Latest & greatest articles for ibuprofen

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Top results for ibuprofen

1. Effect of Nonintervention vs Oral Ibuprofen in Patent Ductus Arteriosus in Preterm Infants: A Randomized Clinical Trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of Nonintervention vs Oral Ibuprofen in Patent Ductus Arteriosus in Preterm Infants: A Randomized Clinical Trial Effect of Nonintervention vs Oral Ibuprofen in Patent Ductus Arteriosus in Preterm Infants: A Randomized Clinical Trial - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Clipboard, Search History, and several other advanced features are temporarily unavailable. National Institutes of Health National (...) of items displayed: Create RSS Cancel RSS Link Copy Actions Cite Share Permalink Copy Page navigation JAMA Pediatr Actions . 2020 Jun 15;e201447. doi: 10.1001/jamapediatrics.2020.1447. Online ahead of print. Effect of Nonintervention vs Oral Ibuprofen in Patent Ductus Arteriosus in Preterm Infants: A Randomized Clinical Trial , , , , Affiliations Expand Affiliations 1 Samsung Medical Center, Department of Pediatrics, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea. 2 Statistics and Data Center

2020 EvidenceUpdates

2. Oral Paracetamol vs Oral Ibuprofen in Patent Ductus Arteriosus: A Randomized, Controlled, Noninferiority Trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Oral Paracetamol vs Oral Ibuprofen in Patent Ductus Arteriosus: A Randomized, Controlled, Noninferiority Trial Oral Paracetamol vs Oral Ibuprofen in Patent Ductus Arteriosus: A Randomized, Controlled, Noninferiority Trial - PubMed This site needs JavaScript to work properly. Please enable it to take advantage of the complete set of features! Clipboard, Search History, and several other advanced features are temporarily unavailable. National Institutes of Health National Library of Medicine (...) RSS Cancel RSS Link Copy Actions Cite Share Permalink Copy Page navigation J Pediatr Actions . 2020 Jul;222:79-84.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2020.01.058. Epub 2020 Apr 24. Oral Paracetamol vs Oral Ibuprofen in Patent Ductus Arteriosus: A Randomized, Controlled, Noninferiority Trial , , , , , , , , , , Affiliations Expand Affiliations 1 Division of Neonatology, Department of Pediatrics, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India; Department of Pediatrics, Research

2020 EvidenceUpdates

3. Should Ibuprofen be Used for COVID-19?

Should Ibuprofen be Used for COVID-19? MOH-ACE COVID-19 RAPID REVIEW Updated 3 June 2020. First published 21 March 2020. Page 1 of 3 Clinical evidence Background Should ibuprofen be used for COVID-19? This write-up summarises a rapid evidence review of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), particularly ibuprofen, to manage symptoms of COVID-19. The information may be revised as new evidence emerges. A news article titled “COVID-19: ibuprofen should not be used for managing symptoms (...) , say doctors and scientists” was published in BMJ on 17 March 2020. 1 It claims that anti-inflammatory drugs (e.g. ibuprofen and cortisone) could exacerbate symptoms of COVID-19 infection, and paracetamol should be used instead; however different views were expressed. No clinical trials were identified assessing the safety of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in managing symptoms of COVID-19. However, there are some studies on the potential mechanisms of inflammatory responses available

2020 Appropriate Care Guides, Agency for Care Effectiveness (Singapore)

4. Ibuprofen for the treatment of patent ductus arteriosus in preterm or low birth weight (or both) infants. (Abstract)

Ibuprofen for the treatment of patent ductus arteriosus in preterm or low birth weight (or both) infants. Indomethacin is used as standard therapy to close a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) but is associated with reduced blood flow to several organs. Ibuprofen, another cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, may be as effective as indomethacin with fewer adverse effects.To determine the effectiveness and safety of ibuprofen compared with indomethacin, other cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor(s), placebo (...) controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials.Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of ibuprofen for the treatment of a PDA in preterm, low birth weight, or both preterm and low-birth-weight newborn infants.Data collection and analysis conformed to the methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group. We used the GRADE approach to assess the quality of evidence.We included 39 studies enrolling 2843 infants. Ibuprofen (IV) versus placebo: IV Ibuprofen (3 doses) reduced the failure to close a PDA

2020 Cochrane

5. Ibuprofen Plus Acetaminophen Versus Ibuprofen Alone for Acute Low Back Pain: An Emergency Department-based Randomized Study (Abstract)

