Latest & greatest articles for low back pain

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Top results for low back pain

101. Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Back Pain

Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Back Pain Low Back Pain -- Clinical Recommendation Welcome Search Search Specify your search AAFP.org Patient Care Clinical Practice Guideline Low Back Pain Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Back Pain (Endorsed, April 2017) The guideline, Noninvasive Treatments for Acute, Subacute, and Chronic Low Back Pain , was developed by the American College of Physicians and was endorsed by the American Academy of Family Physicians. Key Recommendations Nonpharmacologic (...) treatment, including superficial heat, massage, acupuncture, or spinal manipulation, should be used initially for most patients with acute or subacute low back pain, as they will improve over time regardless of treatment. When pharmacologic treatment is desired, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) or skeletal muscle relaxants should be used. Nonpharmacologic treatment, including exercise, multidisciplinary rehabilitation, acupuncture, mindfulness-based stress reduction, tai chi, yoga, motor

2017 American Academy of Family Physicians

102. Manipulating Research for Spinal Manipulative Therapy for Low Back Pain

Manipulating Research for Spinal Manipulative Therapy for Low Back Pain Tools for Practice is proudly sponsored by the Alberta College of Family Physicians (ACFP). ACFP is a provincial, professional voluntary organization, representing more than 4,500 family physicians, family medicine residents and medical students in Alberta. Established over sixty years ago, the ACFP strives for excellence in family practice through advocacy, continuing medical education, and primary care research (...) . www.acfp.ca February 21, 2017 Manipulating Research for Spinal Manipulative Therapy for Low Back Pain Clinical Question: Is spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) effective for low back pain (LBP)? Bottom Line: Research around SMT is poor, consistently inconsistent, and almost impossible to interpret. Likely no reliable effects in acute LBP, but possible small effects in chronic LBP, at best improved pain ( =0.9 points out of 10) and recovery (for one in ~11 patients at one month) but two thirds of comparisons

2017 Tools for Practice

103. Percutaneous epidural neurolysis and endoscopic neurolysis for the treatment of chronic low back pain

Percutaneous epidural neurolysis and endoscopic neurolysis for the treatment of chronic low back pain Percutaneous epidural neurolysis and endoscopic neurolysis for the treatment of chronic low back pain Percutaneous epidural neurolysis and endoscopic neurolysis for the treatment of chronic low back pain Brito V, Ciapponi A, Augustovski F, Pichon-Riviere A, García Martí S, Alcaraz A, Bardach A, López A, Rey-Ares L Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology (...) assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Brito V, Ciapponi A, Augustovski F, Pichon-Riviere A, García Martí S, Alcaraz A, Bardach A, López A, Rey-Ares L. Percutaneous epidural neurolysis and endoscopic neurolysis for the treatment of chronic low back pain. Buenos Aires: Institute for Clinical Effectiveness and Health Policy (IECS). Informe de Respuesta Rapida No. 483. 2016 Authors' conclusions Evidence of moderate

2017 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

104. Ibuprofen plus paracetamol versus ibuprofen in acute low back pain: a randomized open label multicenter clinical study. (Abstract)

Ibuprofen plus paracetamol versus ibuprofen in acute low back pain: a randomized open label multicenter clinical study. to estimate whether combination of ibuprofen and paracetamol is more effective than ibuprofen in monotherapy, in the treatment of acute low back pain.80 adult patients with acute low back pain were randomized into two subgroups. In the first subgroup, 40 patients were treated with ibuprofen 400mg three times a day (TID), whilst patients in the second subgroup (n=40) were (...) intolerability.compared to ibuprofen monotherapy, combination of ibuprofen and paracetamol may provide faster and longer analgesia in patients with acute low back pain, with equally favorable effect on mobility and functional ability and similar tolerability.

