Latest & greatest articles for low back pain

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This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on low back pain and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Top results for low back pain

301. Isolated lumbar extensor strengthening versus regular physical therapy in an army working population with nonacute low back pain: a randomized controlled trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Isolated lumbar extensor strengthening versus regular physical therapy in an army working population with nonacute low back pain: a randomized controlled trial To evaluate the effectiveness of specific lumbar extensor training compared with regular physical therapy (PT) in workers with nonspecific nonacute low back pain (LBP).A multicenter randomized controlled trial with 1-year follow-up.PT department in (military primary care) health centers.Predominantly male soldiers (N=129) with 4 weeks (...) or more of low back complaints who were referred by the health center's general practitioner for PT (mean age, 35.9+/-10.8 y; range, 20-56 y), of whom 127 randomized participants were included in the analyses. One patient withdrew because of adverse effects during treatment.Participants were assigned to 1 of 2 treatment programs: (1) a 10-week device-supported isolated lumbar extension training, twice a week, or (2) regular PT, mainly consisting of exercise therapy and aerobic activities.Functional

2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

302. A randomized placebo-controlled trial of single-dose im corticosteroid for radicular low back pain Full Text available with Trip Pro

A randomized placebo-controlled trial of single-dose im corticosteroid for radicular low back pain A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of patients with radicular low back pain who present to an emergency department (ED) within 1 week of pain onset.We hypothesized that a single intramuscular 160 mg dose of methylprednisolone acetate would improve pain and functional outcomes 1 month after ED discharge if the corticosteroid were administered early in disease (...) symptomotology.Parenteral corticosteroids are not recommended for acute, radicular low back pain, though their role in this disease process is ill-defined. To date, this medication class has only been studied in a highly selected group of patients requiring hospitalization. METHODS.: Adults between the ages of 21 and 50 who presented to an ED with low back pain and a positive straight leg raise test were enrolled. The primary outcome was change in pain intensity on an 11 point numerical rating scale 1 month after ED

2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

303. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for low back pain: an updated cochrane review (Abstract)

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs for low back pain: an updated cochrane review A systematic review of randomized controlled trials.To assess the effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and COX-2 inhibitors in the treatment of nonspecific low back pain and to assess which type of NSAID is most effective.NSAIDs are the most frequently prescribed medications worldwide and are widely used for patients with low back pain. Selective COX-2 inhibitors are currently available (...) and used for patients with low back pain.We searched the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials up to and including June 2007 if reported in English, Dutch, or German. We also screened references given in relevant reviews and identified trials. Randomized trials and double-blind controlled trials of NSAIDs in nonspecific low back pain with or without sciatica were included.In total, 65 trials (total number of patients = 11,237) were included in this review

2008 EvidenceUpdates

304. Muscle activation changes after exercise rehabilitation for chronic low back pain (Abstract)

Muscle activation changes after exercise rehabilitation for chronic low back pain To investigate the changes in 2 electromyographic measures, flexion relaxation (FR) response and feed-forward activation of the deep abdominals, associated with low back pain (LBP) after different rehabilitation interventions.A 2x2 factorial design with subjects' self-selecting treatment with randomization after 4 weeks to either the specific exercise group or exercise advice group for a further 12-week (...) or treatment effects were identified.Supervised exercise rehabilitation leads to more rapid improvements in self-rated disability, which were associated with greater improvement in the low back FR response.

2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

305. Management of acute low back pain.

Management of acute low back pain. Guidelines and Measures | Agency for Healthcare Research & Quality HHS.gov Search ahrq.gov Search ahrq.gov Menu Topics A - Z Healthcare Delivery Latest available findings on quality of and access to health care Searchable database of AHRQ Grants, Working Papers & HHS Recovery Act Projects AHRQ Projects funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Trust Fund You are here Guidelines and Measures Funding for the National Guideline Clearinghouse (NGC) has

2008 Michigan Quality Improvement Consortium

306. Prognosis in patients with recent onset low back pain in Australian primary care: inception cohort study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Prognosis in patients with recent onset low back pain in Australian primary care: inception cohort study. To estimate the one year prognosis and identify prognostic factors in cases of recent onset low back pain managed in primary care.Cohort study with one year follow-up.Primary care clinics in Sydney, Australia.An inception cohort of 973 consecutive primary care patients (mean age 43.3, 54.8% men) with non-specific low back pain of less than two weeks' duration recruited from the clinics (...) at baseline had returned to previous work status within 14 days (95% confidence interval 11 to 17 days) and 83% had returned to previous work status by three months. Disability (median recovery time 31 days, 25 to 37 days) and pain (median 58 days, 52 to 63 days) took much longer to resolve. Only 72% of participants had completely recovered 12 months after the baseline consultation. Older age, compensation cases, higher pain intensity, longer duration of low back pain before consultation, more days

2008 BMJ

307. A 50-year-old man with chronic low back pain. Full Text available with Trip Pro

A 50-year-old man with chronic low back pain. Mr S, a 50-year-old man, has long-standing low back pain. His pain began more than 20 years earlier with a lumbar disk herniation and has persisted despite diskectomy. He has undergone numerous treatments, but he remains disabled with ongoing pain. His treatment course is used to frame the epidemiology and pathophysiology underlying acute and chronic lumbosacral and radicular pain. The roles of neuropathic pain medications, chronic opioid therapy (...) , physical therapy, spinal manipulation, and multidisciplinary pain treatment programs are reviewed. The indications for and outcomes associated with interventional pain treatments, including epidural steroid injection, facet blocks and radiofrequency treatment for facet-related pain, intradiskal electrothermal therapy, spinal cord stimulation, and intrathecal drug delivery, are discussed. Clinicians are given an evidence-based approach to using available treatment options for low back pain.

2008 JAMA

308. Lumbar supports for prevention and treatment of low back pain. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Lumbar supports for prevention and treatment of low back pain. Lumbar supports are used in the treatment of low-back pain patients, to prevent the onset of low-back pain (primary prevention) or to prevent recurrences of a low-back pain episode (secondary prevention).To assess the effects of lumbar supports for prevention and treatment of non-specific low-back pain.We updated the search in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PubMed, EMBASE, and CINAHL to December 2006. We also (...) of the studies was rather low. Only five of the fifteen studies met 50% or more of the internal validity items. There was moderate evidence that lumbar supports are not more effective than no intervention or training in preventing low-back pain, and conflicting evidence whether lumbar supports are effective supplements to other preventive interventions. It is still unclear if lumbar supports are more effective than no or other interventions for the treatment of low-back pain.There is moderate evidence

2008 Cochrane

309. The basis for recommending repeating epidural steroid injections for radicular low back pain: a literature review (Abstract)

The basis for recommending repeating epidural steroid injections for radicular low back pain: a literature review To determine the current evidence to support guidelines for frequency and timing of epidural steroid injections (ESIs), to help determine what sort of response should occur to repeat an injection, and to outline specific research needs in these areas.A PubMed, Medline (EBSCO), and Cochrane library search (January 1971-December 2005), as well as additional references found from (...) the initial search.There were no studies that specifically addressed the objectives outlined. Eleven randomized controlled trials, 1 prospective controlled trial, and 2 prospective cohort studies were identified that included a protocol involving repeat epidural injections for radicular pain secondary to herniated nucleus pulposus or spinal stenosis. One qualitative survey was also identified. Five review articles were also included that discussed this topic.Data were extracted from clinical trials

2008 EvidenceUpdates

310. A prognostic approach to defining chronic pain: replication in a UK primary care low back pain population (Abstract)

A prognostic approach to defining chronic pain: replication in a UK primary care low back pain population A novel prognostic approach to defining chronic pain was developed in a US primary care low back pain population, using a combination of information about pain history, current status and likely prognosis. We tested whether this method was generalizable to a UK population. A prospective cohort of 426 patients who consulted with back pain at one of five UK general practices, and who returned (...) of future clinically significant back pain, respectively) were appropriate for the UK population, but the cut-point for classifying people at low risk (20% probability) was not replicated in the UK sample. The newly derived cut-points in the UK sample were similar; they remained the same for probable chronic pain, were slightly increased for possible chronic pain, and slightly reduced for those at intermediate or low risk. This method for defining chronic pain prospectively, using risk thresholds

2008 EvidenceUpdates

311. Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with traction therapy (Abstract)

Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with traction therapy The management of chronic low back pain (CLBP) has proven to be very challenging in North America, as evidenced by its mounting socioeconomic burden. Choosing among available nonsurgical therapies can be overwhelming for many stakeholders, including patients, health providers, policy makers, and third-party payers. Although all parties share a common goal and wish to use limited health-care resources to support (...) interventions most likely to result in clinically meaningful improvements, there is often uncertainty about the most appropriate intervention for a particular patient. To help understand and evaluate the various commonly used nonsurgical approaches to CLBP, the North American Spine Society has sponsored this special focus issue of The Spine Journal, titled Evidence-Informed Management of Chronic Low Back Pain Without Surgery. Articles in this special focus issue were contributed by leading spine

2008 EvidenceUpdates

312. Mindfulness meditation for the treatment of chronic low back pain in older adults: a randomized controlled pilot study Full Text available with Trip Pro

Mindfulness meditation for the treatment of chronic low back pain in older adults: a randomized controlled pilot study The objectives of this pilot study were to assess the feasibility of recruitment and adherence to an eight-session mindfulness meditation program for community-dwelling older adults with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and to develop initial estimates of treatment effects. It was designed as a randomized, controlled clinical trial. Participants were 37 community-dwelling older (...) adults aged 65 years and older with CLBP of moderate intensity occurring daily or almost every day. Participants were randomized to an 8-week mindfulness-based meditation program or to a wait-list control group. Baseline, 8-week and 3-month follow-up measures of pain, physical function, and quality of life were assessed. Eighty-nine older adults were screened and 37 found to be eligible and randomized within a 6-month period. The mean age of the sample was 74.9 years, 21/37 (57%) of participants were

2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

313. Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with needle acupuncture. (Abstract)

Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with needle acupuncture. The management of chronic low back pain (CLBP) has proven to be very challenging in North America, as evidenced by its mounting socioeconomic burden. Choosing among available nonsurgical therapies can be overwhelming for many stakeholders, including patients, health providers, policy makers, and third-party payers. Although all parties share a common goal and wish to use limited health-care resources to support (...) interventions most likely to result in clinically meaningful improvements, there is often uncertainty about the most appropriate intervention for a particular patient. To help understand and evaluate the various commonly used nonsurgical approaches to CLBP, the North American Spine Society has sponsored this special focus issue to The Spine Journal, titled Evidence-Informed Management of Chronic Low Back Pain Without Surgery. Articles in this special focus issue were contributed by leading spine

2008 EvidenceUpdates

314. Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with herbal, vitamin, mineral, and homeopathic supplements. (Abstract)

Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with herbal, vitamin, mineral, and homeopathic supplements. The management of chronic low back pain (CLBP) has proven very challenging in North America, as evidenced by its mounting socioeconomic burden. Choosing amongst available nonsurgical therapies can be overwhelming for many stakeholders, including patients, health providers, policy makers, and third-party payers. Although all parties share a common goal and wish to use limited health (...) -care resources to support interventions most likely to result in clinically meaningful improvements, there is often uncertainty about the most appropriate intervention for a particular patient. To help understand and evaluate the various commonly used nonsurgical approaches to CLBP, the North American Spine Society has sponsored this special focus issue of The Spine Journal, titled Evidence-Informed Management of Chronic Low Back Pain Without Surgery. Articles in this special focus issue were

2008 EvidenceUpdates

315. Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with physical activity, smoking cessation, and weight loss. (Abstract)

Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with physical activity, smoking cessation, and weight loss. The management of chronic low back pain (CLBP) has proven to be very challenging in North America, as evidenced by its mounting socioeconomic burden. Choosing among available nonsurgical therapies can be overwhelming for many stakeholders, including patients, health providers, policy makers, and third-party payers. Although all parties share a common goal and wish to use limited (...) health-care resources to support interventions most likely to result in clinically meaningful improvements, there is often uncertainty about the most appropriate intervention for a particular patient. To help understand and evaluate the various commonly used nonsurgical approaches to CLBP, the North American Spine Society has sponsored this special focus issue of The Spine Journal, titled Evidence-Informed Management of Chronic Low Back Pain Without Surgery. Articles in this special focus issue were

2008 EvidenceUpdates

316. Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with massage. (Abstract)

Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with massage. The management of chronic low back pain (CLBP) has proven to be very challenging in North America, as evidenced by its mounting socioeconomic burden. Choosing amongst available nonsurgical therapies can be overwhelming for many stakeholders, including patients, health providers, policy makers, and third-party payers. Although all parties share a common goal and wish to use limited health-care resources to support interventions (...) most likely to result in clinically meaningful improvements, there is often uncertainty about the most appropriate intervention for a particular patient. To help understand and evaluate the various commonly used nonsurgical approaches to CLBP, the North American Spine Society has sponsored this special focus issue of The Spine Journal, titled Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain without surgery. Articles in this special focus issue were contributed by leading spine practitioners

2008 EvidenceUpdates

317. Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with lumbar extensor strengthening exercises. (Abstract)

Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with lumbar extensor strengthening exercises. The management of chronic low back pain (CLBP) has proven very challenging in North America, as evidenced by its mounting socioeconomic burden. Choosing among available nonsurgical therapies can be overwhelming for many stakeholders, including patients, health providers, policy makers, and third-party payers. Although all parties share a common goal and wish to use limited health-care resources (...) to support interventions most likely to result in clinically meaningful improvements, there is often uncertainty about the most appropriate intervention for a particular patient. To help understand and evaluate the various commonly used nonsurgical approaches to CLBP, the North American Spine Society has sponsored this special focus issue of to The Spine Journal, titled Evidence-Informed Management of Chronic Low Back Pain Without Surgery. Articles in this supplement were contributed by leading spine

2008 EvidenceUpdates

318. Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with lumbar stabilization exercises. (Abstract)

Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with lumbar stabilization exercises. The management of chronic low back pain (CLBP) has proven very challenging in North America, as evidenced by its mounting socioeconomic burden. Choosing among available nonsurgical therapies can be overwhelming for many stakeholders, including patients, health providers, policy makers, and third-party payers. Although all parties share a common goal and wish to use limited health-care resources to support (...) interventions most likely to result in clinically meaningful improvements, there is often uncertainty about the most appropriate intervention for a particular patient. To help understand and evaluate the various commonly used nonsurgical approaches to CLBP, the North American Spine Society has sponsored this special focus issue of The Spine Journal, titled Evidence-Informed Management of Chronic Low Back Pain Without Surgery. Articles in this special focus issue were contributed by leading spine

2008 EvidenceUpdates

319. Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, interferential current, electrical muscle stimulation, ultrasound, and thermotherapy. (Abstract)

Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, interferential current, electrical muscle stimulation, ultrasound, and thermotherapy. The management of chronic low back pain (CLBP) has proven to be very challenging in North America, as evidenced by its mounting socioeconomic burden. Choosing among available nonsurgical therapies can be overwhelming for many stakeholders, including patients, health providers, policy makers, and third-party (...) Low Back Pain Without Surgery. Articles in this special focus issue were contributed by leading spine practitioners and researchers, who were invited to summarize the best available evidence for a particular intervention and encouraged to make this information accessible to nonexperts. Each of the articles contains five sections (description, theory, evidence of efficacy, harms, and summary) with common subheadings to facilitate comparison across the 24 different interventions profiled

2008 EvidenceUpdates

320. Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with spinal manipulation and mobilization. (Abstract)

Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with spinal manipulation and mobilization. The management of chronic low back pain (CLBP) has proven very challenging in North America, as evidenced by its mounting socioeconomic burden. Choosing among available nonsurgical therapies can be overwhelming for many stakeholders, including patients, health providers, policy makers, and third-party payers. Although all parties share a common goal and wish to use limited health-care resources (...) to support interventions most likely to result in clinically meaningful improvements, there is often uncertainty about the most appropriate intervention for a particular patient. To help understand and evaluate the various commonly used nonsurgical approaches to CLBP, the North American Spine Society has sponsored this special focus issue of The Spine Journal, titled Evidence Informed Management of Chronic Low Back Pain Without Surgery. Articles in this special focus issue were contributed by leading

2008 EvidenceUpdates