Latest & greatest articles for mammography

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Top results for mammography

61. Effect of three decades of screening mammography on breast-cancer incidence. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of three decades of screening mammography on breast-cancer incidence. To reduce mortality, screening must detect life-threatening disease at an earlier, more curable stage. Effective cancer-screening programs therefore both increase the incidence of cancer detected at an early stage and decrease the incidence of cancer presenting at a late stage.We used Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data to examine trends from 1976 through 2008 in the incidence of early-stage breast cancer (...) (ductal carcinoma in situ and localized disease) and late-stage breast cancer (regional and distant disease) among women 40 years of age or older.The introduction of screening mammography in the United States has been associated with a doubling in the number of cases of early-stage breast cancer that are detected each year, from 112 to 234 cases per 100,000 women--an absolute increase of 122 cases per 100,000 women. Concomitantly, the rate at which women present with late-stage cancer has decreased

2012 NEJM

62. Use of prior mammograms in the transition to digital mammography: a performance and cost analysis

Use of prior mammograms in the transition to digital mammography: a performance and cost analysis Use of prior mammograms in the transition to digital mammography: a performance and cost analysis Use of prior mammograms in the transition to digital mammography: a performance and cost analysis Taylor-Phillips S, Wallis MG, Duncan A, Gale AG Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary (...) of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary The aim was to examine the costs and the detection performance of digital mammography, with or without previous film mammograms, in the UK NHS breast screening programme. The authors concluded that either digitised or non-digitised film mammograms improved the performance of digital screening and saved costs by reducing the number of normal cases who

2012 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

63. Tipping the Balance of Benefits and Harms to Favor Screening Mammography Starting at Age 40 Years: A Comparative Modeling Study of Risk. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Tipping the Balance of Benefits and Harms to Favor Screening Mammography Starting at Age 40 Years: A Comparative Modeling Study of Risk. Timing of initiation of screening for breast cancer is controversial in the United States.To determine the threshold relative risk (RR) at which the harm-benefit ratio of screening women aged 40 to 49 years equals that of biennial screening for women aged 50 to 74 years.Comparative modeling study.Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program, Breast (...) Cancer Surveillance Consortium, and medical literature.A contemporary cohort of women eligible for routine screening.Lifetime.Societal.Mammography screening starting at age 40 versus 50 years with different screening methods (film, digital) and screening intervals (annual, biennial).life-years gained, breast cancer deaths averted; harms: false-positive mammography findings; harm-benefit ratios: false-positive findings/life-years gained, false-positive findings/deaths averted.Screening average-risk

2012 Annals of Internal Medicine

64. Overdiagnosis of invasive breast cancer due to mammography screening: results from the norwegian screening program. (Abstract)

Overdiagnosis of invasive breast cancer due to mammography screening: results from the norwegian screening program. Precise quantification of overdiagnosis of breast cancer (defined as the percentage of cases of cancer that would not have become clinically apparent in a woman's lifetime without screening) due to mammography screening has been hampered by lack of valid comparison groups that identify incidence trends attributable to screening versus those due to temporal trends in incidence.To (...) estimate the percentage of overdiagnosis of breast cancer attributable to mammography screening.Comparison of invasive breast cancer incidence with and without screening.A nationwide mammography screening program in Norway (inviting women aged 50 to 69 years), gradually implemented from 1996 to 2005.The Norwegian female population.Concomitant incidence of invasive breast cancer from 1996 to 2005 in counties where the screening program was implemented compared with that in counties where the program

2012 Annals of Internal Medicine

65. Personalizing mammography by breast density and other risk factors for breast cancer: analysis of health benefits and cost-effectiveness Full Text available with Trip Pro