2016 Acta reumatologica portuguesa Controlled trial quality: uncertain

105. More isn’t better with acute low back pain treatment

More isn’t better with acute low back pain treatment More isn't better with acute low back pain treatment Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics More isn't better with acute low back pain treatment View/ Open Date 2016-06 Format Metadata Abstract More isn't better with acute low back pain treatment Adding (...) cyclobenzaprine or oxycodone/acetaminophen to naproxen for the treatment of acute low back pain does nothing more than increase adverse effects. Practice changer: Consider treating patients with acute low back pain with naproxen only, as adding cyclobenzaprine or oxycodone/acetaminophen to scheduled naproxen does not improve functional assessment at 7 days or 3 months and increases adverse effects. URI Part of Citation Journal of Family Practice, 65(6) 2016: 404-406. Rights OpenAccess. This work is licensed

2016 PURLS

106. Low back pain and sciatica in over 16s: assessment and management

Low back pain and sciatica in over 16s: assessment and management L Low back pain and sciatica in o ow back pain and sciatica in ov ver 16s: er 16s: assessment and management assessment and management NICE guideline Published: 30 November 2016 nice.org.uk/guidance/ng59 © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guideline represent the view (...) in this guideline should be interpreted in a way that would be inconsistent with complying with those duties. Commissioners and providers have a responsibility to promote an environmentally sustainable health and care system and should assess and reduce the environmental impact of implementing NICE recommendations wherever possible. Low back pain and sciatica in over 16s: assessment and management (NG59) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions

2016 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

107. Do rocker-sole shoes influence postural stability in chronic low back pain? A randomised trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Do rocker-sole shoes influence postural stability in chronic low back pain? A randomised trial. People with chronic low back pain (CLBP) demonstrate greater postural instability compared with asymptomatic individuals. Rocker-sole shoes are inherently unstable and may serve as an effective balance training device. This study hypothesised that wearing rocker-sole shoes would result in long-term improvement in barefoot postural stability in people with CLBP.20 participants with CLBP were

2016 BMJ open sport & exercise medicine Controlled trial quality: uncertain

108. Neuromuscular exercise and back counselling for female nursing personnel with recurrent non-specific low back pain: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial (NURSE-RCT). Full Text available with Trip Pro

Neuromuscular exercise and back counselling for female nursing personnel with recurrent non-specific low back pain: study protocol of a randomised controlled trial (NURSE-RCT). Nursing personnel have high risk for incidence of low back pain (LBP) followed by development of chronic pain and disability. Multiple risk factors such as patient handling, night shift work and lack of supporting work culture have been identified. In subacute LBP, high-fear avoidance is prognostic for more pain (...) , disability and not returning to work. Lack of leisure-time physical activity predicts long-term sickness absence. The purpose of this study is to compare effectiveness of 6-month neuromuscular exercise and counselling in treating back pain in female nursing personnel with recurrent non-specific LBP pain compared with either (exercise or counselling) alone and a non-treatment control group.The design is of a double-blinded four-arm randomised controlled trial with cost-effectiveness evaluation at 12

2016 BMJ open sport & exercise medicine Controlled trial quality: predicted high

109. Non-specific low back pain. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Non-specific low back pain. Non-specific low back pain affects people of all ages and is a leading contributor to disease burden worldwide. Management guidelines endorse triage to identify the rare cases of low back pain that are caused by medically serious pathology, and so require diagnostic work-up or specialist referral, or both. Because non-specific low back pain does not have a known pathoanatomical cause, treatment focuses on reducing pain and its consequences. Management consists (...) of education and reassurance, analgesic medicines, non-pharmacological therapies, and timely review. The clinical course of low back pain is often favourable, thus many patients require little if any formal medical care. Two treatment strategies are currently used, a stepped approach beginning with more simple care that is progressed if the patient does not respond, and the use of simple risk prediction methods to individualise the amount and type of care provided. The overuse of imaging, opioids

2016 Lancet

110. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Gluteal Trigger Points to Differentiate Radicular From Nonradicular Low Back Pain (Abstract)

The Diagnostic Accuracy of Gluteal Trigger Points to Differentiate Radicular From Nonradicular Low Back Pain Low back pain (LBP) is highly prevalent and costly to the society. Previous studies have shown an association between radicular LBP and trigger points (TrPs) in the superior-lateral quadrant of the gluteal area (GTrP). The objective of current study was to evaluate the diagnostic value of GTrP to predict nerve root involvement among patients with LBP.In a prospective, diagnostic accuracy

