Latest & greatest articles for low back pain

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Top results for low back pain

321. Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with prolotherapy. (Abstract)

Evidence-informed management of chronic low back pain with prolotherapy. The management of chronic low back pain (CLBP) has proven to be very challenging in North America, as evidenced by its mounting socioeconomic burden. Choosing among available nonsurgical therapies can be overwhelming for many stakeholders, including patients, health providers, policy makers, and third-party payers. Although all parties share a common goal and wish to use limited health-care resources to support (...) interventions most likely to result in clinically meaningful improvements, there is often uncertainty about the most appropriate intervention for a particular patient. To help understand and evaluate the various commonly used nonsurgical approaches to CLBP, the North American Spine Society has sponsored this special focus issue of The Spine Journal, titled Evidence-Informed Management of Chronic Low Back Pain Without Surgery. Articles in this special focus issue were contributed by leading spine

2008 EvidenceUpdates

322. Insufficient data on clinical effects of low level laser therapy for low-back pain

Insufficient data on clinical effects of low level laser therapy for low-back pain PEARLS Practical Evidence About Real Life Situations PEARLS are succinct summaries of Cochrane Systematic Reviews for primary care practitioners. They are funded by the New Zealand Guidelines Group. PEARLS provide guidance on whether a treatment is effective or ineffective. PEARLS are prepared as an educational resource and do not replace clinician judgement in the management of individual cases. View PEARLS (...) online at: www.cochraneprimarycare.org Insufficient data on clinical effects of low level laser therapy for low- back pain Clinical question Is low level laser therapy (LLLT) effective in patients with non- specific low-back pain? Bottom line LLLT, when compared to a sham treatment, may be beneficial for pain relief and reducing disability in patients with sub-acute or chronic non-specific low-back pain, although treatment effects are small. However, when LLLT is added to exercise and compared

2008 Publication 410

323. Individual patient education is effective for acute or subacute low-back pain

Individual patient education is effective for acute or subacute low-back pain PEARLS Practical Evidence About Real Life Situations PEARLS are succinct summaries of Cochrane Systematic Reviews for primary care practitioners. They are funded by the New Zealand Guidelines Group. PEARLS provide guidance on whether a treatment is effective or ineffective. PEARLS are prepared as an educational resource and do not replace clinician judgement in the management of individual cases. View PEARLS online (...) at: www.cochraneprimarycare.org Individual patient education is effective for acute or subacute low-back pain Clinical question How effective is individual patient education in the treatment of non-specific low-back pain? Bottom line People with low-back pain who received an individual patient education session, lasting at least 2 hours, in addition to their usual care had better outcomes than people who only received usual care. Shorter education sessions, or providing written information by itself without an individual

2008 Publication 410

324. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have a small short-term effect on low-back pain

Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have a small short-term effect on low-back pain PEARLS Practical Evidence About Real Life Situations PEARLS are succinct summaries of Cochrane Systematic Reviews for primary care practitioners. They are funded by the New Zealand Guidelines Group. PEARLS provide guidance on whether a treatment is effective or ineffective. PEARLS are prepared as an educational resource and do not replace clinician judgement in the management of individual cases. View PEARLS (...) online at: www.cochraneprimarycare.org Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have a small short-term effect on low-back pain Clinical question How effective are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in the treatment of non-specific low-back pain? Bottom line Compared with placebo, NSAIDs are effective for short- term symptomatic relief in patients with acute and chronic low-back pain without sciatica. However, the effect may be of marginal clinical significance. In patients with sciatica

2008 Publication 410

325. Unclear role for lumbar supports in low back pain

Unclear role for lumbar supports in low back pain PEARLS Practical Evidence About Real Life Situations PEARLS are succinct summaries of Cochrane Systematic Reviews for primary care practitioners. They Unclear role for lumbar supports in low back pain Clinical question How effective are lumbar supports for prevention and treatment of non-specific low back pain (LBP)? Bottom line There is moderate evidence that lumbar supports are no more effective in preventing LBP than no intervention (...) prevention) or to prevent recurrences of a LBP episode (secondary prevention). Cochrane Systematic Review van Duijvenbode ICD et al. Lumbar supports for prevention and treatment of low back pain. Cochrane Reviews 2008, Issue 2. Article No. CD001823. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001823. pub3. This review contains 7 preventive studies involving 14,437 participants and 8 treatment studies involving 1361 participants. PEARLS 117, October 2008, written by Brian R McAvoy [References] 1. Krismer M et al. Best Pract

2008 Publication 410

326. Adjunctive diclofenac and spinal manipulation did not speed recovery of acute low back pain

Adjunctive diclofenac and spinal manipulation did not speed recovery of acute low back pain Adjunctive diclofenac and spinal manipulation did not speed recovery of acute low back pain | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers (...) of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Adjunctive diclofenac and spinal manipulation did not speed recovery of acute low back pain Article Text Therapeutics Adjunctive diclofenac and spinal manipulation did not speed recovery of acute low back pain

2008 Evidence-Based Medicine

327. Review: non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and muscle relaxants are moderately effective for low back pain

Review: non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and muscle relaxants are moderately effective for low back pain Review: non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and muscle relaxants are moderately effective for low back painCommentary | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username (...) anti-inflammatory drugs and muscle relaxants are moderately effective for low back pain Commentary Statistics from Altmetric.com Request Permissions If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways. Copyright information: 2008 RCN Publishing Company Limited and BMJ Publishing Group Ltd Read

2008 Evidence-Based Nursing

328. A systematic review of paracetamol for non-specific low back pain

A systematic review of paracetamol for non-specific low back pain Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2008 DARE.

