Latest & greatest articles for preeclampsia

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Top results for preeclampsia

121. Accuracy of fibronectin tests for the prediction of pre-eclampsia: a systematic review

Accuracy of fibronectin tests for the prediction of pre-eclampsia: a systematic review Accuracy of fibronectin tests for the prediction of pre-eclampsia: a systematic review Accuracy of fibronectin tests for the prediction of pre-eclampsia: a systematic review Leeflang M M, Cnossen J S, van der Post J A, Mol B W, Khan K S, ter Riet G CRD summary The review assessed the accuracy of plasma fibronectin in predicting pre-eclampsia. It was generally well-conducted and well-reported (...) , but the available data were limited and the index test, diagnostic threshold and definition of pre-eclampsia varied between the studies. The authors concluded that fibronectin shows promise but more research is required; this is a reasonable conclusion for the limited data available. Authors' objectives To determine the accuracy of fibronectin tests in predicting early pre-eclampsia. Searching MEDLINE (1953 to 2004), EMBASE (1980 to 2004), MEDION (1974 to 2004) and the Cochrane Library (Issue 3, 2004) were

2007 DARE.

122. Progesterone for preventing pre-eclampsia and its complications. (Abstract)

Progesterone for preventing pre-eclampsia and its complications. In the past, progesterone has been advocated for prevention of pre-eclampsia and its complications. Although progestogens are not used for this purpose in current clinical practice, it remains relevant to assess the evidence on their possible benefits and harms.To assess the effects of progesterone during pregnancy on the risk of developing pre-eclampsia and its complications.We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth (...) Group's Trials Register (April 2006), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2006, Issue 2), and EMBASE (1974 to August 2005).Randomised trials evaluating progesterone or any other progestogen during pregnancy for prevention of pre-eclampsia and its complications were included.Two review authors independently assessed studies for inclusion and extracted data.Two trials of uncertain quality were included (296 women). These trials compared progesterone injections

2006 Cochrane

123. Trends in fetal and infant survival following preeclampsia. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Trends in fetal and infant survival following preeclampsia. Management of preeclampsia often culminates in induced delivery of a very preterm infant. While early termination protects the fetus from an intrauterine death, the newborn then faces increased risks associated with preterm delivery. This practice has increased in recent decades, but its net effect on fetal and infant survival has not been assessed.To assess the effect on fetal and infant survival of increased rates of early delivery

2006 JAMA

124. Soluble endoglin and other circulating antiangiogenic factors in preeclampsia. (Abstract)

Soluble endoglin and other circulating antiangiogenic factors in preeclampsia. Alterations in circulating soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt1), an antiangiogenic protein, and placental growth factor (PlGF), a proangiogenic protein, appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of preeclampsia. Since soluble endoglin, another antiangiogenic protein, acts together with sFlt1 to induce a severe preeclampsia-like syndrome in pregnant rats, we examined whether it is associated with preeclampsia (...) in women.We performed a nested case-control study of healthy nulliparous women within the Calcium for Preeclampsia Prevention trial. The study included all 72 women who had preterm preeclampsia (<37 weeks), as well as 480 randomly selected women--120 women with preeclampsia at term (at > or =37 weeks), 120 women with gestational hypertension, 120 normotensive women who delivered infants who were small for gestational age, and 120 normotensive controls who delivered infants who were not small

2006 NEJM

125. Marine oil, and other prostaglandin precursor, supplementation for pregnancy uncomplicated by pre-eclampsia or intrauterine growth restriction. (Abstract)

Marine oil, and other prostaglandin precursor, supplementation for pregnancy uncomplicated by pre-eclampsia or intrauterine growth restriction. Population studies have shown that higher intakes of marine foods during pregnancy are associated with longer gestations, higher infant birthweights and a low incidence of pre-eclampsia. It is suggested that the fatty acids of marine foods may be the underlying cause of these associations.To estimate the effects of marine oil, and other prostaglandin (...) precursor, supplementation during pregnancy on the risk of pre-eclampsia, preterm birth, low birthweight and small-for-gestational age.We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group Trials Register (December 2005), The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2005, Issue 2) and MEDLINE (1966 to April 2005).All randomised trials comparing oral marine oil, or other prostaglandin precursor, supplementation during pregnancy with either placebo or no treatment. Trials