2016 EvidenceUpdates

111. Back schools for acute and subacute non-specific low-back pain. (Abstract)

Back schools for acute and subacute non-specific low-back pain. Since the introduction of the Swedish back school in 1969, back schools have frequently been used for treating people with low-back pain (LBP). However, the content of back schools has changed and appears to vary widely today. In this review we defined back school as a therapeutic programme given to groups of people, which includes both education and exercise. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 1999 (...) a placebo (or sham or attention control) or another treatment (physical therapies, myofascial therapy, joint manipulations, advice) on pain, disability, work status and adverse events at short-term, intermediate-term and long-term follow-up. There is very low quality evidence that shows a statistically significant difference between back schools and a placebo (or sham or attention control) for return to work at short-term follow-up in favour of back school. Very low quality evidence suggests that back

2016 Cochrane

112. The Effectiveness of Mechanical Traction Among Subgroups of Patients With Low Back Pain and Leg Pain: A Randomized Trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

The Effectiveness of Mechanical Traction Among Subgroups of Patients With Low Back Pain and Leg Pain: A Randomized Trial Randomized clinical trial. Background The recommended initial management strategy for patients with low back pain and signs of nerve root compression is conservative treatment, but there is little evidence to guide the most appropriate management strategy. Preliminary research suggests that a treatment protocol of mechanical traction and extension-oriented exercises may (...) be effective, particularly in a specific subgroup of patients.To examine the effectiveness of mechanical traction in patients with lumbar nerve root compression and within a predefined subgroup.One hundred twenty patients with low back pain with nerve root compression were recruited from physical therapy clinics. Using predefined subgrouping criteria, patients were stratified at baseline and randomized to receive an extension-oriented treatment approach with or without the addition of mechanical traction

2016 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

113. ReActiv8© implantable device for treating chronic low back pain

ReActiv8© implantable device for treating chronic low back pain ReActiv8® implantable device for treating chronic low back pain ReActiv8® implantable device for treating chronic low back pain NIHR HSRIC Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation NIHR HSRIC. ReActiv8® implantable device for treating chronic low back pain. Birmingham: NIHR Horizon Scanning (...) Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Humans; Low Back Pain; Pain Measurement; Prostheses and Implants Language Published English Country of organisation England English summary An English language summary is available. Address for correspondence NIHR Horizon Scanning Research&Intelligence Centre, University of Birmingham, Institute of Applied Health Research, Public Health building, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT Tel: 0121 414 9077 Email: nihrhsc@contacts.bham.ac.uk AccessionNumber 32016000482 Date

2016 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

114. Noninvasive treatments for low back pain

Noninvasive treatments for low back pain Noninvasive treatments for low back pain Noninvasive treatments for low back pain Chou R, Deyo R, Friedly J, Skelly A, Hashimoto R, Weimer M, Fu R, Dana T, Kraegel P, Griffin J, Grusing S, Brodt E Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Chou R, Deyo R, Friedly J, Skelly A, Hashimoto R (...) , Weimer M, Fu R, Dana T, Kraegel P, Griffin J, Grusing S, Brodt E. Noninvasive treatments for low back pain. Rockville: Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). Comparative Effectiveness Review No. 169. 2016 Authors' objectives Low back pain is common, and many pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies are available. This review examines the evidence on the comparative benefits and harms of noninvasive treatments for low back pain. Authors' conclusions A number of pharmacological

2016 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

115. Frequency of sacroiliitis among patients with low back pain Full Text available with Trip Pro

Frequency of sacroiliitis among patients with low back pain Sacroiliitis is one of the important symptoms in patients attending infectious diseases and rheumatology clinics. Some patients with sacroiliitis are asymptomatic, and some have unspecific symptoms. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of sacroiliitis causes among patients attending Shahid Sadoughi's infectious disease and rheumatology clinics.In this study, we evaluated patients attending Shahid Sadoughi rheumatology

