Latest & greatest articles for pregnancy

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Top results for pregnancy

101. Pregnancy and Heart Disease

Pregnancy and Heart Disease Sign In (ACOG) Sign in to your ACOG account Email is required. Please enter valid Email. was not found in our system. Would you like to associated with your account? Forgot your email address? JSOG Member? © 2019 - American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

102. Critical Care in Pregnancy

Critical Care in Pregnancy Sign In (ACOG) Sign in to your ACOG account Email is required. Please enter valid Email. was not found in our system. Would you like to associated with your account? Forgot your email address? JSOG Member? © 2019 - American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

103. Slow-release vaginal insert of misoprostol versus orally administrated solution of misoprostol for the induction of labour in primiparous term pregnant women: a randomised controlled trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Slow-release vaginal insert of misoprostol versus orally administrated solution of misoprostol for the induction of labour in primiparous term pregnant women: a randomised controlled trial To compare the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended orally administrated dosage of misoprostol (25 μg) with a vaginal slow-release (7 μg/hour) insert of misoprostol regarding time from induction to delivery and safety of the method.Open label, Randomised controlled trial (RCT).Delivery ward

2019 EvidenceUpdates

104. Methylphenidate (Ritalin and other brands) during pregnancy: teratogenic and fetotoxic, with concerns about long-term effects

, including a total of about 3500 pregnant women exposed to methylphenidate during the first trimester of pregnancy, have shown that the risk of cardiac malformations is probably greater in children of exposed mothers compared to those of non-exposed mothers: around 3 additional cases per 1000 pregnancies. When exposure to methylphenidate occurred during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, the risk of preeclampsia and premature birth seemed to be greater than in the absence of exposure. At birth (...) Methylphenidate (Ritalin and other brands) during pregnancy: teratogenic and fetotoxic, with concerns about long-term effects Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Methylphenidate (Ritalin° and other brands) during pregnancy: teratogenic and fetotoxic, with concerns about long-term effects'', 1 June 2019 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Methylphenidate (Ritalin° and other brands) during pregnancy: teratogenic and fetotoxic, with concerns about long-term effects Spotlight Every month, the subjects

2019 Prescrire

105. Techniques of monitoring blood glucose during pregnancy for women with pre-existing diabetes. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Techniques of monitoring blood glucose during pregnancy for women with pre-existing diabetes. There are a number of ways of monitoring blood glucose in women with diabetes during pregnancy, with self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) recommended as a key component of the management plan. No existing systematic reviews consider the benefits/effectiveness of different techniques of blood glucose monitoring on maternal and infant outcomes among pregnant women with pre-existing diabetes (...) . The effectiveness of the various monitoring techniques is unclear. This review is an update of a review that was first published in 2014 and subsequently updated in 2017.To compare techniques of blood glucose monitoring and their impact on maternal and infant outcomes among pregnant women with pre-existing diabetes.For this update, we searched Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth's Trials Register, ClinicalTrials.gov, the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (1 November 2018), and reference

2019 Cochrane

106. Management of Preexisting Diabetes in Pregnancy: A Review. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Management of Preexisting Diabetes in Pregnancy: A Review. The presence of preexisting type 1 or type 2 diabetes in pregnancy increases the risk of adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes, such as preeclampsia, cesarean delivery, preterm delivery, macrosomia, and congenital defects. Approximately 0.9% of the 4 million births in the United States annually are complicated by preexisting diabetes.Women with diabetes have increased risk for adverse maternal and neonatal outcomes, and similar risks (...) are present with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Both forms of diabetes require similar intensity of diabetes care. Preconception planning is very important to avoid unintended pregnancies and to minimize risk of congenital defects. Hemoglobin A1c goals are less than 6.5% at conception and less than 6.0% during pregnancy. It is also critical to screen for and manage comorbid illnesses, such as retinopathy and nephropathy. Medications known to be unsafe in pregnancy, such as angiotensin-converting enzyme

2019 JAMA

107. A Randomized Trial of Progesterone in Women with Bleeding in Early Pregnancy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

