Latest & greatest articles for palliative care

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Top results for palliative care

81. Systematic review with meta-analysis: Palliative care improves quality of life and reduces symptom burden in adults with life-limiting illness

Systematic review with meta-analysis: Palliative care improves quality of life and reduces symptom burden in adults with life-limiting illness Palliative care improves quality of life and reduces symptom burden in adults with life-limiting illness | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using (...) your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Palliative care improves quality of life and reduces symptom burden in adults with life-limiting illness Article Text Adult nursing Systematic

2017 Evidence-Based Nursing

82. What processes decrease the risk of opioid toxicity following interventional procedures for uncontrolled pain in palliative care or cancer patients?

What processes decrease the risk of opioid toxicity following interventional procedures for uncontrolled pain in palliative care or cancer patients? Review Methods Search Strategy: A systematic search was conducted across a wide-ranging set of data- bases: Ovid Medline, including In-Process & Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid Embase, Ebsco CINAHL and Cochrane Library. The preliminary search strategy was devel- oped on Ovid Medline using both text words and Medical subject headings from January (...) 2006 to February 2017 restricted to English language humans. The search strategy was modified to capture indexing systems of the other databases. (Search strategies available upon request). To identify additional papers, the following website was searched: palliative care knowledge network Furthermore electronic tables of content for the last two years were scanned for British Journal of Anaesthesia, Journal of Pain and Symptom Management, Pain and Palliative medicine. Reference lists of systematic

2017 Palliative Care Evidence Review Service (PaCERS)

83. Palliative Care in the Outpatient Setting

Palliative Care in the Outpatient Setting ©Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, 2016 Palliative Care in the Outpatient Setting A Comparative Effectiveness Report Final Report April 27, 2016 Completed by: Institute for Clinical and Economic Review ©Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, 2016 Page i AUTHORS: Courtney Cunningham, MPH Program Director Karin Travers, DSc Research Director Rick Chapman, PhD, MS Director of Health Economics Anne Loos, MA Research Associate Erin Lawler, MA (...) Program and Communications Associate Shanshan Liu, MS, MPH Research Associate Steven D. Pearson, MD, MSc President Daniel A. Ollendorf, PhD Chief Scientific Officer DATE OF PUBLICATION: April 27, 2016 ICER would like to thank Rebecca Kirch, JD, Consultant to the Center to Advance Palliative Care for her peer review of the draft report. ©Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, 2016 Page ii About ICER The Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER) is an independent non-profit research

2017 California Technology Assessment Forum

84. Palliative care in heart failure: facts and numbers Full Text available with Trip Pro

Palliative care in heart failure: facts and numbers Millions of people worldwide have heart failure. Despite enormous advances in care that have improved outcome, heart failure remains associated with a poor prognosis. Worldwide, there is poor short-term and long-term survival. The 1 year survival following a heart failure admission is in the range of 20-40% with between-country variation. For those living with heart failure, the symptom burden is high. Studies report that 55 to 95% of patients (...) experience shortness of breath and 63 to 93% experience tiredness. These symptoms are associated with a high level of distress (43-89%). Fewer patients experience symptoms such as constipation (25-30%) or dry mouth (35-74%). However, when they do, such symptoms are associated with high levels of distress (constipation: 15-39%; dry mouth: 14-33%). Psychological symptoms also predominate with possibly as many as 50% experiencing depression. Palliative care services in heart failure are not widely available

2016 ESC heart failure

85. Palliative care interventions in advanced dementia. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Palliative care interventions in advanced dementia. Dementia is a chronic, progressive and ultimately fatal neurodegenerative disease. Advanced dementia is characterised by profound cognitive impairment, inability to communicate verbally and complete functional dependence. Usual care of people with advanced dementia is not underpinned universally by a palliative approach. Palliative care has focused traditionally on care of people with cancer but for more than a decade, there have been (...) increased calls worldwide to extend palliative care services to include all people with life-limiting illnesses in need of specialist care, including people with dementia.To assess the effect of palliative care interventions in advanced dementia and to report on the range of outcome measures used.We searched ALOIS, the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group's Specialized Register on 4 February 2016. ALOIS contains records of clinical trials identified from monthly searches of several major

