Latest & greatest articles for preeclampsia

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on preeclampsia or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on preeclampsia and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for preeclampsia

41. Protective Role of Maternal P.VAL158MET Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Polymorphism against Early-Onset Preeclampsia and its Complications Full Text available with Trip Pro

Protective Role of Maternal P.VAL158MET Catechol-O-Methyltransferase Polymorphism against Early-Onset Preeclampsia and its Complications Up until now there have been contradictory data about the association between p.Val158Met catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) polymorphism and risk of preeclampsia (PE). The goal of this study was to assess the potential correlation between p.Val158Met COMT polymorphism and risk of early-onset PE, risk of a severe form of early-onset PE, as well as risk

2016 Journal of medical biochemistry

42. First trimester screening for pre-eclampsia Full Text available with Trip Pro

First trimester screening for pre-eclampsia The commercial availability of tests in the first trimester of pregnancy that predict the later development of pre-eclampsia has prompted considerable debate regarding their clinical utility and the degree to which they fulfil the longstanding principles of screening. Such tests have been shown to achieve detection rates for early pre-eclampsia (requiring delivery prior to 34 weeks) of over 90%, for a false positive rate of 10%. However (...) , their capacity to predict later onset pre-eclampsia, which accounts for the bulk of the disease burden, is much more limited. The relatively few studies validating the performance of these tests in different populations have demonstrated significant variations in performance. Moreover, prospective research confirming that the administration of aspirin to those screened to be high risk reduces the incidence of pre-eclampsia is yet to be completed, and there may be harms in restricting aspirin therapy

2016 Obstetric medicine

43. The sFlt-1:PlGF Ratio in Women with Suspected Preeclampsia. Full Text available with Trip Pro

26735990 N Engl J Med. 2016 May 5;374(18):1785 27144855 Female Humans Pre-Eclampsia diagnosis Pregnancy Pregnancy Proteins blood Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1 blood 2016 5 5 6 0 2016 5 6 6 0 2016 5 6 6 1 ppublish 27144854 10.1056/NEJMc1602338 10.1056/NEJMc1602338#SA2 (...) The sFlt-1:PlGF Ratio in Women with Suspected Preeclampsia. 27144854 2016 05 05 2018 12 02 1533-4406 374 18 2016 05 05 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. The sFlt-1:PlGF Ratio in Women with Suspected Preeclampsia. 1785-6 10.1056/NEJMc1602338 Zeisler Harald H Hund Martin M Verlohren Stefan S eng Letter Comment United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 0 Pregnancy Proteins EC 2.7.10.1 Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1 AIM IM N Engl J Med. 2016 Jan 7;374(1):13-22

2016 NEJM

44. The sFlt-1:PlGF Ratio in Women with Suspected Preeclampsia. Full Text available with Trip Pro

daniele.bolla@insel.ch. eng Letter Comment United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 0 Pregnancy Proteins EC 2.7.10.1 Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1 AIM IM N Engl J Med. 2016 Jan 7;374(1):13-22 26735990 N Engl J Med. 2016 May 5;374(18):1785-6 27144854 Female Humans Pre-Eclampsia diagnosis Pregnancy Pregnancy Proteins blood Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1 blood 2016 5 5 6 0 2016 5 6 6 0 2016 5 6 6 1 ppublish 27144855 10.1056/NEJMc1602338 10.1056/NEJMc1602338#SA1 (...) The sFlt-1:PlGF Ratio in Women with Suspected Preeclampsia. 27144855 2016 05 05 2018 12 02 1533-4406 374 18 2016 05 05 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. The sFlt-1:PlGF Ratio in Women with Suspected Preeclampsia. 1785 10.1056/NEJMc1602338 Bolla Daniele D University Hospital of Bern, Bern, Switzerland daniele.bolla@insel.ch. Papadia Andrea A University Hospital of Bern, Bern, Switzerland daniele.bolla@insel.ch. Raio Luigi L University Hospital of Bern, Bern, Switzerland