A Randomized Trial of Progesterone in Women with Bleeding in Early Pregnancy. Bleeding in early pregnancy is strongly associated with pregnancy loss. Progesterone is essential for the maintenance of pregnancy. Several small trials have suggested that progesterone therapy may improve pregnancy outcomes in women who have bleeding in early pregnancy.We conducted a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate progesterone, as compared with placebo, in women (...) with vaginal bleeding in early pregnancy. Women were randomly assigned to receive vaginal suppositories containing either 400 mg of progesterone or matching placebo twice daily, from the time at which they presented with bleeding through 16 weeks of gestation. The primary outcome was the birth of a live-born baby after at least 34 weeks of gestation. The primary analysis was performed in all participants for whom data on the primary outcome were available. A sensitivity analysis of the primary outcome

2019 NEJM Controlled trial quality: predicted high

108. Glucose screening in pregnancy and future risk of cardiovascular disease in women: a retrospective, population-based cohort study (Abstract)

Glucose screening in pregnancy and future risk of cardiovascular disease in women: a retrospective, population-based cohort study In studies to date, gestational diabetes has consistently been associated with an increased future risk of cardiovascular disease, irrespective of the antepartum screening protocol or diagnostic criteria by which gestational diabetes is diagnosed. We reasoned that the resultant heterogeneity in the severity of dysglycaemia in women with gestational diabetes suggests (...) that the relationship between gestational glycaemia and subsequent cardiovascular disease probably extends into the non-diagnostic range. Thus, we hypothesised that glucose screening in pregnancy would identify future risk of cardiovascular disease in women who did not have gestational diabetes.We did a population-based cohort study using information from health-care administrative databases from the Ministry of Health and Long Term Care of Ontario (Canada). We identified all women in Ontario who had a 50 g oral

2019 EvidenceUpdates

109. Doxylamine succinate and pyridoxine hydrochloride (Xonvea) for the treatment of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy in women who do not respond to conservative management

Doxylamine succinate and pyridoxine hydrochloride (Xonvea) for the treatment of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy in women who do not respond to conservative management 1 Published 13 May 2019 1 SMC2140 doxylamine succinate 10mg and pyridoxine hydrochloride 10mg gastro-resistant tablets (Xonvea®) Alliance Pharmaceuticals Limited 5 April 2019 The Scottish Medicines Consortium (SMC) has completed its assessment of the above product and advises NHS Boards and Area Drug and Therapeutic Committees (...) (ADTCs) on its use in NHSScotland. The advice is summarised as follows: ADVICE: following a full submission doxylamine succinate and pyridoxine hydrochloride (Xonvea®) is not recommended for use within NHSScotland. Indication under review: the treatment of nausea and vomiting of pregnancy in women who do not respond to conservative management. Doxylamine in combination with pyridoxine significantly improved symptoms of nausea and vomiting compared with placebo in women with nausea and vomiting

2019 Scottish Medicines Consortium

110. Magnesium sulfate: risk of skeletal adverse effects in the neonate following prolonged or repeated use in pregnancy

Magnesium sulfate: risk of skeletal adverse effects in the neonate following prolonged or repeated use in pregnancy Magnesium sulfate: risk of skeletal adverse effects in the neonate following prolonged or repeated use in pregnancy - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. or Search Magnesium sulfate: risk of skeletal adverse effects in the neonate following prolonged or repeated use in pregnancy Maternal administration of magnesium sulfate for longer than 5–7 days in pregnancy has (...) been associated with skeletal adverse effects and hypocalcaemia and hypermagnesemia in neonates. If use of magnesium sulfate in pregnancy is prolonged or repeated, consider monitoring of neonates for abnormal calcium and magnesium levels and skeletal adverse effects. Published 17 May 2019 From: Therapeutic area: , , , Contents Advice for healthcare professionals: maternal administration of magnesium sulfate for longer than 5–7 days in pregnancy may be associated with adverse effects in the foetus