Ibuprofen Plus Acetaminophen Versus Ibuprofen Alone for Acute Low Back Pain: An Emergency Department-based Randomized Study Patients with low back pain (LBP) are often treated with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). NSAIDs are modestly effective for LBP, but many patients with LBP continue to suffer despite treatment with these medications. We compared pain and functional outcomes 1 week after emergency department (ED) discharge among patients randomized to a 1-week course (...) of ibuprofen plus acetaminophen versus ibuprofen plus placebo.This was a randomized, double-blind study conducted in two urban EDs. Patients presenting with acute, nontraumatic, nonradicular LBP of no more than 2 weeks' duration were eligible for enrollment immediately prior to discharge from an ED if they had a score > 5 on the Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ), a 24-item validated instrument, indicating more than minimal functional impairment. All patients were given a standardized 10-minute

2020 EvidenceUpdates

6. Ibuprofen for the prevention of patent ductus arteriosus in preterm and/or low birth weight infants. (Abstract)

Ibuprofen for the prevention of patent ductus arteriosus in preterm and/or low birth weight infants. Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) complicates the clinical course of preterm infants and increases the risk of adverse outcomes. Indomethacin has been the standard treatment to close a PDA but is associated with renal, gastrointestinal, and cerebral side effects. Ibuprofen has less effect on blood flow velocity to important organs.Primary objectives To determine the effectiveness and safety (...) of ibuprofen compared to placebo/no intervention, or other cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor drugs in the prevention of PDA in preterm infants.We used the standard search strategy of Cochrane Neonatal to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2018, Issue 10), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 17 October 2018), Embase (1980 to 17 October 2018), and CINAHL; 1982 to 17 October 2018). We searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles

2020 Cochrane

7. Should Ibuprofen be Used for COVID-19?

Should Ibuprofen be Used for COVID-19? MOH-ACE COVID-19 RAPID REVIEW 21 March 2020 Page 1 of 2 Clinical evidence Recommendations from professional bodies Background Should ibuprofen be used for COVID-19? This write-up summarises a rapid evidence review of NSAIDs, particularly ibuprofen, to manage symptoms of patients with COVID-19. The information may be revised as new evidence emerges. A news article titled “COVID-19: ibuprofen should not be used for managing symptoms, say doctors (...) and scientists” was published in BMJ on 17 Mar 2020. 1 It claims that anti-inflammatory drugs (eg. ibuprofen, cortisone) could aggravate infection in patients with suspected COVID-19 and paracetamol should be used in these patients; however different views were expressed. No clinical trials were identified assessing the safety of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in managing symptoms of COVID-19. Instead, there are studies on the potential mechanisms of inflammatory responses and some proposes

2020 Appropriate Care Guides, Agency for Care Effectiveness (Singapore)

8. A randomized, placebo- and active-controlled, multi-country, multi-center parallel group trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a fixed-dose combination of 400 mg ibuprofen and 100 mg caffeine compared with ibuprofen 400 mg and placebo in patients w Full Text available with Trip Pro

A randomized, placebo- and active-controlled, multi-country, multi-center parallel group trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a fixed-dose combination of 400 mg ibuprofen and 100 mg caffeine compared with ibuprofen 400 mg and placebo in patients w Ibuprofen is a well-established analgesic for acute pain symptoms. In several acute pain models, caffeine has demonstrated an analgesic adjuvant effect. This randomized trial (NCT03003000) was designed to compare the efficacy of a fixed-dose (...) combination of ibuprofen and caffeine with ibuprofen or placebo for the treatment of acute lower back/neck pain.Patients with acute lower back/neck pain resulting in pain on movement (POM) ≥5 on a 10-point numerical rating scale were randomized 2:2:1 to receive orally, three times daily for 6 days, 400 mg ibuprofen+100 mg caffeine, 400 mg ibuprofen or placebo, respectively. The primary endpoint was change in POMWP (POM triggering highest pain score at baseline [worst procedure]) between baseline

2019 EvidenceUpdates

9. Comparison of Oral Ibuprofen at Three Single-Dose Regimens for Treating Acute Pain in the Emergency Department: A Randomized Controlled Trial (Abstract)

Comparison of Oral Ibuprofen at Three Single-Dose Regimens for Treating Acute Pain in the Emergency Department: A Randomized Controlled Trial Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used extensively for the management of acute pain, with ibuprofen being one of the most frequently used oral analgesics in the emergency department (ED). We compare the analgesic efficacy of oral ibuprofen at 3 different doses for adult ED patients with acute pain.This was a randomized, double-blind trial (...) comparing analgesic efficacy of 3 doses of oral ibuprofen (400, 600, and 800 mg) in adult ED patients with acute painful conditions. Primary outcome included difference in pain scores between the 3 groups at 60 minutes.We enrolled 225 subjects (75 per group). The difference in mean pain scores at 60 minutes between the 400- and 600-mg groups was -0.14 (95% confidence interval [CI] -0.67 to 0.39); between the 400- and 800-mg groups, 0.14 (95% CI -0.65 to 0.37); and between the 600- and 800-mg groups

