Latest & greatest articles for preeclampsia

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Top results for preeclampsia

161. Trial of calcium to prevent preeclampsia. (Abstract)

Trial of calcium to prevent preeclampsia. Previous trials have suggested that calcium supplementation during pregnancy may reduce the risk of preeclampsia. However, differences in study design and a low dietary calcium intake in the populations studied limit acceptance of the data.We randomly assigned 4589 healthy nulliparous women who were 13 to 21 weeks pregnant to receive daily treatment with either 2 g of elemental calcium or placebo for the remainder of their pregnancies. Surveillance (...) for preeclampsia was conducted by personnel unaware of treatment-group assignments, using standardized measurements of blood pressure and urinary protein excretion at uniformly scheduled prenatal visits, protocols for monitoring these measurements during the hospitalization for delivery, and reviews of medical records of unscheduled outpatient visits and all hospitalizations.Calcium supplementation did not significantly reduce the incidence or severity of preeclampsia or delay its onset. Preeclampsia occurred

1997 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high

162. Magnesium sulphate in the treatment of eclampsia and pre-eclampsia: an overview of the evidence from randomised trials

Magnesium sulphate in the treatment of eclampsia and pre-eclampsia: an overview of the evidence from randomised trials Magnesium sulphate in the treatment of eclampsia and pre-eclampsia: an overview of the evidence from randomised trials Magnesium sulphate in the treatment of eclampsia and pre-eclampsia: an overview of the evidence from randomised trials Chien P F, Khan K S, Arnott N Authors' objectives To evaluate the effectiveness of magnesium sulphate in the treatment of eclampsia and pre (...) selection Study designs of evaluations included in the review Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were included if they fulfilled the following criteria: target population was women with eclampsia or pre-eclampsia, magnesium sulphate was compared with some other form of treatment, and seizure activity was used as the primary outcome measure. Specific interventions included in the review The interventions studied included intravenous and intramuscular magnesium sulphate, intravenous phenytoin

1996 DARE.

163. Effect of calcium supplementation on pregnancy-induced hypertension and preeclampsia: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

To review the effect of calcium supplementation during pregnancy on blood-pressure, pre-eclampsia and adverse outcomes of pregnancy. Searching MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched from 1966 to 1994 using the Cochrane Collaboration strategy and the keywords 'calcium' and 'hypertension' or 'blood pressure'. Citation searches of frequently identified articles were performed on SciSearch. Authors of eligible trials were contacted to ensure accuracy, completeness of data, and to identify unpublished trials (...) . Studies published in any language were considered. Full details are presented in the companion review (see Other Publications of Related Interest no.1). Study selection Study designs of evaluations included in the review Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were included. Specific interventions included in the review Calcium supplementation. Participants included in the review Pregnant women (normotensive and hypertensive women, and women at risk of pre-eclampsia) were included. Outcomes assessed

1996 DARE.

164. CLASP: a randomised trial of low-dose aspirin for the prevention and treatment of pre-eclampsia among 9364 pregnant women. CLASP (Collaborative Low-dose Aspirin Study in Pregnancy) Collaborative Group. (Abstract)

CLASP: a randomised trial of low-dose aspirin for the prevention and treatment of pre-eclampsia among 9364 pregnant women. CLASP (Collaborative Low-dose Aspirin Study in Pregnancy) Collaborative Group. Pre-eclampsia is a common and serious complication of pregnancy that affects both mother and child. Review of previous small trials of antiplatelet therapy, particularly low-dose aspirin, suggested reductions of about three-quarters in the incidence of pre-eclampsia and some avoidance (...) of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR), but larger trials have not confirmed these results. In our multicentre study 9364 women were randomly assigned 60 mg aspirin daily or matching placebo. 74% were entered for prophylaxis of pre-eclampsia, 12% for prophylaxis of IUGR, 12% for treatment of pre-eclampsia, and 3% for treatment of IUGR. Overall, the use of aspirin was associated with a reduction of only 12% in the incidence of proteinuric pre-eclampsia, which was not significant. Nor was there any

1994 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

165. Prevention of preeclampsia with low-dose aspirin in healthy, nulliparous pregnant women. The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Network of Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units. (Abstract)