2016 Cochrane

86. Effect of Inpatient Palliative Care on Quality of Life 2 Weeks After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of Inpatient Palliative Care on Quality of Life 2 Weeks After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Randomized Clinical Trial. During hospitalization for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT), patients receive high-dose chemotherapy before transplantation and experience significant physical and psychological symptoms and poor quality of life (QOL).To assess the effect of inpatient palliative care on patient- and caregiver-reported outcomes during hospitalization for HCT (...) and 3 months after transplantation.Nonblinded randomized clinical trial among 160 adults with hematologic malignancies undergoing autologous/allogeneic HCT and their caregivers (n = 94). The study was conducted from August 2014 to January 2016 in a Boston hospital; follow-up was completed in May 2016.Patients assigned to the intervention (n=81) were seen by palliative care clinicians at least twice a week during HCT hospitalization; the palliative intervention was focused on management of physical

2016 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

87. Subcutaneous Administration of Multiple Medications in Palliative Care Patients: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines

Subcutaneous Administration of Multiple Medications in Palliative Care Patients: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Subcutaneous Administration of Multiple Medications in Palliative Care Patients: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines | CADTH.ca Find the information you need Subcutaneous Administration of Multiple Medications in Palliative Care Patients: Clinical Effectiveness and Guidelines Subcutaneous Administration of Multiple Medications in Palliative Care Patients: Clinical (...) Effectiveness and Guidelines Published on: October 28, 2016 Project Number: RB1029-000 Product Line: Research Type: Devices and Systems Report Type: Summary of Abstracts Result type: Report Question What is the clinical effectiveness of the subcutaneous administration of multiple medications via one site in palliative care patients? What are the evidence-based guidelines regarding the subcutaneous administration of multiple medications for palliative care patients? Key Message No relevant literature

2016 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

88. Effect of Palliative Care-Led Meetings for Families of Patients With Chronic Critical Illness: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effect of Palliative Care-Led Meetings for Families of Patients With Chronic Critical Illness: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Family caregivers of patients with chronic critical illness experience significant psychological distress.To determine whether family informational and emotional support meetings led by palliative care clinicians improve family anxiety and depression.A multicenter randomized clinical trial conducted from October 2010 through November 2014 in 4 medical intensive care units (...) (ICUs). Adult patients (aged ≥21 years) requiring 7 days of mechanical ventilation were randomized and their family surrogate decision makers were enrolled in the study. Observers were blinded to group allocation for the measurement of the primary outcomes.At least 2 structured family meetings led by palliative care specialists and provision of an informational brochure (intervention) compared with provision of an informational brochure and routine family meetings conducted by ICU teams (control

2016 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

89. Palliative Care

Palliative Care ©Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, 2016 Palliative Care in the Outpatient Setting A Comparative Effectiveness Report Final Report April 27, 2016 Completed by: Institute for Clinical and Economic Review ©Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, 2016 Page i AUTHORS: Courtney Cunningham, MPH Program Director Karin Travers, DSc Research Director Rick Chapman, PhD, MS Director of Health Economics Anne Loos, MA Research Associate Erin Lawler, MA Program and Communications (...) Associate Shanshan Liu, MS, MPH Research Associate Steven D. Pearson, MD, MSc President Daniel A. Ollendorf, PhD Chief Scientific Officer DATE OF PUBLICATION: April 27, 2016 ICER would like to thank Rebecca Kirch, JD, Consultant to the Center to Advance Palliative Care for her peer review of the draft report. ©Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, 2016 Page ii About ICER The Institute for Clinical and Economic Review (ICER) is an independent non-profit research organization that evaluates medical

2016 California Technology Assessment Forum

90. Palliative care in patients with heart failure. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Palliative care in patients with heart failure. Despite advances in cardiac therapy, heart failure (HF) remains a progressive, highly symptomatic, and deadly disease that places great demands on patients, caregivers, and healthcare systems. Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to care that focuses on communication, shared decision making, and advance care planning; provides relief from pain and other distressing symptoms; integrates psychological and spiritual aspects of care (...) ; and offers a support system to help families cope during illness and bereavement. Palliative care has applications across the stages of heart failure, including early in the course of illness, often in conjunction with other therapies that are intended to prolong life. However, the incorporation of palliative care into the management of heart failure has been suboptimal for several reasons: uncertainty in the disease trajectory, failure to reward communication between healthcare providers and patients