2019 EvidenceUpdates

10. Ibuprofen for the prevention of patent ductus arteriosus in preterm and/or low birth weight infants. (Abstract)

Ibuprofen for the prevention of patent ductus arteriosus in preterm and/or low birth weight infants. Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) complicates the clinical course of preterm infants and increases the risk of adverse outcomes. Indomethacin has been the standard treatment to close a PDA but is associated with renal, gastrointestinal, and cerebral side effects. Ibuprofen has less effect on blood flow velocity to important organs.Primary objectivesTo determine the effectiveness and safety (...) of ibuprofen compared to placebo/no intervention, or other cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor drugs in the prevention of PDA in preterm infants.We used the standard search strategy of Cochrane Neonatal to search the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2018, Issue 10), MEDLINE via PubMed (1966 to 17 October 2018), Embase (1980 to 17 October 2018), and CINAHL; 1982 to 17 October 2018). We searched clinical trials databases, conference proceedings, and the reference lists of retrieved articles

2019 Cochrane

11. An integrated safety analysis of combined acetaminophen and ibuprofen (Maxigesic ((R)) /Combogesic((R))) in adults Full Text available with Trip Pro

An integrated safety analysis of combined acetaminophen and ibuprofen (Maxigesic ((R)) /Combogesic((R))) in adults Acetaminophen (APAP) and ibuprofen (IBP) are two analgesic compounds with a long history of use. Both are considered safe at recommended over-the-counter daily doses. Chronic use, high doses, or concomitant medication can produce safety risks for both drugs. APAP is associated with increased risk of hepatic injury, while IBP can produce gastric bleeding and thromboembolic events

2019 EvidenceUpdates

12. Effect of Combination of Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) and Ibuprofen vs Either Alone on Patient-Controlled Morphine Consumption in the First 24 Hours After Total Hip Arthroplasty: The PANSAID Randomized Clinical Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of Combination of Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) and Ibuprofen vs Either Alone on Patient-Controlled Morphine Consumption in the First 24 Hours After Total Hip Arthroplasty: The PANSAID Randomized Clinical Trial. Multimodal postoperative analgesia is widely used but lacks evidence of benefit.Investigate beneficial and harmful effects of 4 nonopioid analgesics regimens.Randomized, blinded, placebo-controlled, 4-group trial in 6 Danish hospitals with 90-day follow-up that included 556 (...) patients undergoing total hip arthroplasty (THA) from December 2015 to October 2017. Final date of follow-up was January 1, 2018.Participants were randomized to receive paracetamol (acetaminophen) 1000 mg plus ibuprofen 400 mg (n = 136; PCM + IBU), paracetamol 1000 mg plus matched placebo (n = 142; PCM), ibuprofen 400 mg plus matched placebo (n = 141; IBU), or half-strength paracetamol 500 mg plus ibuprofen 200 mg (n = 140; HS-PCM + IBU) orally every 6 hours for 24 hours postoperatively, starting 1

2019 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

13. Altitude Sickness Prevention with Ibuprofen Relative to Acetazolamide (Abstract)

Altitude Sickness Prevention with Ibuprofen Relative to Acetazolamide Acute mountain sickness is a common occurrence for travel to high altitudes. Although previous studies of ibuprofen have shown efficacy for the prevention of acute mountain sickness, recommendations have been limited, as ibuprofen has not been compared directly with acetazolamide until this study.Before their ascent to 3810 m on White Mountain in California, adult volunteers were randomized to ibuprofen (600 mg, 3 times daily (...) , started 4 hours before the ascent), or to acetazolamide (125 mg, twice daily, started the night before the ascent). The main outcome measure was acute mountain sickness incidence, using the Lake Louise Questionnaire (LLQ), with a score of >3 with headache. Sleep quality and headache severity were measured with the Groningen Sleep Quality Survey (GSQS). This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT03154645 RESULTS: Ninety-two participants completed the study: 45 (49%) on ibuprofen and 47 (51

2019 EvidenceUpdates

14. Common cold: Ibuprofen

Common cold: Ibuprofen Ibuprofen | Prescribing information | Common cold | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Ibuprofen Common cold: Ibuprofen Last revised in August 2016 Ibuprofen For detailed prescribing information on ibuprofen, see the CKS topic on . © .