Personalizing mammography by breast density and other risk factors for breast cancer: analysis of health benefits and cost-effectiveness Personalizing mammography by breast density and other risk factors for breast cancer: analysis of health benefits and cost-effectiveness Personalizing mammography by breast density and other risk factors for breast cancer: analysis of health benefits and cost-effectiveness Schousboe JT, Kerlikowske K, Loh A, Cummings SR Record Status This is a critical (...) abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. CRD summary This study assessed the cost-effectiveness of breast cancer screening, using mammography, at different intervals taking account of risk factors, such as age, breast density, history of breast biopsy, and family history

2012 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

66. Understanding recent trends in incidence of invasive breast cancer in Norway: age-period-cohort analysis based on registry data on mammography screening and hormone treatment use. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Understanding recent trends in incidence of invasive breast cancer in Norway: age-period-cohort analysis based on registry data on mammography screening and hormone treatment use. To quantify the separate contributions of menopausal hormone treatment and mammography screening activities on trends in incidence of invasive breast cancer between 1987 and 2008.Population study using aggregated data analysed by an extended age-period-cohort model.Norway. Population Norwegian women aged 30-90 between (...) 1987 and 2008, including 50,102 newly diagnosed cases of invasive breast cancer. Main outcomes measures Attributable proportions of mammography screening and hormone treatment to recent incidence of invasive breast cancer, and the remaining variation in incidence after adjustment for mammography screening and hormone treatment.The incidence of invasive breast cancer in Norway increased steadily until 2002, levelled off, and then declined from 2006. All non-linear changes in incidence were explained

2012 BMJ

67. Selenia dimensions digital tomosynthesis system (Hologic Inc.) for diagnostic mammography

Selenia dimensions digital tomosynthesis system (Hologic Inc.) for diagnostic mammography Selenia dimensions digital tomosynthesis system (Hologic Inc.) for diagnostic mammography Selenia dimensions digital tomosynthesis system (Hologic Inc.) for diagnostic mammography Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Selenia dimensions digital tomosynthesis (...) system (Hologic Inc.) for diagnostic mammography. Lansdale: HAYES, Inc.. Healthcare Technology Brief Publication. 2012 Authors' conclusions Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women and the second leading cause of cancer death after lung cancer. According to the American Cancer Society, 230,480 new cases of invasive breast cancer were diagnosed in 2011, and approximately 39,520 deaths were attributed to the disease. Despite widespread use and acceptance of cancer screening

2012 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

68. Detection of breast cancer with addition of annual screening ultrasound or a single screening MRI to mammography in women with elevated breast cancer risk. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Detection of breast cancer with addition of annual screening ultrasound or a single screening MRI to mammography in women with elevated breast cancer risk. Annual ultrasound screening may detect small, node-negative breast cancers that are not seen on mammography. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may reveal additional breast cancers missed by both mammography and ultrasound screening.To determine supplemental cancer detection yield of ultrasound and MRI in women at elevated risk for breast (...) cancer.From April 2004-February 2006, 2809 women at 21 sites with elevated cancer risk and dense breasts consented to 3 annual independent screens with mammography and ultrasound in randomized order. After 3 rounds of both screenings, 612 of 703 women who chose to undergo an MRI had complete data. The reference standard was defined as a combination of pathology (biopsy results that showed in situ or infiltrating ductal carcinoma or infiltrating lobular carcinoma in the breast or axillary lymph nodes

2012 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

69. Overdiagnosis from non-progressive cancer detected by screening mammography: stochastic simulation study with calibration to population based registry data. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Overdiagnosis from non-progressive cancer detected by screening mammography: stochastic simulation study with calibration to population based registry data. To quantify the magnitude of overdiagnosis from non-progressive disease detected by screening mammography, after adjustment for the potential for lead time bias, secular trend in the underlying risk of breast cancer, and opportunistic screening.Approximate bayesian computation analysis with a stochastic simulation model designed (...) to replicate standardised incidence rates of breast cancer. The model components included the lifetime probability of breast cancer, the natural course of breast cancer, and participation in organised and opportunistic mammography screening.Isère, a French administrative region with nearly 1.2 million inhabitants.All women living in Isère and aged 50-69 during 1991-2006.Overdiagnosis, defined as the proportion of non-progressive cancers among all cases of invasive cancer and carcinoma in situ detected 1991