Prevention of preeclampsia with low-dose aspirin in healthy, nulliparous pregnant women. The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Network of Maternal-Fetal Medicine Units. Although low-dose aspirin has been reported to reduce the incidence of preeclampsia among women at high risk for this complication, its efficacy and safety in healthy, nulliparous pregnant women are not known.We studied 3135 normotensive nulliparous women who were 13 to 26 weeks pregnant to determine (...) whether treatment with aspirin reduced the incidence of preeclampsia. Of this group, 1570 women received 60 mg of aspirin per day and 1565 received placebo for the remainder of their pregnancies. We also evaluated the effect of aspirin on maternal and neonatal morbidity.Of the original group of 3135 women, 2985 (95 percent) were followed throughout pregnancy and the immediate puerperium. The incidence of preeclampsia was lower in the aspirin group (69 of 1485 women [4.6 percent]) than in the placebo

1993 NEJM Controlled trial quality: uncertain

166. [Prevention of intrauterine growth retardation and pre-eclampsia by small doses of aspirin. Results of the french multicenter trial EPREDA and comparison with data in the literature; value of uterine Doppler]. (Abstract)

[Prevention of intrauterine growth retardation and pre-eclampsia by small doses of aspirin. Results of the french multicenter trial EPREDA and comparison with data in the literature; value of uterine Doppler]. 1351078 1992 07 16 2018 11 30 0368-2315 21 3 1992 Journal de gynecologie, obstetrique et biologie de la reproduction J Gynecol Obstet Biol Reprod (Paris) [Prevention of intrauterine growth retardation and pre-eclampsia by small doses of aspirin. Results of the french multicenter trial (...) Biol Reprod (Paris) 0322206 0150-9918 64ALC7F90C Dipyridamole R16CO5Y76E Aspirin IM Aspirin administration & dosage therapeutic use Dipyridamole administration & dosage therapeutic use Double-Blind Method Drug Therapy, Combination Female Fetal Growth Retardation diagnostic imaging drug therapy prevention & control Humans Pre-Eclampsia diagnostic imaging drug therapy prevention & control Pregnancy Prospective Studies Ultrasonography, Prenatal standards 1992 1 1 1992 1 1 0 1 1992 1 1 0 0 ppublish

1992 Journal de gynecologie, obstetrique et biologie de la reproduction Controlled trial quality: uncertain

167. Low-dose aspirin prevents pregnancy-induced hypertension and pre-eclampsia in angiotensin-sensitive primigravidae. (Abstract)

Low-dose aspirin prevents pregnancy-induced hypertension and pre-eclampsia in angiotensin-sensitive primigravidae. The possibility of preventing pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and pre-eclampsia in primigravidae by suppressing production of thromboxane A2 with low-dose aspirin was investigated in a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. 46 normotensive women at 28 weeks' gestation, judged to be at risk of PIH or pre-eclampsia because of an increased blood-pressure response (...) to intravenously infused angiotensin II, were studied. 23 women received 60 mg aspirin daily, and the same number received matching placebo until delivery. In the placebo group PIH, pre-eclampsia, and eclampsia developed in 4, 7, and 1 cases, respectively, whereas only 2 women in the aspirin group had mild PIH. There were no adverse effects of treatment in mothers or infants. Low-dose aspirin may restore prostacyclin/thromboxane imbalance, previously suggested as an important aetiological factor in PIH and pre

1986 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain

168. Prevention of pre-eclampsia by early antiplatelet therapy. (Abstract)

Prevention of pre-eclampsia by early antiplatelet therapy. 102 patients at high risk of pre-eclampsia and/or fetal growth retardation were randomly allocated to treatment with 300 mg dipyridamole and 150 mg aspirin daily from 3 months' gestation onwards (group A) or to the control group (group B, no treatment). Group A was twice as likely as group B to have a normal pregnancy. Pre-eclampsia occurred in 6 patients in group B and none in group A. Major complications (fetal death or severe growth (...) retardation) occurred in 9 patients in group B and none in group A. Platelet count and plasma volume were significantly higher in group A than in group B throughout pregnancy. The treatment did not produce serious adverse effects. Antiplatelet therapy given early in pregnancy to high-risk patients may thus protect against pre-eclampsia and fetal growth retardation.

1985 Lancet Controlled trial quality: uncertain