2006 Cochrane

126. Garlic for preventing pre-eclampsia and its complications. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Garlic for preventing pre-eclampsia and its complications. The suggestion that garlic may lower blood pressure, inhibit platelet aggregation, and reduce oxidative stress has led to the hypothesis that it may have a role in preventing pre-eclampsia and its complications.To assess the effects of garlic on prevention of pre-eclampsia and its complications.We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group Trials Register (February 2006), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (...) (The Cochrane Library 2005, Issue 2), and EMBASE (1974 to April 2005).Studies were included if they were randomised trials evaluating the effects of garlic on prevention of pre-eclampsia and its complications.Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion and extracted data. Data were entered on Review Manager software for analysis, and double checked for accuracy.One trial (100 women) of uncertain quality compared garlic with placebo. Another study was excluded as 29% of women were lost

2006 Cochrane

127. Chinese herbal medicine for the treatment of pre-eclampsia. (Abstract)

Chinese herbal medicine for the treatment of pre-eclampsia. Pre-eclampsia is a common disorder of pregnancy with uncertain etiology. In Chinese herbal medicines, a number of herbs are used for treating pre-eclampsia. Traditional Chinese medicine considers that, when a woman is pregnant, most of the blood of the mother is directed to the placenta to provide the baby with the required nutrition; other maternal organs may in consequence be vulnerable to damage. These organs include the liver (...) , the spleen, and the kidneys. The general effects of Chinese herbal medicines that can protect these organs may be valuable in pre-eclampsia by encouraging vasodilatation, increasing blood flow, and decreasing platelet aggregation. The use of Chinese herbal medicine is often based on the individual and presence of traditional Chinese medicine symptoms.To assess the effect of Chinese herbal medicine for treating pre-eclampsia and compare it with that of placebo, no treatment or Western medicine.We searched

2006 Cochrane

128. Rest during pregnancy for preventing pre-eclampsia and its complications in women with normal blood pressure. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Rest during pregnancy for preventing pre-eclampsia and its complications in women with normal blood pressure. Women at risk of pre-eclampsia or gestational hypertension are sometimes advised to rest. Whether this, overall, does more good than harm is unclear.To assess the effects of rest or advice to reduce physical activity during pregnancy for preventing pre-eclampsia and its complications in women with normal blood pressure.We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group Trials (...) Register (December 2005), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, Issue 3, 2005), and EMBASE (2002 to August 2005).Studies were included if they were randomised trials evaluating the effects of rest or advise to reduce physical activity for preventing pre-eclampsia and its complications in women with normal blood pressure.Two review authors independently selected trials for inclusion and extracted data. Data were double checked for accuracy.Two small trials (106 women

2006 Cochrane

129. Exercise or other physical activity for preventing pre-eclampsia and its complications. (Abstract)

Exercise or other physical activity for preventing pre-eclampsia and its complications. The association between an increase in regular physical activity and a reduction in the risk of hypertension is well documented for non-pregnant people. It has been suggested that exercise may help prevent pre-eclampsia and its complications. Possible adverse effects of increased physical activity during pregnancy, particularly on the risk of preterm birth and fetal growth restriction, are unclear (...) . It is, therefore, important to assess whether exercise reduces the risk of pre-eclampsia and its complications and, if so, whether these benefits outweigh the risks.To assess the effects of exercise, or increased physical activity, on prevention of pre-eclampsia and its complications.We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group Trials Register (December 2005), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library 2005, Issue 1), and EMBASE (2002 to February 2005).Studies were

2006 Cochrane

130. Review: antiplatelet agents (particularly aspirin) reduce the incidence of pre-eclampsia in women at risk Full Text available with Trip Pro

Review: antiplatelet agents (particularly aspirin) reduce the incidence of pre-eclampsia in women at risk Review: antiplatelet agents (particularly aspirin) reduce the incidence of pre-eclampsia in women at risk | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password (...) For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: antiplatelet agents (particularly aspirin) reduce the incidence of pre-eclampsia in women at risk Article Text Therapeutics Review: antiplatelet agents (particularly