2011 BMJ

70. Is computer aided detection (CAD) cost effective in screening mammography? A model based on the CADET II study

Is computer aided detection (CAD) cost effective in screening mammography? A model based on the CADET II study Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2011 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

71. Cumulative probability of false-positive recall or biopsy recommendation after 10 years of screening mammography: a cohort study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cumulative probability of false-positive recall or biopsy recommendation after 10 years of screening mammography: a cohort study. False-positive mammography results are common. Biennial screening may decrease the cumulative probability of false-positive results across many years of repeated screening but could also delay cancer diagnosis.To compare the cumulative probability of false-positive results and the stage distribution of incident breast cancer after 10 years of annual or biennial (...) screening mammography.Prospective cohort study.7 mammography registries in the National Cancer Institute-funded Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium.169,456 women who underwent first screening mammography at age 40 to 59 years between 1994 and 2006 and 4492 women with incident invasive breast cancer diagnosed between 1996 and 2006.False-positive recalls and biopsy recommendations stage distribution of incident breast cancer.False-positive recall probability was 16.3% at first and 9.6% at subsequent

2011 Annals of Internal Medicine

72. Comparative Effectiveness of Digital Versus Film-Screen Mammography in Community Practice in the United States: A Cohort Study. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Comparative Effectiveness of Digital Versus Film-Screen Mammography in Community Practice in the United States: A Cohort Study. Few studies have examined the comparative effectiveness of digital versus film-screen mammography in U.S. community practice.To determine whether the interpretive performance of digital and film-screen mammography differs.Prospective cohort study.Mammography facilities in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium.329,261 women aged 40 to 79 years underwent 869 286 (...) mammograms (231 034 digital; 638 252 film-screen).Invasive cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ diagnosed within 12 months of a digital or film-screen examination and calculation of mammography sensitivity, specificity, cancer detection rates, and tumor outcomes.Overall, cancer detection rates and tumor characteristics were similar for digital and film-screen mammography, but the sensitivity and specificity of each modality varied by age, tumor characteristics, breast density, and menopausal status

2011 Annals of Internal Medicine

73. Effect of mammography screening on surgical treatment for breast cancer in Norway: comparative analysis of cancer registry data. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of mammography screening on surgical treatment for breast cancer in Norway: comparative analysis of cancer registry data. To determine the effect of mammography screening on surgical treatment for breast cancer.Comparative analysis of data from Norwegian cancer registry.Mammography screening, Norway (screening of women aged 50-69 was introduced sequentially from 1996 to 2004).35,408 women aged 40-79 with invasive breast cancer or ductal carcinoma in situ treated surgically from 1993

2011 BMJ

74. Personalizing mammography by breast density and other risk factors for breast cancer: analysis of health benefits and cost-effectiveness. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Personalizing mammography by breast density and other risk factors for breast cancer: analysis of health benefits and cost-effectiveness. Current guidelines recommend mammography every 1 or 2 years starting at age 40 or 50 years, regardless of individual risk for breast cancer.To estimate the cost-effectiveness of mammography by age, breast density, history of breast biopsy, family history of breast cancer, and screening interval.Markov microsimulation model.Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End (...) Results program, Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium, and the medical literature.U.S. women aged 40 to 49, 50 to 59, 60 to 69, and 70 to 79 years with initial mammography at age 40 years and breast density of Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) categories 1 to 4.Lifetime.National health payer.Mammography annually, biennially, or every 3 to 4 years or no mammography.Costs per quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) gained and number of women screened over 10 years to prevent 1 death from