2016 NEJM

45. For Pregnant Women With Periodontitis, Periodontal Therapy Does Not Reduce The Incidence of Pre-eclampsia

thought to be related, none of the RTCs demonstrated a reduction in pre-eclampsia after a successful periodontal treatment was delivered (overall Risk Ratio of pre-eclampsia for the three RCTs=1.0/ 95% Confidence interval =0.78, 1.28). The statistical heterogeneity was not found to be significant, supported with a p value of 0.198. Evidence Search “Periodontal Diseases” [MeSH] OR periodont *gingivitis) AND (“Pre-Eclampsia” [MeSH] OR preeclampsia OR eclampsia OR eclamp* OR proteinuria OR “pregnancy (...) review not only focuses on the prevalence of pre-eclampsia in pregnant women, but also the effect of periodontal treatment during different stages of gestational period to minimize the risk of complications such as preeclampsia. Applicability This evidence based review shows that pregnant women with periodontal disease receiving periodontal therapy will not exhibit a minimized risk of getting complications such as pre-eclampsia. This information is also pertinent to dental practitioners who seek

2016 UTHSCSA Dental School CAT Library

46. Predictive Value of the sFlt-1:PlGF Ratio in Women with Suspected Preeclampsia. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Predictive Value of the sFlt-1:PlGF Ratio in Women with Suspected Preeclampsia. The ratio of soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt-1) to placental growth factor (PlGF) is elevated in pregnant women before the clinical onset of preeclampsia, but its predictive value in women with suspected preeclampsia is unclear.We performed a prospective, multicenter, observational study to derive and validate a ratio of serum sFlt-1 to PlGF that would be predictive of the absence or presence (...) of preeclampsia in the short term in women with singleton pregnancies in whom preeclampsia was suspected (24 weeks 0 days to 36 weeks 6 days of gestation). Primary objectives were to assess whether low sFlt-1:PlGF ratios (at or below a derived cutoff) predict the absence of preeclampsia within 1 week after the first visit and whether high ratios (above the cutoff) predict the presence of preeclampsia within 4 weeks.In the development cohort (500 women), we identified an sFlt-1:PlGF ratio cutoff of 38

2016 NEJM

47. Improving the Prediction of Preeclampsia. (Abstract)

Factor Receptor-1 AIM IM N Engl J Med. 2016 Jan 7;374(1):13-22 26735990 Female Humans Pre-Eclampsia diagnosis Pregnancy Pregnancy Proteins blood Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1 blood 2016 1 7 6 0 2016 1 7 6 0 2016 1 21 6 0 ppublish 26735997 10.1056/NEJMe1515223 (...) Improving the Prediction of Preeclampsia. 26735997 2016 01 20 2018 12 02 1533-4406 374 1 2016 Jan 07 The New England journal of medicine N. Engl. J. Med. Improving the Prediction of Preeclampsia. 83-4 10.1056/NEJMe1515223 Seely Ellen W EW From the Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Hypertension Division, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston (E.W.S.). Solomon Caren G CG eng Editorial Comment United States N Engl J Med 0255562 0028-4793 0 Pregnancy Proteins EC 2.7.10.1 Vascular Endothelial Growth

2016 NEJM

49. Cohort study: The combination of maternal early pregnancy characteristics and current antenatal blood pressure measurement from 28?weeks? gestation improves the prediction of women at risk of developing pre-eclampsia

Cohort study: The combination of maternal early pregnancy characteristics and current antenatal blood pressure measurement from 28?weeks? gestation improves the prediction of women at risk of developing pre-eclampsia The combination of maternal early pregnancy characteristics and current antenatal blood pressure measurement from 28 weeks’ gestation improves the prediction of women at risk of developing pre-eclampsia | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service (...) name or password? You are here The combination of maternal early pregnancy characteristics and current antenatal blood pressure measurement from 28 weeks’ gestation improves the prediction of women at risk of developing pre-eclampsia Article Text Prognosis Cohort study The combination of maternal early pregnancy characteristics and current antenatal blood pressure measurement from 28 weeks’ gestation improves the prediction of women at risk of developing pre-eclampsia Fergus P McCarthy 1 , Louise C

2016 Evidence-Based Medicine

50. Antenatal blood pressure for prediction of pre-eclampsia, preterm birth, and small for gestational age babies: development and validation in two general population cohorts. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Antenatal blood pressure for prediction of pre-eclampsia, preterm birth, and small for gestational age babies: development and validation in two general population cohorts. Can routine antenatal blood pressure measurements between 20 and 36 weeks' gestation contribute to the prediction of pre-eclampsia and its associated adverse outcomes?This study used repeated antenatal measurements of blood pressure from 12 996 women in the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) to develop (...) at different gestational ages from 20-36 weeks.The addition of blood pressure measurements from 28 weeks onwards improved prediction models compared with use of early pregnancy risk factors alone, but they contributed little to the prediction of preterm birth or small for gestational age. Though multiple imputation of missing data was used to increase the sample size and minimise selection bias, the validation sample might have been slightly underpowered as the number of cases of pre-eclampsia was just