2006 Evidence-Based Medicine

131. Vitamins C and E and the risks of preeclampsia and perinatal complications. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Vitamins C and E and the risks of preeclampsia and perinatal complications. Supplementation with antioxidant vitamins has been proposed to reduce the risk of preeclampsia and perinatal complications, but the effects of this intervention are uncertain.We conducted a multicenter, randomized trial of nulliparous women between 14 and 22 weeks of gestation. Women were assigned to daily supplementation with 1000 mg of vitamin C and 400 IU of vitamin E or placebo (microcrystalline cellulose) until (...) delivery. Primary outcomes were the risks of maternal preeclampsia, death or serious outcomes in the infants (on the basis of definitions used by the Australian and New Zealand Neonatal Network), and delivering an infant whose birth weight was below the 10th percentile for gestational age.Of the 1877 women enrolled in the study, 935 were randomly assigned to the vitamin group and 942 to the placebo group. Baseline characteristics of the two groups were similar. There were no significant differences

2006 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high

132. Vitamin C and vitamin E in pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia (VIP trial): randomised placebo-controlled trial. (Abstract)

Vitamin C and vitamin E in pregnant women at risk for pre-eclampsia (VIP trial): randomised placebo-controlled trial. Oxidative stress could play a part in pre-eclampsia, and there is some evidence to suggest that vitamin C and vitamin E supplements could reduce the risk of the disorder. Our aim was to investigate the potential benefit of these antioxidants in a cohort of women with a range of clinical risk factors.We did a randomised, placebo-controlled trial to which we enrolled 2410 women (...) identified as at increased risk of pre-eclampsia from 25 hospitals. We assigned the women 1000 mg vitamin C and 400 IU vitamin E (RRR alpha tocopherol; n=1199) or matched placebo (n=1205) daily from the second trimester of pregnancy until delivery. Our primary endpoint was pre-eclampsia, and our main secondary endpoints were low birthweight (<2.5 kg) and small size for gestational age (<5th customised birthweight centile). Analyses were by intention to treat. This study is registered as an International

2006 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high

133. Cost-effectiveness of prophylactic magnesium sulphate for 9996 women with pre-eclampsia from 33 countries: economic evaluation of the Magpie Trial

Cost-effectiveness of prophylactic magnesium sulphate for 9996 women with pre-eclampsia from 33 countries: economic evaluation of the Magpie Trial Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2006 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

134. Serum levels of activin A and inhibin A are not related to the increased susceptibility to pre-eclampsia in type I diabetic pregnancies (Abstract)

Serum levels of activin A and inhibin A are not related to the increased susceptibility to pre-eclampsia in type I diabetic pregnancies BACKGROUND: Activin A and inhibin A have been found to be elevated in women without diabetes subsequently developing pre-eclampsia. The aim was to investigate whether activin A and inhibin A in serum were elevated in type I diabetic women after developing pre-eclampsia and, if so, were they clinically useful as predictors of pre-eclampsia. METHODS (...) : In a prospective study, maternal serum was analyzed for activin A and inhibin A in 115 women with type 1 diabetes at 10, 14, 22, 28, and 33 weeks of gestation. RESULTS: Fourteen women (12%) developed pre-eclampsia (26-37 weeks of gestation) and 101 did not. The two groups were comparable regarding age, body mass index, and diabetes duration. There was no difference between serum concentrations of activin A and inhibin A in women developing pre-eclampsia and women who did not at any gestational period

2006 EvidenceUpdates

135. Altered dietary salt for preventing pre-eclampsia, and its complications. (Abstract)

Altered dietary salt for preventing pre-eclampsia, and its complications. In the past, women have been advised that lowering their salt intake might reduce their risk of developing pre-eclampsia. Although this practice has largely ceased, it remains important to assess the evidence about possible effects of altered dietary salt intake during pregnancy.The objective of this review was to assess the effects of altered dietary salt during pregnancy on the risk of developing pre-eclampsia and its (...) , with 603 women. Both compared advice to reduce dietary salt intake with advice to continue a normal diet. The confidence intervals were wide and crossed the no-effect line for all the reported outcomes, including pre-eclampsia (relative risk 1.11, 95% confidence interval 0.46 to 2.66). In other words, there was insufficient evidence for reliable conclusions about the effects of advice to reduce dietary salt.In the absence of evidence that advice to alter salt intake during pregnancy has any beneficial

