. In this study, we evaluated (1) whether cognitive behavior therapy could augment the beneficial effects of task-oriented balance training (TOBT) in reducing the fear of falling in chronic stroke survivors and (2) whether it could (...) , in turn, reduce fear-avoidance behavior and improve related health outcomes. Methods- Eighty-nine cognitively intact subjects with mildly impaired balance ability were randomized into the following 2 groups that underwent 90-minutes interventions 2 days per week for 8 weeks: (1) cognitive behavior therapy + TOBT or (2) general health education + TOBT (control). The primary outcome was the fear of falling, and the secondary outcomes were fear-avoidance behavior, balance, fall risk, independent daily

2019 EvidenceUpdates

35. Visually Impaired OLder people's Exercise programme for falls prevenTion (VIOLET): a feasibility study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Visually Impaired OLder people's Exercise programme for falls prevenTion (VIOLET): a feasibility study Visually Impaired OLder people's Exercise programme for falls prevenTion (VIOLET): a feasibility study Journals Library An error occurred retrieving content to display, please try again. >> >> >> Page Not Found Page not found (404) Sorry - the page you requested could not be found. Please choose a page from the navigation or try a website search above to find the information you need (...) . >> >> >> >> Issue {{metadata .Issue }} Toolkit 1)"> 0)"> 1)"> {{metadata.Title}} {{metadata.Headline}} This feasibility study adapted an exercise programme for preventing falls specifically for visually impaired older people, and while the pilot RCT showed no impact on fear of falling, the study made recommendations for a future trial. {{author}} {{($index , , , , , , , , , , , , & . Nicola Adams 1, * , Dawn Skelton 2 , Cathy Bailey 1 , Denise Howel 3 , Dorothy Coe 1 , Rosy Lampitt 4 , Jennifer Wilkinson 4

2019 NIHR HTA programme

36. Assessment of falls in the elderly

Assessment of falls in the elderly Assessment of falls in the elderly - Differential diagnosis of symptoms | BMJ Best Practice You'll need a subscription to access all of BMJ Best Practice Search  Assessment of falls in the elderly Last reviewed: February 2019 Last updated: January 2019 Summary Falls are often multifactorial in origin. Deandrea S. Risk factors for falls in community-dwelling older people: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Epidemiology. 2010 Sep;21(5):658-68. http (...) ://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20585256?tool=bestpractice.com The presence of the following factors is associated with greater probability of future falls, Rubenstein LZ, Josephson KR. Falls and their prevention in elderly people: what does the evidence show? Med Clin North Am. 2006 Sep;90(5):807-24. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16962843?tool=bestpractice.com McInnes L, Gibbons E, Chandler-Oatts J. Clinical practice guideline for the assessment and prevention of falls in older people. Worldviews Evid Based Nurs

2019 BMJ Best Practice

37. Effect of a Multistrain Probiotic on Cognitive Function and Risk of Falls in Patients With Cirrhosis: A Randomized Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of a Multistrain Probiotic on Cognitive Function and Risk of Falls in Patients With Cirrhosis: A Randomized Trial. Probiotics can modulate gut microbiota, intestinal permeability, and immune response and could therefore improve cognitive dysfunction and help avoid potential consequences, such as falls, in patients with cirrhosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a multistrain probiotic on cognitive function, risk of falls, and inflammatory response in patients (...) with cirrhosis. Consecutive outpatients with cirrhosis and cognitive dysfunction (defined by a Psychometric Hepatic Encephalopathy Score [PHES] < -4) and/or falls in the previous year were randomized to receive either a sachet of a high-concentration multistrain probiotic containing 450 billion bacteria twice daily for 12 weeks or placebo. We evaluated the changes in cognitive function (PHES); risk of falls (Timed Up and Go [TUG] test, gait speed, and incidence of falls); systemic inflammatory response

2019 Hepatology communications Controlled trial quality: uncertain

38. Protocol for serious fall injury adjudication in the Strategies to Reduce Injuries and Develop Confidence in Elders (STRIDE) study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Protocol for serious fall injury adjudication in the Strategies to Reduce Injuries and Develop Confidence in Elders (STRIDE) study. This paper describes a protocol for determining the incidence of serious fall injuries for Strategies to Reduce Injuries and Develop Confidence in Elders (STRIDE), a large, multicenter pragmatic clinical trial with limited resources for event adjudication. We describe how administrative data (from participating health systems and Medicare claims) can be used (...) to confirm participant-reported events, with more time- and resource-intensive full-text medical record data used only on an "as-needed" basis.STRIDE is a pragmatic cluster-randomized controlled trial involving 5451 participants age ≥ 70 and at increased risk for falls, served by 86 primary care practices in 10 US health systems. The STRIDE intervention involves a nurse falls care manager who assesses a participant's underlying risks for falls, suggests interventions using motivational interviewing

2019 Injury epidemiology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

39. Care of the older person: Evaluating falls prevention strategies in community settings: marginal reduction on rate of falls with individual risk-based multifactorial interventions compared to ‘usual care’

Care of the older person: Evaluating falls prevention strategies in community settings: marginal reduction on rate of falls with individual risk-based multifactorial interventions compared to ‘usual care’ Evaluating falls prevention strategies in community settings: marginal reduction on rate of falls with individual risk-based multifactorial interventions compared to ‘usual care’ | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you (...) Evaluating falls prevention strategies in community settings: marginal reduction on rate of falls with individual risk-based multifactorial interventions compared to ‘usual care’ Article Text Commentary Care of the older person Evaluating falls prevention strategies in community settings: marginal reduction on rate of falls with individual risk-based multifactorial interventions compared to ‘usual care’ Amanda Lee , Mark Hayter Statistics from Altmetric.com Commentary on: Hopewell S, Adedire O, Copsey BJ

2019 Evidence-Based Nursing

40. Primary care: Vitamin D does not prevent fractures and falls

Primary care: Vitamin D does not prevent fractures and falls Vitamin D does not prevent fractures and falls | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You (...) are here Vitamin D does not prevent fractures and falls Article Text EBM Verdict Primary care Vitamin D does not prevent fractures and falls Carl Heneghan 1 , Kamal R Mahtani 2 Statistics from Altmetric.com Whether vitamin D improves bone health has been unclear—that is until now. Early evidence suggested benefit, but a recent systemic review concludes there is no effect on fractures, falls or bone mineral density in primary prevention. EBM Verdict EBM Verdict on: effects of vitamin D supplementation

2019 Evidence-Based Medicine