2016 BMJ

91. Quantitative study?other: Costs incurred by family caregivers of patients with palliative care needs

Quantitative study?other: Costs incurred by family caregivers of patients with palliative care needs Costs incurred by family caregivers of patients with palliative care needs | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers (...) of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Costs incurred by family caregivers of patients with palliative care needs Article Text Nursing issues Quantitative study—other Costs incurred by family caregivers of patients with palliative care needs Ronda G Hughes

2016 Evidence-Based Nursing

92. Palliative Care and Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke: A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association

palliation and family support. MCS and Palliative Care Except for emergency situations, prospective MCS patients should meet with palliative care providers before MCS implantation to assist them with the decision-making process and to help with their perioperative management. Of note, inclusion of a palliative care specialist on the MCS team is mandated for obtaining VAD certification from The Joint Commission. Although The Joint Commission requires involvement of palliative care specialists for patients (...) Palliative Care and Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke: A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association Palliative Care and Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke: A Policy Statement From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association | Circulation Search Hello Guest! Login to your account Email Password Keep me logged in Search October 2019 September 2019 August 2019 July 2019 June 2019 May 2019 April 2019 March 2019 February 2019 January 2019 This site

2016 American Heart Association

93. Integration of Palliative Care Into Standard Oncology Care Full Text available with Trip Pro

Integration of Palliative Care Into Standard Oncology Care Integration of Palliative Care Into Standard Oncology Care: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update | Journal of Clinical Oncology Search in: Menu Article Tools ASCO SPECIAL ARTICLE Article Tools OPTIONS & TOOLS COMPANION ARTICLES No companion articles ARTICLE CITATION DOI: 10.1200/JCO.2016.70.1474 Journal of Clinical Oncology - published online before print October 31, 2016 PMID: Integration (...) of Palliative Care Into Standard Oncology Care: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update x Betty R. Ferrell , x Jennifer S. Temel , x Sarah Temin , x Erin R. Alesi , x Tracy A. Balboni , x Ethan M. Basch , x Janice I. Firn , x Judith A. Paice , x Jeffrey M. Peppercorn , x Tanyanika Phillips , x Ellen L. Stovall , x Camilla Zimmermann , and x Thomas J. Smith Betty R. Ferrell, City of Hope Medical Center, Duarte, CA; Jennifer S. Temel and Jeffrey M. Peppercorn, Massachusetts

2016 American Society of Clinical Oncology Guidelines

94. Palliative care - cough

of search A literature search was conducted for guidelines, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials on primary care management of palliative care - cough. Search dates March 2013 - October 2016 Key search terms Various combinations of searches were carried out. The terms listed below are the core search terms that were used for Medline. exp Palliative Care/, exp Terminal Care/, exp Terminally Ill/, palliat$.tw., (terminal adj care).tw., (palliative or terminal$ or end of life).tw., (advanced (...) Palliative care - cough Palliative care - cough - NICE CKS Share Palliative care - cough: Summary Cough is a defensive reflex that occurs in response to stimulation of irritant receptors which are found in the airways. It has two functions — to prevent foreign material entering the lower respiratory tract, and to clear secretions from the lungs and airways. Cough in people with cancer is most commonly associated with cancer of the airways, lungs, pleura, and mediastinum, but tumours

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

95. Palliative care - general issues

of searches were carried out. The terms listed below are the core search terms that were used for Medline. exp Palliative Care/, exp Terminal Care/, exp Terminally Ill/, palliat$.tw., (terminal adj care).tw., (palliative or terminal$ or end of life).tw., (advanced adj disease).tw. Sources of guidelines Medline (with guideline filter) (occupational health practice) Sources of systematic reviews and meta-analyses : Systematic reviews Protocols Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects Medline (...) Palliative care - general issues Palliative care - general issues - NICE CKS Share Palliative care - general issues: Summary Palliative care is defined as the active holistic care of people with advanced, progressive illness. Professionals providing general palliative care services should: Be involved as early as possible after diagnosis. Aim to meet the needs of the patient and their family within the limits of their knowledge and competence. Seek specialist advice or refer the patient

