Latest & greatest articles for hepatitis

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Top results for hepatitis

81. Clinical outcomes in patients with chronic hepatitis C after direct-acting antiviral treatment: a prospective cohort study. (Abstract)

Clinical outcomes in patients with chronic hepatitis C after direct-acting antiviral treatment: a prospective cohort study. Although direct-acting antivirals have been used extensively to treat patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, their clinical effectiveness has not been well reported. We compared the incidence of death, hepatocellular carcinoma, and decompensated cirrhosis between patients treated with direct-acting antivirals and those untreated, in the French ANRS CO22 (...) Hepather cohort.We did a prospective study in adult patients with chronic HCV infection enrolled from 32 expert hepatology centres in France. We excluded patients with chronic hepatitis B, those with a history of decompensated cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, or liver transplantation, and patients who were treated with interferon-ribavirin with or without first-generation protease inhibitors. Co-primary study outcomes were incidence of all-cause mortality, hepatocellular carcinoma

2019 Lancet

82. Scaling up prevention and treatment towards the elimination of hepatitis C: a global mathematical model. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Scaling up prevention and treatment towards the elimination of hepatitis C: a global mathematical model. The revolution in hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment through the development of direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) has generated international interest in the global elimination of the disease as a public health threat. In 2017, this led WHO to establish elimination targets for 2030. We evaluated the impact of public health interventions on the global HCV epidemic and investigated whether WHO's

2019 Lancet

83. Chloroquine Is Effective for Maintenance of Remission in Autoimmune Hepatitis: Controlled, Double-Blind, Randomized Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Chloroquine Is Effective for Maintenance of Remission in Autoimmune Hepatitis: Controlled, Double-Blind, Randomized Trial. Between 50% and 86% of patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) relapse after immunosuppression withdrawal; long-term immunosuppression is associated with increased risk of neoplasias and infections. Chloroquine diphosphate (CQ) is an immunomodulatory drug that reduces the risk of flares in rheumatologic diseases. Our aims were to investigate the efficacy and safety of CQ

2019 Hepatology communications Controlled trial quality: predicted high

84. Public health guidance on HIV, hepatitis B and C testing in the EU/EEA

Public health guidance on HIV, hepatitis B and C testing in the EU/EEA SCIENTIFIC AD VICE www.ecdc.europa.eu Public health guidance on HIV, hepatitis B and C testing in the EU/EEA An integrated approachECDC SCIENTIFIC ADVICE Public health guidance on HIV, hepatitis B and C testing in the EU/EEA An integrated approach ii This guidance was commissioned by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC), coordinated by Andrew J Amato-Gauci and Lara Tavoschi with the support of Helena (...) Kingdom Masoud Dara, World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Europe, Denmark Michael Ninburg, World Hepatitis Alliance, United Kingdom Mika Salminen, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland Mojca Maticic, University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Slovenia Nikos Dedes, EATG/Positive Voice, Greece Peter Vickerman, University of Bristol, United Kingdom Philippa Easterbrook, WHO, Switzerland Raj Patel, IUSTI/NHS England, United Kingdom Ruta Kaupe, DIA+LOGS, Latvia Slim Fourati, European

2019 European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control - Public Health Guidance

85. Public health guidance in brief on HIV, hepatitis B and C testing in the EU/EEA

Public health guidance in brief on HIV, hepatitis B and C testing in the EU/EEA Suggested citation: European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control. Public health guidance in brief on HIV, hepatitis B and C testing in the EU/EEA – An integrated approach. Stockholm: ECDC; 2018. Stockholm, December 2018 Reproduction is authorised, provided the source is acknowledged. PDF Print ISBN 978-92-9498-291-9 ISBN 978-92-9498-292-6 DOI 10.2900/809892 DOI 10.2900/579896 Catalogue number TQ-06-18-361-EN-N (...) Catalogue number TQ-06-18-361-EN-C © European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, Stockholm, 2018 Scope and purpose of guidance The ECDC guidance on integrated testing of hepatitis B (HBV), hepatitis C (HCV) and HIV supports countries in the global effort to combat viral hepatitis and eliminate HIV as public health threats by 2030. At present, reaching and testing those at risk of infection with HIV, HBV or HCV is still a public health challenge across Europe. Figure 1. The case for integrated