2019 MHRA Drug Safety Update

111. BHIVA guidelines on the management of HIV in pregnancy and postpartum

writing group 2 1. Scope and purpose 7 1.1 Guideline development process 7 1.2 Patient involvement 7 1.3 Dissemination and implementation 8 1.4 Summary of guideline update and date of next review 8 2. Recommendations and auditable outcomes 9 2.1 Recommendations 9 Section 4. The psychosocial care of women living with HIV during and after pregnancy 9 Section 5. Screening and monitoring of pregnant women living with HIV 9 Section 6. Current issues on the use of ART in pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes 10 (...) living with HIV during and after pregnancy 25 4.1 Psychosocial issues around HIV and pregnancy 25 4.1.1 Social issues 25 4.1.2 Psychosocial care 26 4.1.3 The antenatal HIV MDT 26 4.1.4 The psychosocial care of women newly diagnosed with HIV during pregnancy 27 4.2 Perinatal mental health assessment 27 4.3 References 28 5. Screening and monitoring of pregnant women living with HIV 30 5.1 Sexual health screening 30 5.1.1 Herpes simplex virus 30 5.1.2 Chorioamnionitis and BV 31 5.1.3 STI screening 31

2019 British HIV Association

112. Screening for Elevated Blood Lead Levels in Children and Pregnant Women: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Screening for Elevated Blood Lead Levels in Children and Pregnant Women: US Preventive Services Task Force Recommendation Statement. Elevated blood lead levels in children are associated with neurologic effects such as behavioral and learning problems, lower IQ, hyperactivity, hearing problems, and impaired growth. In pregnant women, lead exposure can impair organ systems such as the hematopoietic, hepatic, renal, and nervous systems, and increase the risk of preeclampsia and adverse perinatal (...) outcomes. Many of the adverse health effects of lead exposure are irreversible.To update the 2006 US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendation on screening for elevated blood lead levels in children and pregnant women.The USPSTF reviewed the evidence on the benefits and harms of screening for and treatment of elevated blood lead levels. In this update, an elevated blood lead level was defined according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reference level of 5 μg/dL.The USPSTF

2019 JAMA

113. Monthly sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine versus dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy: a double-blind, randomised, controlled, superiority trial. (Abstract)

Monthly sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine versus dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine for intermittent preventive treatment of malaria in pregnancy: a double-blind, randomised, controlled, superiority trial. Intermittent treatment with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, recommended for prevention of malaria in pregnant women throughout sub-Saharan Africa, is threatened by parasite resistance. We assessed the efficacy and safety of intermittent preventive treatment with dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (...) as an alternative to sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine.We did a double-blind, randomised, controlled, superiority trial at one rural site in Uganda with high malaria transmission and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance. HIV-uninfected pregnant women between 12 and 20 weeks gestation were randomly assigned (1:1) to monthly intermittent preventive treatment during pregnancy with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine or dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine. The primary endpoint was the risk of a composite adverse birth outcome defined

2019 Lancet Controlled trial quality: predicted high

114. Thrombocytopenia in Pregnancy

Thrombocytopenia in Pregnancy Sign In (ACOG) Sign in to your ACOG account Email is required. Please enter valid Email. was not found in our system. Would you like to associated with your account? Forgot your email address? JSOG Member? © 2019 - American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

115. Nonobstetric Surgery During Pregnancy

of trimester because this can adversely affect the pregnant woman and her fetus. Elective surgery should be postponed until after delivery. Given the potential for preterm delivery with some nonobstetric procedures during pregnancy, corticosteroid administration for fetal benefit should be considered for patients with fetuses at viable premature gestational ages, and patients should be monitored in the perioperative period for signs or symptoms of preterm labor. Pregnant women undergoing nonobstetric (...) Nonobstetric Surgery During Pregnancy Nonobstetric Surgery During Pregnancy - ACOG Menu ▼ Nonobstetric Surgery During Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ INTERIM UPDATE Number 775 (Replaces Committee Opinion No. 696, April 2017) Committee on Obstetric Practice American Society of Anesthesiologists This Committee Opinion was developed by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ Committee on Obstetric Practice and the American Society of Anesthesiologists. This document reflects emerging

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

116. Ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage: diagnosis and initial management

be pregnant, and think about offering a pregnancy test even when symptoms are non-specific and and Ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage: diagnosis and initial management (NG126) © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and- conditions#notice-of-rights). Page 8 of 33the symptoms and signs of ectopic pregnancy can resemble the common symptoms and signs of other conditions – for example, gastrointestinal conditions or urinary tract infection. [2012] [2012 (...) Ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage: diagnosis and initial management Ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage: Ectopic pregnancy and miscarriage: diagnosis and initial management diagnosis and initial management NICE guideline Published: 17 April 2019 nice.org.uk/guidance/ng126 © NICE 2019. All rights reserved. Subject to Notice of rights (https://www.nice.org.uk/terms-and-conditions#notice-of- rights).Y Y our responsibility our responsibility The recommendations in this guideline represent the view