329. Stabilisation exercises for low back pain: a systematic review

Stabilisation exercises for low back pain: a systematic review Stabilisation exercises for low back pain: a systematic review Stabilisation exercises for low back pain: a systematic review May S, Johnson R CRD summary The authors concluded there might be a role for specific stabilisation exercises for some patients with chronic low back pain, but they were no more effective than other active interventions. The authors' cautious conclusion reflects the evidence presented and is likely (...) to be reliable, but potential language and publication bias should be considered. Authors' objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of stabilisation exercises for the treatment of pain and dysfunction in patients with low back pain. Searching PubMed, CINAHL, AMED, PEDro, and the Cochrane Library databases were searched for articles published in English, up to October 2006. The search terms were reported and the reference lists of retrieved articles were scanned. Study selection Randomised controlled trials

2008 DARE.

330. Assessing the effect of sample size, methodological quality and statistical rigour on outcomes of randomised controlled trials on mobilisation, manipulation and massage for low back pain of at least 6 weeks duration

Assessing the effect of sample size, methodological quality and statistical rigour on outcomes of randomised controlled trials on mobilisation, manipulation and massage for low back pain of at least 6 weeks duration Assessing the effect of sample size, methodological quality and statistical rigour on outcomes of randomised controlled trials on mobilisation, manipulation and massage for low back pain of at least 6 weeks duration Assessing the effect of sample size, methodological quality (...) and statistical rigour on outcomes of randomised controlled trials on mobilisation, manipulation and massage for low back pain of at least 6 weeks duration Hettinga DM, Hurley DA, Jackson A, May S, Mercer C, Roberts L CRD summary The review concluded that many trials of manual therapy for lower back pain had shortcomings, but there remained evidence from higher quality trials to support the use of a manual therapy package compared with General Practitioner care for non-specific lower back pain of at least six

2008 DARE.

331. Are physiotherapy exercises effective in reducing chronic low back pain?

Are physiotherapy exercises effective in reducing chronic low back pain? Are physiotherapy exercises effective in reducing chronic low back pain? Are physiotherapy exercises effective in reducing chronic low back pain? Lewis A, Morris M E, Walsh C CRD summary This review concluded that physiotherapy exercise programmes were effective in reducing chronic low back pain, but that there was no consensus for the superiority of any specific technique or exercise format. Lack study details and effect (...) sizes limited interpretation of the results presented, so the authors' conclusions might not be reliable. Authors' objectives To determine the effectiveness of physiotherapy exercises in reducing chronic low back pain. Searching MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, PEDro and Web of Science were searched up to the end of May 2006. Search terms were reported. Reference lists of relevant articles were also searched. Only papers published in English were included

2008 DARE.

332. Surgical versus non-surgical treatment of chronic low back pain: a meta-analysis of randomised trials

Surgical versus non-surgical treatment of chronic low back pain: a meta-analysis of randomised trials Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2008 DARE.

333. Can we predict poor recovery from recent-onset nonspecific low back pain: a systematic review

Can we predict poor recovery from recent-onset nonspecific low back pain: a systematic review Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2008 DARE.

334. Service delivery organisation for acute low back pain

Service delivery organisation for acute low back pain Service delivery organisation for acute low back pain Service delivery organisation for acute low back pain Nic Lochlainn E, Abbotts J, Craig J, Downie S, Eastgate J, Kohli H, Macpherson K, McIntosh H, Riches E, Thompson J, Twaddle S, Wilson S Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database (...) . Citation Nic Lochlainn E, Abbotts J, Craig J, Downie S, Eastgate J, Kohli H, Macpherson K, McIntosh H, Riches E, Thompson J, Twaddle S, Wilson S. Service delivery organisation for acute low back pain. Glasgow: Quality Improvement Scotland (NHS QIS ). HTA Systematic Review 1. 2008 Authors' conclusions The systematic review of scientific literature found a paucity of high quality evidence to inform the organisation of low back pain services in Scotland. Much of the published research on organisation

