Latest & greatest articles for palliative care

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on palliative care or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on palliative care and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

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Top results for palliative care

241. Does truth telling improve psychological distress of palliative care patients: a systematic review

Does truth telling improve psychological distress of palliative care patients: a systematic review Does truth telling improve psychological distress of palliative care patients: a systematic review Does truth telling improve psychological distress of palliative care patients: a systematic review Leliopoulo C, Wilkinson S M, Fellowes D Authors' objectives To identify and review studies that measured whether telling the truth has a positive or negative effect on the patients' psychological (...) distress, and to draw conclusions as to whether truth disclosure is beneficial or not in reducing psychological distress in palliative care patients. Searching The following databases were searched: MEDLINE from 1966 to December 2001; EMBASE from 1980 to March 2001; PsycINFO from 1966 to April 2001; CINAHL from 1982 to March 2001; Best Evidence from 1991 to January/February 2001; SIGLE from 1980 to January 2001; and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (Issue 1, 2001). The search terms used

2001 DARE.

242. A palliative-care intervention and death at home: a cluster randomised trial. (Abstract)

A palliative-care intervention and death at home: a cluster randomised trial. The Palliative Medicine Unit at University Hospital of Trondheim, Norway, started an intervention programme that aims to enable patients to spend more time at home and die there if they prefer. Close cooperation was needed with the community health-care professionals, who acted as the principal formal caregivers, and a multidisciplinary consultant team coordinated the care. We did a cluster randomised trial to assess (...) controls died at home (54 [25%] vs 26 [15%], p<0.05). The time spent at home was not significantly increased, although intervention patients spent a smaller proportion of time in nursing homes in the last month of life than did controls (7.2 vs 14.6%, p<0.05). Hospital use was similar in the two groups.The palliative-care intervention enabled more patients to die at home. More resources for care in the home (palliative care training and staff) and an increased focus on use of nursing homes would

2000 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

243. Treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma in Sweden: a health economic comparison of palliative treatment with best supportive care versus palliative treatment with gemcitabine in combination with best supportive care

Treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma in Sweden: a health economic comparison of palliative treatment with best supportive care versus palliative treatment with gemcitabine in combination with best supportive care Treatment of locally advanced pancreatic carcinoma in Sweden: a health economic comparison of palliative treatment with best supportive care versus palliative treatment with gemcitabine in combination with best supportive care Treatment of locally advanced pancreatic (...) carcinoma in Sweden: a health economic comparison of palliative treatment with best supportive care versus palliative treatment with gemcitabine in combination with best supportive care Ragnarson-Tennvall G, Wilking N Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study

1999 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

244. Are some palliative care delivery systems more effective and efficient than others: a systematic review of comparative studies

the effectiveness of different models of palliative care delivery systems. Searching The following sources were searched to March 1997: MEDLINE (from 1966), HealthSTAR (from 1975), CINAHL (from 1982), Cancerlit (from 1982), and the Cochrane Library (Issue 2, 1997). Search strategies, which were adapted for all databases, included the terms 'palliat', 'hospice', 'terminally ill', 'end stage disease' and 'delivery of health care'. In addition, the reference lists of available texts and retrieved articles were (...) Are some palliative care delivery systems more effective and efficient than others: a systematic review of comparative studies Are some palliative care delivery systems more effective and efficient than others: a systematic review of comparative studies Are some palliative care delivery systems more effective and efficient than others: a systematic review of comparative studies Critchley P, Jadad A R, Taniguchi A, Woods A, Stevens R, Reyno L, Whelan T J Authors' objectives To assess

1999 DARE.

245. Patient and carer preference for, and satisfaction with, specialist models of palliative care: a systematic literature review

Patient and carer preference for, and satisfaction with, specialist models of palliative care: a systematic literature review Patient and carer preference for, and satisfaction with, specialist models of palliative care: a systematic literature review Patient and carer preference for, and satisfaction with, specialist models of palliative care: a systematic literature review Wilkinson E K, Salisbury C, Bosanquet N, Franks P J, Kite S, Lorentzon M, Naysmith A Authors' objectives To examine (...) the impact of specialist models of palliative care on consumer satisfaction, opinion and preference. Searching Electronic searches of the following databases were carried out (1978-June 1998): MEDLINE; EMBASE; Index of scientific and technical proceedings; the Cochrane Library; SIGLE (Index of grey literature); NHS Project Research System. Details of the search strategies were provided. The following journals were handsearched (June 1992-June 1996): the Hospice Journal; Palliative Medicine; Journal