2019 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Clinical Guidelines

117. Elvitegravir boosted with cobicistat: avoid use in pregnancy due to risk of treatment failure and maternal-to-child transmission of HIV-1

identified any cases of mother to child HIV-1 transmission in women taking regimens containing elvitegravir/cobicistat during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy. However, due to the theoretical risk, therapy with elvitegravir/cobicistat should not be initiated during pregnancy and women who are pregnant and taking elvitegravir/cobicistat should be switched to an alternative regimen. Updates to product information The product information for (elvitegravir/cobicistat/emtricitabine/tenofovir (...) Elvitegravir boosted with cobicistat: avoid use in pregnancy due to risk of treatment failure and maternal-to-child transmission of HIV-1 Elvitegravir boosted with cobicistat: avoid use in pregnancy due to risk of treatment failure and maternal-to-child transmission of HIV-1 - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. or Search Elvitegravir boosted with cobicistat: avoid use in pregnancy due to risk of treatment failure and maternal-to-child transmission of HIV-1 Pharmacokinetic data

2019 MHRA Drug Safety Update

118. Medicines with teratogenic potential: what is effective contraception and how often is pregnancy testing needed?

exposures during pregnancy in a woman taking a medicine of teratogenic potential. Published 21 March 2019 From: Therapeutic area: , , Contents Background Some medicines are known or suspected to have the potential to increase the risk of birth defects and development disorders (teratogenic potential) when taken during pregnancy, especially during the first trimester (up to week 12 of pregnancy), when a woman may not know she is pregnant. The product information for these medicines advise that pregnancy (...) as ‘effective’ for use with medicines with teratogenic potential so should not be relied upon alone. Need for pregnancy testing A woman may be unaware she is pregnant at the start of treatment or be in the early stages of pregnancy at the time of repeat prescribing due to contraceptive failure. MHRA continues to receive reports of inadvertent exposure to such medicines during early pregnancy. One way to avoid inadvertent exposures is for a pregnancy test to be performed before prescription of a medicine

2019 MHRA Drug Safety Update

119. Prenatal Management of Pregnancies at Risk of Fetal Neonatal Alloimmune Thrombocytopenia (FNAIT)

in the neonate (14% before 20 weeks of gestation and a further 30% before 30 weeks of gestation). It is clear that the first pregnancy may be affected by FNAIT and that the diagnosis is made only after fetal or neonatal bleeding, or a chance finding of thrombocytopenia. The aim of screening pregnant women for FNAIT would be to detect the condition during the mother's first affected pregnancy, and to reduce the risk of ICH or intrauterine death for that baby and subsequent babies. The benefits of screening (...) prophylaxis is given to RhD‐negative pregnant women to prevent the formation of immune anti‐D antibodies during pregnancy with an RhD‐positive fetus, research is underway on a product to prevent women forming immune anti‐HPA‐1a. The PROFNAIT project is a consortium of 11 Northern European hospitals, universities, blood services and companies with expertise in FNAIT, supported by European Union funding from 2012–18, to develop an anti‐HPA‐1a immunoglobulin for prophylaxis. PROFNAIT received orphan drug

2019 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists

120. Pregnancy and lower urinary tract infection: opt for cefuroxime

antibiotics are cefuroxime and the combination of amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, because a large amount of data on short-term exposure is available. This includes around 400 pregnancies exposed from the first trimester to cefuroxime, and 500 exposed to the combination of amoxicillin + clavulanic acid, in which no problem was identified. In mid-2017, proprietary drugs based on single-dose fosfomycin trometamol were authorised in France for urinary tract infections in pregnant women, after having been (...) Pregnancy and lower urinary tract infection: opt for cefuroxime Prescrire IN ENGLISH - Spotlight ''Pregnancy and lower urinary tract infection: opt for cefuroxime'', 1 April 2019 {1} {1} {1} | | > > > Pregnancy and lower urinary tract infection: opt for cefuroxime Spotlight Every month, the subjects in Prescrire’s Spotlight. 100 most recent :  |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |   |  Spotlight Pregnancy and lower urinary tract

2019 Prescrire