2016 Electronic physician

116. Effect of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction vs Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or Usual Care on Back Pain and Functional Limitations in Adults With Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction vs Cognitive Behavioral Therapy or Usual Care on Back Pain and Functional Limitations in Adults With Chronic Low Back Pain: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) has not been rigorously evaluated for young and middle-aged adults with chronic low back pain.To evaluate the effectiveness for chronic low back pain of MBSR vs cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or usual care.Randomized, interviewer-blind, clinical trial (...) in an integrated health care system in Washington State of 342 adults aged 20 to 70 years with chronic low back pain enrolled between September 2012 and April 2014 and randomly assigned to receive MBSR (n = 116), CBT (n = 113), or usual care (n = 113).CBT (training to change pain-related thoughts and behaviors) and MBSR (training in mindfulness meditation and yoga) were delivered in 8 weekly 2-hour groups. Usual care included whatever care participants received.Coprimary outcomes were the percentages

2016 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

117. Core stability versus conventional exercise for treating non-specific low back pain.

Core stability versus conventional exercise for treating non-specific low back pain. BestBets: Core stability versus conventional exercise for treating non-specific low back pain. Core stability versus conventional exercise for treating non-specific low back pain. Report By: John Davin and Michael Callaghan. - 1st Team Rehabilitation Physiotherapist. Head of Therapies Institution: Manchester United Football Club Date Submitted: 9th December 2015 Date Completed: 17th February 2016 Last Modified (...) : 17th February 2016 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [patients presenting with low back pain] is [a core stability programme more effective than conventional exercise based therapy] at [decreasing pain, increasing mobility and returning to play]. Clinical Scenario A 24 year old male presents with chronic low back pain. Investigations have ruled out any serious disc, joint or bony pathology. Current opinion advocates core stability as the ‘go to’ treatment for this non-specific pain

2016 BestBETS

118. Radiological Diagnostic and Therapeutic Interventions Directed to Lumbar Spine Pathology - Low Back Pain Companion Document

Radiological Diagnostic and Therapeutic Interventions Directed to Lumbar Spine Pathology - Low Back Pain Companion Document application/octet-stream

2016 Institute of Health Economics

119. Noninvasive Treatments for Low Back Pain

Noninvasive Treatments for Low Back Pain Noninvasive Treatments for Low Back Pain: Current State of the Evidence Focus of This Summary This review examines the evidence on the comparative benefits and harms of noninvasive treatments for acute, subacute, and chronic low back pain from 156 studies that were published before April 2015. Excluded from the review were studies conducted among patients with low back pain related to cancer, infection, inflammatory arthropathy, high-velocity trauma (...) , or fracture or low back pain associated with severe or progressive neurological deficits. The full report, listing all studies, is available at www.effectivehealthcare.ahrq.gov/low-back-pain. This summary is provided to assist in informed clinical decisionmaking. However, reviews of evidence should not be construed to represent clinical recommendations or guidelines. Conclusions Several interventions for low back pain are associated with small-to-moderate, primarily short-term effects on pain versus

2016 Effective Health Care Program (AHRQ)

120. How effective are opioids for chronic low back pain?

How effective are opioids for chronic low back pain? How effective are opioids for chronic low back pain? Toggle navigation Shared more. Cited more. Safe forever. Toggle navigation View Item JavaScript is disabled for your browser. Some features of this site may not work without it. Search MOspace This Collection Browse Statistics How effective are opioids for chronic low back pain? View/ Open Date 2015-09 Format Metadata Abstract Q: How effective are opioids for chronic low back pain? Evidence (...) -based answer: Short-term (<4 months) treatment with opioids provides modest relief of chronic low back pain, but only minimal improvement in function compared with placebo (strength of recommendation [SOR]: B, systematic review of lower-quality randomized controlled trials [RCTs]). Tramadol isn’t superior to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for pain relief (SOR: A, consistent results from RCTs). In addition, oxycodone with titrated morphine isn’t better than naproxen for relieving pain

2016 Clinical Inquiries