2008 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

335. Acupuncture for low back pain

Acupuncture for low back pain Acupuncture for low back pain Acupuncture for low back pain Uthman O, Chen Y Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Uthman O, Chen Y. Acupuncture for low back pain. Glasgow: Quality Improvement Scotland (NHS QIS ). Evidence Note 24. 2008 Authors' conclusions There is insufficient evidence to conclude (...) whether acupuncture is effective or cost-effective for acute low back pain (LBP). Acupuncture is more effective than no treatment and sham acupuncture in the short-term for pain relief in chronic LBP. Adding acupuncture to usual care (or specific treatment) is more effective than usual care (or specific treatment) alone for chronic LBP. Two economic evaluations suggest adding acupuncture to usual care is cost-effective compared to usual care alone for subacute and chronic LBP. Evidence directly

2008 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

336. The effects of lifestyle intervention for hypertension on low back pain: a randomized controlled trial. (Abstract)

The effects of lifestyle intervention for hypertension on low back pain: a randomized controlled trial. Randomized controlled trial.To assess the effects of a lifestyle intervention for hypertension on low back pain.According to prospective etiologic studies, a causal association exists between certain lifestyle factors and low back pain. These factors are similar to those that elevate the risk for hypertension. Nevertheless, no randomized controlled trial has assessed effectiveness (...) of lifestyle intervention for the treatment of hypertension on the prevalence of low back pain.A total of 731 hypertensive employees from 45 worksites were assigned to multidisciplinary lifestyle interventions for hypertension in a rehabilitation center or to routine care in occupational or primary healthcare services during 12 months. Questionnaire data on low back pain were used to assess the effects of the intervention on the extent of low back pain and disability.The changes in prevalence and duration

2008 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

337. Comparison of general exercise, motor control exercise and spinal manipulative therapy for chronic low back pain: A randomized trial. (Abstract)

Comparison of general exercise, motor control exercise and spinal manipulative therapy for chronic low back pain: A randomized trial. Practice guidelines recommend various types of exercise and manipulative therapy for chronic back pain but there have been few head-to-head comparisons of these interventions. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to compare effects of general exercise, motor control exercise and manipulative therapy on function and perceived effect of intervention (...) in patients with chronic back pain. Two hundred and forty adults with non-specific low back pain 3months were allocated to groups that received 8weeks of general exercise, motor control exercise or spinal manipulative therapy. General exercise included strengthening, stretching and aerobic exercises. Motor control exercise involved retraining specific trunk muscles using ultrasound feedback. Spinal manipulative therapy included joint mobilization and manipulation. Primary outcomes were patient-specific

2007 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

338. WITHDRAWN: Low level laser therapy for nonspecific low-back pain. Full Text available with Trip Pro

WITHDRAWN: Low level laser therapy for nonspecific low-back pain. Low-back pain (LBP) and related disabilities are major public health problems and a major cause of medical expenses, absenteeism and disablement. Low level laser therapy (LLLT) can be used as a therapeutic intervention for musculoskeletal disorders such as back pain.To assess the effects of LLLT in patients with non-specific low-back pain and to explore the most effective method of administering LLLT for this disorder.We searched (...) for non-specific low-back pain were included.Two authors independently assessed methodological quality using the criteria recommended by the Cochrane Back Review Group and extracted data. Consensus was used to resolve disagreements. Clinically and statistically homogeneous studies were pooled using the fixed-effect model; clinically homogeneous and statistically heterogeneous studies were pooled using the random-effects model.Six RCTs with reasonable quality were included in the review. All of them

2007 Cochrane

339. Diagnosis and treatment of low back pain: a joint clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians and the American Pain Society. (Abstract)

Diagnosis and treatment of low back pain: a joint clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians and the American Pain Society. RECOMMENDATION 1: Clinicians should conduct a focused history and physical examination to help place patients with low back pain into 1 of 3 broad categories: nonspecific low back pain, back pain potentially associated with radiculopathy or spinal stenosis, or back pain potentially associated with another specific spinal cause. The history should (...) include assessment of psychosocial risk factors, which predict risk for chronic disabling back pain (strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 2: Clinicians should not routinely obtain imaging or other diagnostic tests in patients with nonspecific low back pain (strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 3: Clinicians should perform diagnostic imaging and testing for patients with low back pain when severe or progressive neurologic deficits are present

2007 Annals of Internal Medicine

340. WITHDRAWN: Multidisciplinary bio-psycho-social rehabilitation for chronic low-back pain. (Abstract)

WITHDRAWN: Multidisciplinary bio-psycho-social rehabilitation for chronic low-back pain. Chronic low back pain is, in many countries, the main cause of long term disability in middle age. Patients with chronic low back pain are often referred for multidisciplinary treatment. Previous published systematic reviews on this topic included no randomised controlled trials and pooled together controlled and non-controlled studies.To assess the effect of multidisciplinary bio-psycho-social (...) rehabilitation on pain, function, employment, quality of life and global assessment outcomes in subjects with chronic disabling low back pain.We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychLIT, CINAHL, Health STAR, and The Cochrane Library from the beginning of the database to June 1998 using the comprehensive search strategy recommended by the Back Review Group of the Cochrane Collaboration. INTERVENTION specific key words for this review were: patient care team, patient care management, multidisciplinary

2007 Cochrane