2015 BMJ

51. Association Between Preeclampsia and Congenital Heart Defects. Full Text available with Trip Pro

women who delivered an infant with or without heart defects in any Quebec hospital were included (N = 1,942,072 neonates).Preeclampsia or eclampsia with onset before or after 34 weeks of gestation.Presence of any critical or noncritical congenital heart defect detected in infants at birth, comparing prevalence in those exposed and not exposed to preeclampsia.The absolute prevalence of congenital heart defects was higher for infants of women with preeclampsia than those without it. Infants of women (...) Association Between Preeclampsia and Congenital Heart Defects. The risk of congenital heart defects in infants of women who had preeclampsia during pregnancy is poorly understood, despite shared angiogenic pathways in both conditions.To determine the prevalence of congenital heart defects in offspring of women with preeclampsia.Population-level analysis of live births before discharge, 1989-2012, was conducted for the entire province of Quebec, comprising a quarter of Canada's population. All

2015 JAMA

52. Pre-eclampsia. (Abstract)

Pre-eclampsia. Pre-eclampsia affects 3-5% of pregnancies and is traditionally diagnosed by the combined presentation of high blood pressure and proteinuria. New definitions also include maternal organ dysfunction, such as renal insufficiency, liver involvement, neurological or haematological complications, uteroplacental dysfunction, or fetal growth restriction. When left untreated, pre-eclampsia can be lethal, and in low-resource settings, this disorder is one of the main causes of maternal (...) and child mortality. In the absence of curative treatment, the management of pre-eclampsia involves stabilisation of the mother and fetus, followed by delivery at an optimal time. Although algorithms to predict pre-eclampsia are promising, they have yet to become validated. Simple preventive measures, such as low-dose aspirin, calcium, and diet and lifestyle interventions, show potential but small benefit. Because pre-eclampsia predisposes mothers to cardiovascular disease later in life, pregnancy

2015 Lancet

53. Assessment of glycogen phosphorylase isoenzyme BB as a biomarker for pre-eclampsia and small for gestational age. (Abstract)

Assessment of glycogen phosphorylase isoenzyme BB as a biomarker for pre-eclampsia and small for gestational age. Glycogen phosphorylase is a key enzyme in the regulation of glycogen metabolism and consists of three isoenzymes, including glycogen phosphorylase isoenzyme BB (GPBB). Pre-eclampsia, gestational hypertension, and small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants are complications in about 15% of all nulliparous pregnancies. Biomarkers for these adverse pregnancy outcomes remain elusive. GPBB (...) has been proposed as a potential biomarker for the detection of these adverse outcomes. We aimed to investigate this hypothesis.Blood samples from women with pre-eclampsia or SGA were analysed from the time of disease presentation and from samples collected at 15 and 20 weeks' gestation. They were compared with control samples obtained from women recruited to the Screening for Pregnancy Endpoints (SCOPE) study. These control samples were from healthy women with uncomplicated pregnancies matched

2015 Lancet

54. Cohort study: Pregnant women with schizophrenia are at higher risk of pre-eclampsia, venous thromboembolism and adverse neonatal outcomes

Cohort study: Pregnant women with schizophrenia are at higher risk of pre-eclampsia, venous thromboembolism and adverse neonatal outcomes Pregnant women with schizophrenia are at higher risk of pre-eclampsia, venous thromboembolism and adverse neonatal outcomes | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our (...) . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Pregnant women with schizophrenia are at higher risk of pre-eclampsia, venous thromboembolism and adverse neonatal outcomes Article

2015 Evidence-Based Nursing

55. Systematic review with meta-analysis: Low-dose aspirin reduces morbidity and mortality in pregnant women at high-risk for preeclampsia

Systematic review with meta-analysis: Low-dose aspirin reduces morbidity and mortality in pregnant women at high-risk for preeclampsia Low-dose aspirin reduces morbidity and mortality in pregnant women at high-risk for preeclampsia | Evidence-Based Nursing We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username (...) and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Low-dose aspirin reduces morbidity and mortality in pregnant women at high-risk for preeclampsia Article Text Midwifery Systematic review with meta-analysis Low-dose