2019 European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control - Public Health Guidance

86. Direct-acting antivirals for chronic hepatitis C: risk of hypoglycaemia in patients with diabetes Full Text available with Trip Pro

Direct-acting antivirals for chronic hepatitis C: risk of hypoglycaemia in patients with diabetes Direct-acting antivirals for chronic hepatitis C: risk of hypoglycaemia in patients with diabetes - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. Search Direct-acting antivirals for chronic hepatitis C: risk of hypoglycaemia in patients with diabetes Monitor glucose levels closely in patients with diabetes during direct-acting antiviral therapy for hepatitis C, particularly within the first (...) 3 months of treatment, and modify diabetes medication or doses when necessary. Patients with diabetes may experience symptomatic hypoglycaemia if diabetic treatment is continued at the same dose due to potential for an enhanced hypoglycaemic effect. Published 18 December 2018 From: Therapeutic area: , , Contents Advice for healthcare professionals: rapid reduction in hepatitis C viral load during direct-acting antiviral therapy for hepatitis C may lead to improvements in glucose metabolism

2019 MHRA Drug Safety Update

87. Hepatitis C: Who should I test for hepatitis C?

Hepatitis C: Who should I test for hepatitis C? Who to screen/test | Diagnosis | Hepatitis C | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Who to screen/test Hepatitis C: Who should I test for hepatitis C? Last revised in April 2020 Who should I test for hepatitis C? Offer hepatitis screening to asymptomatic people who are at high risk of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. People who have ever injected drugs. People who received a blood transfusion before 1991 or blood products before 1986, when screening (...) of blood donors for hepatitis C infection, or heat treatment for inactivation of viruses were introduced. People born or brought up in a country with an intermediate or high prevalence (2% or greater) of chronic hepatitis C, including Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Central and South America, Eastern and Southern Europe, the Middle East, and the Pacific islands. Babies born to mothers infected with hepatitis C. Prisoners, including young offenders. Looked-after children and young people, including those

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

88. Hepatitis C: How should I test for hepatitis C?

Hepatitis C: How should I test for hepatitis C? How to test | Diagnosis | Hepatitis C | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu How to test Hepatitis C: How should I test for hepatitis C? Last revised in April 2020 How should I test for hepatitis C? A lengthy pre-test discussion is not needed unless the person requests it. Ask about exposure to , and ask about when the last known risk activity took place (to help establish the 'window period' 3–6 months from the time of last possible exposure). Be aware (...) on measures to reduce the risk of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. If the test is positive, can reduce the risk of and ensure that infection is not transmitted to contacts. Discuss details of how the result will be given, and ask about available support if the result is positive. Check you have correct contact details and know how the person prefers to be contacted. Arrange an appointment for the result to be given, if possible. HCV infection is diagnosed with an antibody test (which indicates

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

89. Hepatitis C

Hepatitis C Hepatitis C | Topics A to Z | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Hepatitis C Hepatitis C Last revised in April 2020 Hepatitis C is a slow, progressive disease of the liver caused by infection with the blood-borne hepatitis C virus (HCV). Diagnosis Management Background information Hepatitis C: Summary Hepatitis C infection is a slow, progressive disease of the liver caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It is an important, underdiagnosed, and undertreated cause of morbidity and mortality (...) transfusion (pre 1990s), re-use or inadequate sterilization of medical equipment, needlestick injury, and exposure to infected blood by other means (for example sharing a razor with an infected person). Less common routes include sexual transmission and vertical transmission (from mother to baby). Complications of chronic hepatitis C infection include cirrhosis, liver failure, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Testing for hepatitis C should be offered or considered if there are: Risk factors for hepatitis C

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

90. Hepatitis B: When should I test for hepatitis B?

Hepatitis B: When should I test for hepatitis B? When to test for hepatitis B | Diagnosis | Hepatitis B | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu When to test for hepatitis B Hepatitis B: When should I test for hepatitis B? Last revised in November 2019 When should I test for hepatitis B? Consider hepatitis B in the following groups: People who are asymptomatic who are infection. In particular screen opportunistically those who: Are more likely to have been exposed to hepatitis B (such as immigrants from (...) areas with a high prevalence, injecting drug users, and sex workers). Have been sexually assaulted. Have sustained a needlestick injury. Are HIV-positive. People with clinical features that could be indicative of hepatitis B: For acute infection, these include: A prodromal illness that includes fever, arthralgia, or a rash (that may appear about 2 weeks before the onset of jaundice, then resolves in acute hepatitis B). Non-specific malaise, fatigue, fever, nausea, and poor appetite. Right upper

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

91. Hepatitis C: Scenario: Active hepatitis C infection

Hepatitis C: Scenario: Active hepatitis C infection Scenario: Active hepatitis C infection | Management | Hepatitis C | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Scenario: Active hepatitis C infection Hepatitis C: Scenario: Active hepatitis C infection Last revised in April 2020 Scenario: Active hepatitis C infection From age 16 years onwards. How should I manage a person with hepatitis C in primary care? People with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection should be under the care of a hepatologist or specialist (...) gastroenterologist. If acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is suspected (hepatitis C antibody positive with of acute hepatitis and/or a likely recent is identified): Arrange a same-day assessment or seek immediate specialist advice. If chronic HCV infection is suspected (hepatitis C antibody positive and ribonucleic acid positive with no clinical features of acute hepatitis): Arrange an urgent referral. Confirm the person's address and telephone number at the time of referral, and use the practice's address

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

92. Hepatitis B: What issues should I consider before prescribing hepatitis B vaccine?

Hepatitis B: What issues should I consider before prescribing hepatitis B vaccine? Hepatitis B vaccine | Prescribing information | Hepatitis B | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Hepatitis B vaccine Hepatitis B: What issues should I consider before prescribing hepatitis B vaccine? Last revised in November 2019 What issues should I consider before prescribing hepatitis B vaccine? What types of hepatitis B vaccine are available? There are several hepatitis B vaccines licensed for use in the UK, all (...) of which are inactivated: Engerix B ® . Fendrix ® . HBvaxPRO ® . Two combined hepatitis A and B vaccines, Twinrix ® and Ambirix ® , are also available. [ ; ] What is the immunization schedule for the hepatitis B vaccine? Different hepatitis B vaccines, doses, and primary dosing schedules are recommended depending on the person's age and whether they are receiving haemodialysis. For further information, consult the . For most adult and childhood risk groups, an accelerated schedule should be used

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

93. Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Pregnant Women: Screening

Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Pregnant Women: Screening Recommendation | United States Preventive Services Taskforce Toggle navigation Main navigation Main navigation Recommendation Pregnant women The USPSTF recommends screening for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in pregnant women at their first prenatal visit A View the Clinical Summary in Population Pregnant Persons Recommendation Screen for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Grade: A Risk Assessment In the United States, new cases of HBV (...) test for detecting maternal HBV infection is the serologic identification of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Screening should be performed in each pregnancy, regardless of previous HBV vaccination or previous negative HBsAg test results Screening Intervals A test for HBsAg should be ordered at the first prenatal visit. Women with unknown HBsAg status or with new or continuing risk factors for HBV infection (eg, injection drug use or a sexually transmitted infection) should be screened

2019 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

94. AASLD?IDSA Recommendations for Testing, Managing, and Treating Hepatitis C Virus Infection

AASLD?IDSA Recommendations for Testing, Managing, and Treating Hepatitis C Virus Infection Hepatitis C Guidance 2019 Update: American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases–Infectious Diseases Society of America Recommendations for Testing, Managing, and Treating Hepatitis C Virus Infection - Ghany - 2020 - Hepatology - Wiley Online Library

2019 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases

95. Drugs for hepatitis C: it's time to slash prices!

Drugs for hepatitis C: it's time to slash prices! Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Drugs for hepatitis C: it's time to slash prices!'', 1 December 2018 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Drugs for hepatitis C: it's time to slash prices! Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight Drugs for hepatitis C: it's time to slash prices! The high prices (...) of hepatitis C drugs are an obstacle to treatment for most of the people around the world who are infected by the virus. When so-called direct-acting antiviral drugs against hepatitis C came onto the market around 2015, some stakeholders hailed them as a means of eradicating this disease. Sofosbuvir (Sovaldi°) was marketed in the United States at the exorbitant price of 1000 dollars per day, reflecting the company's strategy of seeking maximum profits in the richest countries and not eradication