2005 Cochrane

136. Recurrence of pre-eclampsia across generations: exploring fetal and maternal genetic components in a population based cohort. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Recurrence of pre-eclampsia across generations: exploring fetal and maternal genetic components in a population based cohort. To assess the impact on risk of pre-eclampsia of genes that work through the mother, and genes of paternal origin that work through the fetus.Population based cohort study.Registry data from Norway.Linked generational data from the medical birth registry of Norway (1967-2003): 438,597 mother-offspring units and 286,945 father-offspring units.Pre-eclampsia in the second (...) generation.The daughters of women who had pre-eclampsia during pregnancy had more than twice the risk of pre-eclampsia themselves (odds ratio 2.2, 95% confidence interval 2.0 to 2.4) compared with other women. Men born after a pregnancy complicated by pre-eclampsia had a moderately increased risk of fathering a pre-eclamptic pregnancy (1.5, 1.3 to 1.7). Sisters of affected men or women, who were themselves born after pregnancies not complicated by pre-eclampsia, also had an increased risk (2.0, 1.7 to 2.3

2005 BMJ

137. Urinary placental growth factor and risk of preeclampsia. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Urinary placental growth factor and risk of preeclampsia. Preeclampsia may be caused by an imbalance of angiogenic factors. We previously demonstrated that high serum levels of soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase 1 (sFlt1), an antiangiogenic protein, and low levels of placental growth factor (PlGF), a proangiogenic protein, predict subsequent development of preeclampsia. In the absence of glomerular disease leading to proteinuria, sFlt1 is too large a molecule to be filtered into the urine, while (...) PlGF is readily filtered.To test the hypothesis that urinary PlGF is reduced prior to onset of hypertension and proteinuria and that this reduction predicts preeclampsia.Nested case-control study within the Calcium for Preeclampsia Prevention trial of healthy nulliparous women enrolled at 5 US university medical centers during 1992-1995. Each woman with preeclampsia was matched to 1 normotensive control by enrollment site, gestational age at collection of the first serum specimen, and sample

2005 JAMA

138. Prevention of preeclampsia with low-dose aspirin: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the main randomized controlled trials

Prevention of preeclampsia with low-dose aspirin: a systematic review and meta-analysis of the main randomized controlled trials Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2005 DARE.

139. Pre-eclampsia. (Abstract)

Pre-eclampsia. Pre-eclampsia is a major cause of maternal mortality (15-20% in developed countries) and morbidities (acute and long-term), perinatal deaths, preterm birth, and intrauterine growth restriction. Key findings support a causal or pathogenetic model of superficial placentation driven by immune maladaptation, with subsequently reduced concentrations of angiogenic growth factors and increased placental debris in the maternal circulation resulting in a (mainly hypertensive) maternal (...) inflammatory response. The final phenotype, maternal pre-eclamptic syndrome, is further modulated by pre-existing maternal cardiovascular or metabolic fitness. Currently, women at risk are identified on the basis of epidemiological and clinical risk factors, but the diagnostic criteria of pre-eclampsia remain unclear, with no known biomarkers. Treatment is still prenatal care, timely diagnosis, proper management, and timely delivery. Many interventions to lengthen pregnancy (eg, treatment for mild

2005 Lancet

140. Cancer after pre-eclampsia: follow up of the Jerusalem perinatal study cohort. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cancer after pre-eclampsia: follow up of the Jerusalem perinatal study cohort. To compare the incidence of cancer among women with and without a history of pre-eclampsia.Cohort study.Jerusalem perinatal study of women who delivered in three large hospitals in West Jerusalem during 1964-76.37 033 women.Age adjusted and multivariable adjusted hazard ratios for cancer incidence for the entire cohort and for women who were primiparous at study entry.Cancer developed in 91 women who had pre (...) -eclampsia and 2204 who did not (hazard ratio 1.27, 95% confidence interval 1.03 to 1.57). The risk of site specific cancers was increased, particularly of the stomach, ovary epithelium, breast, and lung or larynx. The incidence of cancer of the stomach, breast, ovary, kidney, and lung or larynx was increased in primiparous women at study entry who had a history pre-eclampsia.A history of pre-eclampsia is associated with increases in overall risk of cancer and incidence at several sites. This may

2004 BMJ