2015 Evidence-Based Nursing

56. Systematic review: Updated review identifies no adverse impact on mother or offspring during the perinatal period of aspirin use for prevention of preeclampsia Full Text available with Trip Pro

US Preventive Service Task Force recommendations and is reassuring in that the current, more widespread use of aspirin has not led to the identification of any adverse effects during pregnancy or in the immediate postnatal period from aspirin use. References US Preventive Services Task Force . Duley L , Henderson-Smart DJ , Meher S , et al . Antiplatelet agents for preventing pre-eclampsia and its complications . Askie LM , Duley L , Henderson-Smart DJ , et al . Antiplatelet agents for prevention (...) of pre-eclampsia: a meta-analysis of individual patient data . Footnotes Competing interests None. Provenance and peer review Commissioned; internally peer reviewed. Request Permissions If you wish to reuse any or all of this article please use the link below which will take you to the Copyright Clearance Center’s RightsLink service. You will be able to get a quick price and instant permission to reuse the content in many different ways. Copyright information: Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

2015 Evidence-Based Medicine

57. First-Trimester Risk Assessment for Early-Onset Preeclampsia

First-Trimester Risk Assessment for Early-Onset Preeclampsia Page Not Found | ACOG Clinical Information Practice Management Career Support Education & Events Advocacy Topics Education Events Clinical Topics Hi, Education Events Clinical Topics Page Not Found The page you're trying to access is currently unavailable. It may have moved during our website redesign. Try searching below or visiting our to find the resource you need. ACOG Sites ACOG Sites American College of Obstetricians

2015 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

58. Gestational Hypertension and Preeclampsia in Living Kidney Donors. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Gestational Hypertension and Preeclampsia in Living Kidney Donors. Young women wishing to become living kidney donors frequently ask whether nephrectomy will affect their future pregnancies.We conducted a retrospective cohort study of living kidney donors involving 85 women (131 pregnancies after cohort entry) who were matched in a 1:6 ratio with 510 healthy nondonors from the general population (788 pregnancies after cohort entry). Kidney donations occurred between 1992 and 2009 in Ontario (...) , Canada, with follow-up through linked health care databases until March 2013. Donors and nondonors were matched with respect to age, year of cohort entry, residency (urban or rural), income, number of pregnancies before cohort entry, and the time to the first pregnancy after cohort entry. The primary outcome was a hospital diagnosis of gestational hypertension or preeclampsia. Secondary outcomes were each component of the primary outcome examined separately and other maternal and fetal

2014 NEJM

59. Low-Dose Aspirin Use for the Prevention of Morbidity and Mortality From Preeclampsia: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Low-Dose Aspirin Use for the Prevention of Morbidity and Mortality From Preeclampsia: U.S. Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. Update of the 1996 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on aspirin prophylaxis in pregnancy.The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the effectiveness of low-dose aspirin in preventing preeclampsia in women at increased risk and in decreasing adverse maternal and perinatal health outcomes, and assessed the maternal and fetal harms (...) of low-dose aspirin during pregnancy.This recommendation applies to asymptomatic pregnant women who are at increased risk for preeclampsia and who have no prior adverse effects with or contraindications to low-dose aspirin.The USPSTF recommends the use of low-dose aspirin (81 mg/d) as preventive medication after 12 weeks of gestation in women who are at high risk for preeclampsia. (B recommendation).

2014 Annals of Internal Medicine

60. Low-dose aspirin for the prevention of morbidity and mortality from pre-eclampsia: a systematic evidence review for the U.S. preventive services task force

Low-dose aspirin for the prevention of morbidity and mortality from pre-eclampsia: a systematic evidence review for the U.S. preventive services task force Low-dose aspirin for the prevention of morbidity and mortality from pre-eclampsia: a systematic evidence review for the U.S. preventive services task force Low-dose aspirin for the prevention of morbidity and mortality from pre-eclampsia: a systematic evidence review for the U.S. preventive services task force Henderson JT, Whitlock EP (...) , O'Connor E, Senger CA, Thompson JH, Rowland MG Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Henderson JT, Whitlock EP, O'Connor E, Senger CA, Thompson JH, Rowland MG. Low-dose aspirin for the prevention of morbidity and mortality from pre-eclampsia: a systematic evidence review for the U.S. preventive services task force. Rockville: Agency

2014 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.