2018 Prescrire

96. Chronic hepatitis B virus infection. (Abstract)

Chronic hepatitis B virus infection. Chronic hepatitis B virus infection is a global public health threat that causes considerable liver-related morbidity and mortality. It is acquired at birth or later via person-to-person transmission. Vaccination effectively prevents infection and chronic hepatitis B virus carriage. In chronically infected patients, an elevated serum hepatitis B virus DNA concentration is the main risk factor for disease progression, although there are other clinical (...) . With current vaccines, therapies, and an emphasis on improving linkage to care, WHO's goal of eliminating hepatitis B virus as a global health threat by 2030 is achievable.Copyright © 2018 World Health Organization. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

2018 Lancet

97. Sofosbuvir (hepatitis C in adolescents) - Benefit assessment according to §35a Social Code Book V

Sofosbuvir (hepatitis C in adolescents) - Benefit assessment according to §35a Social Code Book V Extract 1 Translation of Sections 2.1 to 2.5 of the dossier assessment Sofosbuvir (chronische Hepatitis C bei Jugendlichen) – Nutzenbewertung gemäß § 35a SGB V (Version 1.0; Status: 11 January 2018). Please note: This translation is provided as a service by IQWiG to English-language readers. However, solely the German original text is absolutely authoritative and legally binding. IQWiG Reports (...) – Commission No. A17-55 Sofosbuvir (chronic hepatitis C in adolescents) – Benefit assessment according to §35a Social Code Book V 1 Extract of dossier assessment A17-55 Version 1.0 Sofosbuvir (chronic hepatitis C in adolescents) 11 January 2018 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) - i - Publishing details Publisher: Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care Topic: Sofosbuvir (chronic hepatitis C in adolescents) – Benefit assessment according to §35a Social Code Book V

2018 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Healthcare (IQWiG)

98. Sofosbuvir/velpatasvir/voxilaprevir (chronic hepatitis C) - Addendum to Commission A17-35

Sofosbuvir/velpatasvir/voxilaprevir (chronic hepatitis C) - Addendum to Commission A17-35 1 Translation of addendum A18-05 Sofosbuvir/Velpatasvir/Voxilaprevir (Chronische Hepatitis C) – Addendum zum Auftrag A17-35 (Version 1.0; Status: 25 January 2018). Please note: This translation is provided as a service by IQWiG to English-language readers. However, solely the German original text is absolutely authoritative and legally binding. Addendum 25 January 2018 1.0 Commission: A18-05 Version (...) : Status: IQWiG Reports – Commission No. A18-05 Sofosbuvir/velpatasvir/ voxilaprevir (chronic hepatitis C) – Addendum to Commission A17-35 1 Addendum A18-05 Version 1.0 Sofosbuvir/velpatasvir/voxilaprevir – Addendum to Commission A17-35 25 January 2018 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care (IQWiG) - i - Publishing details Publisher: Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Health Care Topic: Sofosbuvir/velpatasvir/voxilaprevir (chronic hepatitis C) – Addendum to Commission A17-35

2018 Institute for Quality and Efficiency in Healthcare (IQWiG)

99. Treatment of Adolescents With Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection: New Regimen on the Block Full Text available with Trip Pro

Treatment of Adolescents With Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Infection: New Regimen on the Block Editorial to Leung et al. "Ombitasvir/Paritaprevir/Ritonavir With or Without Dasabuvir and With or Without Ribavirin for Adolescents With HCV Genotype 1 or 4".

2018 Hepatology communications

100. Hepatic Encephalopathy in Patients in Lviv (Ukraine) Full Text available with Trip Pro

Hepatic Encephalopathy in Patients in Lviv (Ukraine) Hepatic encephalopathy (HE) research has long been impeded by the vague definition of this disabling complication of liver failure. This article provides an overview of the etiology and impact of HE on neuromuscular functions as well as its role in the development of infections and anemia.This was a descriptive study conducted in 36 patients with HE. Close monitoring of these patients was done by checking on several parameters.The etiological (...) distribution: alcohol (67%), hepatitis C virus (HCV; 17%), HCV and alcohol (8%), hepatitis B virus (HBV; 3%), HBV and alcohol (3%), HBV and HCV (6%), and cryptogenic (3%). The laboratory results indicated an elevation of De Ritis level in 69% of cases and in 92% of total bilirubin values. The Halstead-Reitan (H-R) test score with regards to gender indicated that more than half of the patients had a score of 2, while only few cases received the scores 3 and 4. The frequency of H-R score with regards

2018 Journal of translational internal medicine