1999 DARE.

246. The impact of different models of specialist palliative care on patients' quality of life: a systematic literature review

The impact of different models of specialist palliative care on patients' quality of life: a systematic literature review The impact of different models of specialist palliative care on patients' quality of life: a systematic literature review The impact of different models of specialist palliative care on patients' quality of life: a systematic literature review Salisbury C, Bosanquet N, Wilkinson E K, Franks P J, Kite S, Lorentzon M, Naysmith A Authors' objectives To assess the impact (...) of different models of specialist palliative care on the quality of life of patients. Searching Electronic searches were conducted of the following databases in 1997 for articles published since 1978: MEDLINE, EMBASE, Index of Scientific and Technical Proceedings, the Cochrane Library, SIGLE, NHS Project Research System, Health Planning and Administration, Cancerlit and DHSS data. EMBASE, MEDLINE and the Cochrane Library searches were updated to June 1998. Details of the search strategy were given

1999 DARE.

247. Does hospital at home for palliative care facilitate death at home? Randomised controlled trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Does hospital at home for palliative care facilitate death at home? Randomised controlled trial. To evaluate the impact on place of death of a hospital at home service for palliative care.Pragmatic randomised controlled trial.Former Cambridge health district.229 patients referred to the hospital at home service; 43 randomised to control group (standard care), 186 randomised to hospital at home.Hospital at home versus standard care.Place of death.Twenty five (58%) control patients died at home (...) characteristics of the patients admitted to the service. The study attained less statistical power than initially planned.In a locality with good provision of standard community care we could not show that hospital at home allowed more patients to die at home, although neither does the study refute this. Problems relating to recruitment, attrition, and the vulnerability of the patient group make randomised controlled trials in palliative care difficult. While these difficulties have to be recognised

1999 BMJ Controlled trial quality: uncertain

248. Do specialist palliative care teams improve outcomes for cancer patients: a systematic literature review

Do specialist palliative care teams improve outcomes for cancer patients: a systematic literature review Do specialist palliative care teams improve outcomes for cancer patients: a systematic literature review Do specialist palliative care teams improve outcomes for cancer patients: a systematic literature review Hearn J, Higginson I J Authors' objectives To determine whether there is any evidence that the management of patents with advanced cancer by coordinated or multiprofessional teams (...) , which provide specialist palliative care, improves the quality of care of these patients and their families. Searching The following databases were searched: MEDLINE from 1980 to 1996; PsycINFO from 1984 to 1996; CINAHL from 1982 to 1996; and BIDS, EMBASE, Social SciSearch and IBSS, from 1992 to 1996. The search terms were provided in the paper. Palliative Medicine, Journal of Palliative Care and Progress in Palliative Care were handsearched from their first issues to the end of 1996. Two Internet

1998 DARE.

249. Bus rounds for palliative care education in the community

Bus rounds for palliative care education in the community Bus rounds for palliative care education in the community Bus rounds for palliative care education in the community Bruera E, Selmser P, Pereira J, Brenneis C Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study (...) and the conclusions drawn. Health technology Bus rounds for palliative care education. Type of intervention Education of palliative care specialists, family doctors and medical students. Economic study type Cost-effectiveness analysis. Study population Physicians and nurse palliative care consultants, family doctors, medical students. Setting Community. The economic study was carried out in Alberta, Canada. Dates to which data relate Effectiveness and resource use data related to the period February 1996

1997 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

250. Evaluation of a palliative care service: problems and pitfalls. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Evaluation of a palliative care service: problems and pitfalls. To evaluate a palliative care home support team based on an inpatient unit.Randomised controlled trial with waiting list. Patients in the study group received the service immediately, those in the control group received it after one month. Main comparison point was at one month.A city of 300,000 people with a publicly funded home care service and about 200 general practitioners, most of whom provide home care.Pain and nausea levels (...) were measured at entry to trial and at one month, as were quality of life for patients and care givers' health.Because of early deaths, problems with recruitment, and a low compliance rate for completion of questionnaires, the required sample size was not attained.In designing evaluations of palliative care services, investigators should be prepared to deal with the following issues: attrition due to early death, opposition to randomisation by patients and referral sources, ethical problems raised

1994 BMJ Controlled trial quality: uncertain