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

15. Bites - human and animal: What should I consider before prescribing paracetamol or ibuprofen?

Bites - human and animal: What should I consider before prescribing paracetamol or ibuprofen? Paracetamol and ibuprofen | Prescribing information | Bites - human and animal | CKS | NICE Search CKS… Menu Paracetamol and ibuprofen Bites - human and animal: What should I consider before prescribing paracetamol or ibuprofen? Last revised in October 2018 What should I consider before prescribing paracetamol or ibuprofen? For more information on prescribing paracetamol and ibuprofen, see the CKS

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

16. Ibuprofen

Ibuprofen Top results for ibuprofen - Trip Database or use your Google+ account Liberating the literature ALL of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document ANY of these words: Title only Anywhere in the document This EXACT phrase: Title only Anywhere in the document EXCLUDING words: Title only Anywhere in the document Timeframe: to: Combine searches by placing the search numbers in the top search box and pressing the search button. An example search might look like (#1 or #2) and (#3 (...) or #4) Loading history... Population: Intervention: Comparison: Outcome: Population: Intervention: Latest & greatest articles for ibuprofen The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence

2018 Trip Latest and Greatest

17. Ibuprofen versus pivmecillinam for uncomplicated urinary tract infection in women-A double-blind, randomized non-inferiority trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Ibuprofen versus pivmecillinam for uncomplicated urinary tract infection in women-A double-blind, randomized non-inferiority trial Although uncomplicated urinary tract infections (UTIs) are often self-limiting, most patients will be prescribed antibiotic treatment. We assessed whether treatment with ibuprofen was non-inferior to pivmecillinam in achieving symptomatic resolution by day 4, with a non-inferiority margin of 10%.This was a randomized, controlled, double-blind non-inferiority trial (...) . We recruited patients from 16 sites in a general practice setting in Norway, Sweden, and Denmark. Non-pregnant women aged 18-60 years presenting with symptoms of uncomplicated UTI were screened for eligibility from 11 April 2013 to 22 April 2016. Patients with informed consent were randomized (1:1 ratio) to treatment with either 600 mg ibuprofen or 200 mg pivmecillinam 3 times a day for 3 days. The patient, treating physician, and study personnel were blinded to treatment allocation. The primary

2018 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

18. Effect of ibuprofen vs acetaminophen on postpartum hypertension in preeclampsia with severe features: a double-masked, randomized controlled trial (Abstract)

Effect of ibuprofen vs acetaminophen on postpartum hypertension in preeclampsia with severe features: a double-masked, randomized controlled trial Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug use has been shown to increase blood pressure in nonpregnant adults. Because of this, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists suggests avoiding their use in women with postpartum hypertension; however, evidence to support this recommendation is lacking.Our goal was to test the hypothesis (...) that nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, such as ibuprofen, adversely affect postpartum blood pressure control in women with preeclampsia with severe features.At delivery, we randomized women with preeclampsia with severe features to receive around-the-clock oral dosing with either 600 mg of ibuprofen or 650 mg of acetaminophen every 6 hours. Dosing began within 6 hours after delivery and continued until discharge, with opioid analgesics available as needed for breakthrough pain. Study drugs were encapsulated

2018 EvidenceUpdates

19. Ibuprofen Abuse—A Case of Rhabdomyolysis, Hypokalemia, and Hypophosphatemia With Drug-Induced Mixed Renal Tubular Acidosis Full Text available with Trip Pro

Ibuprofen Abuse—A Case of Rhabdomyolysis, Hypokalemia, and Hypophosphatemia With Drug-Induced Mixed Renal Tubular Acidosis 30197993 2019 02 26 2468-0249 3 5 2018 Sep Kidney international reports Kidney Int Rep Ibuprofen Abuse-A Case of Rhabdomyolysis, Hypokalemia, and Hypophosphatemia With Drug-Induced Mixed Renal Tubular Acidosis. 1237-1238 10.1016/j.ekir.2018.05.014 Patil Shakuntala S Department of Nephrology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, USA

2018 Kidney international reports

20. Child health: Combining morphine and ibuprofen does not improve pain control compared with using either drug alone following musculoskeletal injury in children

Child health: Combining morphine and ibuprofen does not improve pain control compared with using either drug alone following musculoskeletal injury in children Combining morphine and ibuprofen does not improve pain control compared with using either drug alone following musculoskeletal injury in children | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more (...) about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Combining morphine and ibuprofen does not improve pain control compared with using either

2018 Evidence-Based Nursing