2011 Annals of Internal Medicine

75. Full-field digital mammography for breast cancer screening

Full-field digital mammography for breast cancer screening Full-field digital mammography for breast cancer screening Full-field digital mammography for breast cancer screening Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Full-field digital mammography for breast cancer screening. Lansdale: HAYES, Inc.. Directory Publication. 2011 Authors' objectives Full (...) -field digital mammography (FFDM) is an alternative to conventional screen-film mammography (SFM), the standard of care for detecting breast cancer. With digital mammography, images of the breast are acquired, displayed, transferred, and stored as digital data for viewing on a computer monitor (soft-copy reading) or for printing and viewing with a light box (hard-copy reading). In contrast to SFM, FFDM simplifies image interpretation because image acquisition, image processing, image review, and data

2011 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

76. Accuracy and outcomes of screening mammography in women with a personal history of early-stage breast cancer. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Accuracy and outcomes of screening mammography in women with a personal history of early-stage breast cancer. Women with a personal history of breast cancer (PHBC) are at risk of developing another breast cancer and are recommended for screening mammography. Few high-quality data exist on screening performance in PHBC women.To examine the accuracy and outcomes of mammography screening in PHBC women relative to screening of similar women without PHBC.Cohort of PHBC women, mammogram matched (...) to non-PHBC women, screened through facilities (1996-2007) affiliated with the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium.There were 58,870 screening mammograms in 19,078 women with a history of early-stage (in situ or stage I-II invasive) breast cancer and 58,870 matched (breast density, age group, mammography year, and registry) screening mammograms in 55,315 non-PHBC women.Mammography accuracy based on final assessment, cancer detection rate, interval cancer rate, and stage at diagnosis.Within 1 year

2011 JAMA

77. Screening Mammography for Women Aged 40 to 49 Years at Average Risk for Breast Cancer

Screening Mammography for Women Aged 40 to 49 Years at Average Risk for Breast Cancer 1 OHTAC Recommendation Screening Mammography for Women Aged 40 to 49 Years at Average Risk for Breast Cancer Updated January 2011 This recommendation summary has been prepared by the Medical Advisory Secretariat of the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care on behalf of the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee. Presented to the Ontario Health Technology Advisory Committee in November, 2010 Issue (...) Background Breast cancer is a disease of aging with a four-fold higher incidence in women 50 to 69 years of age (500 per 100,000 women) compared to women 40 to 49 years of age (140 per 100,000 women). The estimated number of new breast cancer diagnoses in Ontario women 40 to 49 year of age is approximately 1,400 per year. There are approximately 1.02 million women in this age group in Ontario at present. The MAS review assessed the effectiveness of screening (film) mammography in women 40 to 49 years

2011 Health Quality Ontario

78. Effectiveness of mammography screening in reducing breast cancer mortality in women aged 39-49 years: a meta-analysis

Effectiveness of mammography screening in reducing breast cancer mortality in women aged 39-49 years: a meta-analysis Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2011 DARE.

79. Surveillance mammography for detecting ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence and metachronous contralateral breast cancer: a systematic review

Surveillance mammography for detecting ipsilateral breast tumour recurrence and metachronous contralateral breast cancer: a systematic review Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2011 DARE.

80. Effect of screening mammography on breast-cancer mortality in Norway. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of screening mammography on breast-cancer mortality in Norway. A challenge in quantifying the effect of screening mammography on breast-cancer mortality is to provide valid comparison groups. The use of historical control subjects does not take into account chronologic trends associated with advances in breast-cancer awareness and treatment.The Norwegian breast-cancer screening program was started in 1996 and expanded geographically during the subsequent 9 years. Women between the ages (...) of 50 and 69 years were offered screening mammography every 2 years. We compared the incidence-based rates of death from breast cancer in four groups: two groups of women who from 1996 through 2005 were living in counties with screening (screening group) or without screening (nonscreening group); and two historical-comparison groups that from 1986 through 1995 mirrored the current groups.We analyzed data from 40,075 women with breast cancer. The rate of death was reduced by 7.2 deaths per 100,000

2010 NEJM