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

96. Palliative care - constipation

of constipation in palliative care. Search dates November 2012 - October 2016 Key search terms Various combinations of searches were carried out. The terms listed below are the core search terms that were used for Medline. exp Palliative Care/, exp Terminal Care/, exp Terminally Ill/, palliat$.tw., (terminal adj care).tw., (palliative or terminal$ or end of life).tw., (advanced adj disease).tw. exp Constipation/, constipat$.tw., exp Fecal Impaction/, ((fecal or faecal) adj impact$).tw., ((fecal or faecal) adj (...) Palliative care - constipation Palliative care - constipation - NICE CKS Share Palliative care - constipation: Summary Constipation is defecation that is unsatisfactory because of infrequent stools, difficult stool passage, or seemingly incomplete defecation. Stools are often dry and hard, and may be abnormally large or abnormally small. About 80% of people with cancer will require treatment with laxatives at some time. People receiving palliative care have multiple causes of constipation

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

97. Palliative care - secretions

and on the website. Search strategy Search strategy Scope of search A literature search was conducted for guidelines, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials on primary care management of palliative care - secretions. Search dates August 2012 - October 2016 Key search terms Various combinations of searches were carried out. The terms listed below are the core search terms that were used for Medline. exp Palliative Care/, exp Terminal Care/, exp Terminally Ill/, palliat$.tw., (terminal adj care).tw (...) Palliative care - secretions Palliative care - secretions - NICE CKS Share Palliative care - secretions: Summary During the terminal phase of a person's illness, airway secretions may accumulate and result in gurgling and rattling noises during inspiration and expiration. It may be difficult to tell whether noisy secretions in the last few hours of life are causing distress to the person, but such noises may be distressing to some families or carers. Listen to the concerns and fears

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

98. Palliative care - nausea and vomiting

the vomiting centre via the vagus and splanchnic nerves [ ]. Anti-emetics active at the vomiting centre may therefore help to palliate nausea in this situation [ ]; cyclizine acts on acetylcholine and histamine type 1 (H 1 ) receptors in the vomiting centre [ ]; [ ]. The recommended anti-emetic doses are consistent with specialist palliative care guidelines for the management of nausea and vomiting [ ; ], palliative care literature from a textbook [ ], and the British National Formulary [ ]. Gastric stasis (...) Palliative care - nausea and vomiting Palliative care - nausea and vomiting - NICE CKS Share Palliative care - nausea and vomiting: Summary Nausea is an unpleasant sensation of the need to vomit, which is often accompanied by autonomic symptoms (for example pallor, cold sweat, salivation, and tachycardia). Vomiting (emesis) is the forceful ejection of stomach contents through the mouth. There are many causes of nausea and vomiting in the palliative care setting, including: Drugs (for example

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

99. Palliative care - dyspnoea

Palliative care - dyspnoea Palliative care - dyspnoea - NICE CKS Share Palliative care - dyspnoea: Summary Breathlessness is an objective observable sign, whereas dyspnoea is a subjective described symptoms of difficulty in breathing. Anxiety is often a major component of dyspnoea. Dyspnoea can result from impaired ventilation or increased ventilatory demand, or both factors. There are multiple possible causes of dyspnoea in people with cancer, including: Direct causes — such as primary lung (...) cancer or lung metastases. Indirect effects of cancer — such as pleural effusion, superior vena cava syndrome, anaemia, pulmonary embolism, and surgery. Non-malignant causes — such as pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, heart failure, and anxiety. Assessment of someone with dyspnoea in a palliative care setting involves asking about: Features of the dyspnoea (for example severity, timing, onset, and precipitating and exacerbating factors). Associated physical symptoms (for example cough

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

100. Palliative cancer care - pain

Palliative cancer care - pain Palliative cancer care - pain - NICE CKS Share Palliative cancer care - pain: Summary Cancer-related pain may be persistent or breakthrough (episodic), and influenced by physical, psychological, social and spiritual factors. Breakthrough pain may be: Unpredictable (spontaneous). Predictable (incident) and related to movement or activity. The type of pain experienced depends on the underlying cause, and may be somatic, visceral or neuropathic pain. It can be caused (...) by direct effects of a tumour, cancer treatment, related to procedures such as dressing changes, or unrelated to the underlying cancer. When assessing pain for a person in palliative care: A validated structured pain assessment tool may be helpful. The impact on quality of life should be discussed. If appropriate, an examination should be performed — looking particularly for specific points of tenderness and signs of neurological deficit which may suggest spinal cord compression. Investigations may

2016 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries