Latest & greatest articles for pregnancy

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Top results for pregnancy

161. Chronic Hypertension in Pregnancy

Chronic Hypertension in Pregnancy Sign In (ACOG) Sign in to your ACOG account Email is required. Please enter valid Email. was not found in our system. Would you like to associated with your account? Forgot your email address? JSOG Member? © 2019 - American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

162. Syphilis in pregnancy

reduction · Early screening of all pregnant women, and identification of high risk pregnancies and babies can prevent adverse perinatal outcomes 15,16 Queensland Clinical Guideline: Syphilis in pregnancy Refer to online version, destroy printed copies after use Page 9 of 31 1.4 Notifiable disease Table 3. Disease notification Aspect Consideration Context · Syphilis is a controlled notifiable disease in Queensland as per the Public Health Act (2005) 19 · Routine reporting is the cornerstone of syphilis (...) reactive POC testing by laboratory serology Queensland Clinical Guideline: Syphilis in pregnancy Refer to online version, destroy printed copies after use Page 14 of 31 3.5 Risk groups and recommended screening for syphilis Table 10. Recommended screening by risk group Risk group Relevant to the following groups of pregnant women Recommended screening Universal risk · All pregnant women · Routinely at the first antenatal appointment and preferably before 10 weeks gestation 22 · Request ‘syphilis

2019 Queensland Health

163. Valproate medicines: are you in acting in compliance with the pregnancy prevention measures?

Valproate medicines: are you in acting in compliance with the pregnancy prevention measures? Valproate medicines: are you acting in compliance with the pregnancy prevention measures? - GOV.UK GOV.UK uses cookies to make the site simpler. Search Valproate medicines: are you acting in compliance with the pregnancy prevention measures? Although use of valproate medicines in female patients continues to slowly decline, there is wide variation in prescribing between Clinical Commissioning Groups (...) December 2018 From: Therapeutic area: , , , , , Contents New information Compliance by healthcare professionals with the new valproate measures for pregnancy prevention appears currently patchy Women are not always receiving Patient Information Leaflets with their medicines, as is required Some women using valproate for off-label indications are not being reviewed in line with the new pregnancy prevention measures is available for psychiatrists on the withdrawal of, and alternatives to, valproate

2019 MHRA Drug Safety Update

164. Effect of metformin in addition to dietary and lifestyle advice for pregnant women who are overweight or obese: the GRoW randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (Abstract)

Effect of metformin in addition to dietary and lifestyle advice for pregnant women who are overweight or obese: the GRoW randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial Maternal overweight and obesity are associated with well recognised pregnancy complications. Antenatal dietary and lifestyle interventions have a modest effect on gestational weight gain without affecting pregnancy outcomes. We aimed to assess the effects on maternal and infant outcomes of antenatal metformin given (...) including nausea, diarrhoea, and vomiting. Two stillbirths (placebo group) and one neonatal death (metformin group) occurred; none of the perinatal deaths were determined to be attributable to participation in the trial.For pregnant women who are overweight or obese, metformin given in addition to dietary and lifestyle advice initiated at 10-20 weeks' gestation does not improve pregnancy and birth outcomes.Australian National Health and Medical Research Council.Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

2019 EvidenceUpdates

165. Serial Third-Trimester Ultrasonography Compared With Routine Care in Uncomplicated Pregnancies: A Randomized Controlled Trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Serial Third-Trimester Ultrasonography Compared With Routine Care in Uncomplicated Pregnancies: A Randomized Controlled Trial Among uncomplicated pregnancies, serial third-trimester ultrasound examinations identified significantly more cases with a composite of fetal growth or amniotic fluid abnormalities (27%) than did routine fundal height measurements (8%).Women without complications between 24 0/7 and 30 6/7 weeks of gestation were randomized (NCT0270299) to either routine care (control arm (...) %), cesarean delivery in labor (5% vs 6%), and prespecified composite maternal morbidity (9% in both groups) and composite neonatal morbidity (1% vs 4%).Among uncomplicated pregnancies between 24 0/7 and 30 6/7 weeks of gestation, serial third-trimester ultrasound examinations were significantly more likely to identify abnormalities of fetal growth or amniotic fluid than measurements of fundal height and indicated ultrasound examination. No differences in maternal and neonatal outcomes were noted, although

2019 EvidenceUpdates

166. Hypertension in pregnancy

- Options for local implementation No QIPP indicators were found during the review of this topic. NICE quality standards NICE quality standards Women of childbearing potential with treated hypertension are given information annually about safe antihypertensive treatment during pregnancy. Pregnant women at increased risk of pre-eclampsia at the booking appointment are offered a prescription of 75–150 mg of aspirin to take daily from 12 weeks until birth. Pregnant women taking antihypertensive medication (...) have a blood pressure target of 135/85 mmHg or less. Pregnant women with severe hypertension are admitted for a full assessment, carried out by a healthcare professional trained in managing hypertension in pregnancy. Women with pre-eclampsia who have severe hypertension or are at a high risk of adverse events, or if there are any clinical concerns are admitted to hospital and monitored. Women with pre-eclampsia have a senior obstetrician involved in any decisions about the timing of birth. Women

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

167. Antenatal care - uncomplicated pregnancy

pregnancy but should avoid scuba diving and sports that may cause abdominal trauma, falls, or excessive joint stress. Working — most women can continue working during pregnancy. To allow a pregnant woman to continue working after 33 weeks, her GP or midwife must inform her employer that she may continue to do so. The law states that a women is not allowed to return to employment in the 2 weeks following childbirth. Maternity benefits — including information on entitlement to take time off work (...) for antenatal care, maternity cover, and free prescriptions. Pregnant women should be offered vaccination against: Influenza during the flu season (October to January). Whooping cough (pertussis) from week 16 of pregnancy. Have I got the right topic? Have I got the right topic? From age 18 years to 40 years (Female). This CKS topic is based on the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) guideline Antenatal care for uncomplicated pregnancies [ ] and The Pregnancy Book produced

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

168. Elevated Blood Lead Levels in Children and Pregnant Women: Screening

recommend screening in children at increased risk for lead exposure. The American Academy of Family Physicians recommends against routine screening for elevated blood lead levels in pregnant women without symptoms. The CDC and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommend targeted screening during pregnancy and lead testing in pregnant and lactating women with 1 or more risk factors for lead exposure, such as environmental or occupational exposures or pica. The US Preventive Services (...) Elevated Blood Lead Levels in Children and Pregnant Women: Screening Recommendation | United States Preventive Services Taskforce Toggle navigation Main navigation Main navigation Recommendation Pregnant persons The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for elevated blood lead levels in asymptomatic pregnant persons. I Children 5 years and younger The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient

2019 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

169. Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Pregnant Women: Screening

at the time of admission to a hospital or other delivery setting. Treatment and Interventions Interventions to prevent perinatal transmission of HBV infection include screening all pregnant women for HBV, vaccinating infants born to HBV-negative mothers within 24 hours of birth, and completing the HBV vaccination series in infants by age 18 months. For HBV-positive mothers, case management during pregnancy includes HBV DNA viral load testing and referral to specialty care for counseling and medical (...) in pregnant women is substantial. Patient Population Under Consideration This recommendation applies to all pregnant persons. Screening Tests The principal screening test for detecting maternal HBV infection is the serologic identification of HBsAg. Screening should be performed in each pregnancy, regardless of previous HBV vaccination or previous negative HBsAg test results. Screening Interval A test for HBsAg should be ordered at the first prenatal visit. Women with unknown HBsAg status or with new

2019 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

170. Management of Pregnant and Reproductive Aged Women during a Measles Outbreak

of the measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine is safe and is 97% effective at preventing measles infection . Measles Infection during Pregnancy Measles infection in pregnant women is associated with several adverse events including increased risk of hospitalization and pneumonia . Measles infection during pregnancy is also associated with significant risks to the fetus , including: Miscarriage Stillbirth Low birth weight Increased risk of preterm delivery Recommendations The University of Washington has (...) developed a including algorithms for guidance in managing high risk pregnant patients—those living in, or traveling to, areas with an active outbreak. Providers who care for pregnant women are encouraged to refer to the recommendations and algorithms in this ACOG-Supported consensus statement for additional information . Selected points from the ACOG-supported University of Washington , ACOG, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are highlighted below. Women Considering Pregnancy

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

171. Mothers’ going-to-sleep position in late pregnancy

Mothers’ going-to-sleep position in late pregnancy POSITION STATEMENT Mothers’ going-to-sleep position in late pregnancy Endorsed by: Please note: This is a position statement and should not replace local guidelines. It is intended to provide a consensus view and a current summary of available evidence in an area of uncertainty. Suggested citation: Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand and Centre of Research Excellence Stillbirth. Position statement: Mothers’ going-to-sleep position (...) in late pregnancy. Centre of Research Excellence in Stillbirth, Brisbane, Australia, September 2019. Key messages 1. Stillbirth is a serious public health problem with far reaching psychosocial and financial burden for families and society, and with little improvement in rates in Australia and New Zealand for more than two decades. 2. Better attention to modifiable risk factors may reduce the risk of late pregnancy stillbirth (=28 weeks’ gestation). 3. Supine going-to-sleep position in late pregnancy

2019 Centre of Research Excellence in Stillbirth

172. Detection and management of women with Fetal Growth Restriction in singleton pregnancies

Detection and management of women with Fetal Growth Restriction in singleton pregnancies POSITION STATEMENT Detection and management of women with Fetal Growth Restriction in singleton pregnancies Endorsed by: Please note: This is a position statement and should not replace local guidelines. It is intended to provide a consensus view and a current summary of available evidence in an area of uncertainty. Suggested citation: Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand and Centre of Research (...) Excellence Stillbirth. Position statement: detection and management of fetal growth restriction in singleton pregnancies. Centre of Research Excellence in Stillbirth. Brisbane, Australia, September 2019. Key messages ? Improving detection of Fetal Growth Restriction (FGR) is an important strategy to reduce stillbirths ? Risk assessment for FGR should be undertaken in early pregnancy and at each antenatal visit (see Figure 1). ? Where modifiable risk factors for FGR exist, provide advice and support

2019 Centre of Research Excellence in Stillbirth

173. Smoking – one of the most important things to prevent in pregnancy and beyond

the element of care: supporting women to stop smoking in pregnancy. The purpose of this statement is to summarise what is known about the risks of smoking in pregnancy and how best to help pregnant women (and their partners) stop smoking. Smoking rates in pregnancy in Australia and New Zealand About 1 in 10 pregnant women smoke in Australia, with a rate of 1 in 8 in New Zealand. In Australia, 44% of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women smoke in pregnancy 1 and in New Zealand, 35% of Maori women (...) birthweight and small for gestational age babies, as well as later impairments of child growth and development, and increased risk of chronic diseases later in life. 7,8 4 Exposure to second-hand smoke, also known as “passive smoking” from any type of smoke (e.g. shisha/hookah/nargile, cigarettes, cigars, bidis, marijuana leaf), and the use of smokeless tobacco and e-cigarettes also pose serious health risks to pregnant women and children. 6,9,10 Influences on smoking in pregnancy Women who smoke

2019 Centre of Research Excellence in Stillbirth

174. Clinical practice guideline for the care of women with decreased fetal movements for women with a singleton pregnancy from 28 weeks’ gestation

Clinical practice guideline for the care of women with decreased fetal movements for women with a singleton pregnancy from 28 weeks’ gestation Clinical practice guideline for the care of women with decreased fetal movements for women with a singleton pregnancy from 28 weeks’ gestation Endorsed by: Version 2.3 September 2019 i Produced by: This is the third version of the clinical guideline produced by a multidisciplinary working group led by the Centre of Research Excellence in Stillbirth (...) Australia; Australian National Council for Stillbirth and Neonatal Death Support (SANDS); Red Nose; Women’s Healthcare Australasia; and Still Aware. Suggested citation: Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand and Centre of Research Excellence Stillbirth. Clinical practice guideline for the care of women with decreased fetal movements for women with a singleton pregnancy from 28 weeks’ gestation. Centre of Research Excellence in Stillbirth. Brisbane, Australia, September 2019. Acknowledgments: We

2019 Centre of Research Excellence in Stillbirth

175. Abdominoplasty with repair of rectus diastasis (aka rectus divarication) following pregnancy

Abdominoplasty with repair of rectus diastasis (aka rectus divarication) following pregnancy application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document

2019 Medical Services Advisory Committee

176. Mass deworming for soil?transmitted helminths and schistosomiasis among pregnant women: A systematic review and individual participant data meta?analysis Full Text available with Trip Pro

is 20% or higher among pregnant women, and (ii) anaemia is a severe public health problem, with a prevalence of 40% or higher among pregnant women, in order to reduce the worm burden of hookworm and T. trichiura infection (WHO, ). For Schistosomiasis, annual treatment with praziquantel in high risk communities (>50% prevalence) and once every 2 years in medium risk (>10% and <50% prevalence) is recommended and women can be treated with praziquantel at any stage of pregnancy and lactation (WHO (...) and environment factors. IPD meta‐analysis would explore the question of whether mass deworming during pregnancy is more effective for subgroups of women defined by characteristics such as nutrition status and infection intensity. This understanding could help develop targeted strategies to reach pregnant women with deworming and guide policy regarding mass deworming. A companion review using IPD and network meta‐analysis to explore whether the effects of different types and frequency of deworming drugs

2019 Campbell Collaboration

177. Chronic Hypertension in Pregnancy

Chronic Hypertension in Pregnancy Chronic Hypertension in Pregnancy | ACOG Clinical Guidance Journals & Publications Patient Education Topics Featured Clinical Topics Hi, Featured Clinical Topics Clinical Guidance Chronic Hypertension in Pregnancy Practice Bulletin Number 203 January 2019 Jump to Resources Share By reading this page you agree to ACOG's Terms and Conditions. and may result in significant maternal, fetal, and neonatal morbidity and mortality. The rate of maternal chronic (...) hypertension increased by 67% from 2000 to 2009, with the largest increase (87%) among African American women. This increase is largely secondary to the obesity epidemic and increasing maternal age . The trend is expected to continue. The purpose of this document is to clarify the criteria used to define and diagnose chronic hypertension before or during pregnancy, to review the effects of chronic hypertension on pregnancy and vice versa, and to appraise the available evidence for management options

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

178. Thrombocytopenia in Pregnancy

Thrombocytopenia in Pregnancy Thrombocytopenia in Pregnancy | ACOG Clinical Guidance Journals & Publications Patient Education Topics Featured Clinical Topics Hi, Featured Clinical Topics Clinical Guidance Thrombocytopenia in Pregnancy Practice Bulletin Number 207 March 2019 Jump to Resources Share By reading this page you agree to ACOG's Terms and Conditions. . Although most U.S. health care providers are trained using U.S. Conventional Units, most scientists, journals, and countries use (...) Système International (SI) units. The laboratory results reported in U.S. Conventional Units can be converted to SI Units or vice versa by using a conversion factor. Given the conversion factor is 1.0, when converting from 10 3 /μL to 10 9 /L the platelet “count” does not seemingly change. Thrombocytopenia, defined as a platelet count of less than 150 × 10 9 /L, is common and occurs in 7–12% of pregnancies at the time of delivery . Thrombocytopenia can result from a variety of physiologic

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

179. Pregnancy and Heart Disease

during the puerperium. The purpose of this document is to 1) describe the prevalence and effect of heart disease among pregnant and postpartum women; 2) provide guidance for early antepartum and postpartum risk factor identification and modification; 3) outline common cardiovascular disorders that cause morbidity and mortality during pregnancy and the puerperium; 4) describe recommendations for care for pregnant and postpartum women with preexisting or new-onset acquired heart disease; and 5) present (...) * Table 2. How to Differentiate Common Signs and Symptoms of Normal Pregnancy Versus Those That Are Abnormal and Indicative of Underlying Cardiac Disease Table 3. Modified World Health Organization Pregnancy Risk Classification for Women With Preexisting Cardiovascular Disease Table 4. The Pregnancy Heart Team Table 5. Cardiac Medications With Potential Pregnancy and Lactation Influence Table 6. Management Strategies in Pregnant Women With Aortopathy Table 7. Obstetric Medications With Cardiac

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

180. Critical Care in Pregnancy

Critical Care in Pregnancy Critical Care in Pregnancy | ACOG Clinical Guidance Journals & Publications Patient Education Topics Featured Clinical Topics Hi, Featured Clinical Topics Clinical Guidance Critical Care in Pregnancy Practice Bulletin Number 211 May 2019 Jump to Resources Share By reading this page you agree to ACOG's Terms and Conditions. Nonmembers: Subscribe now to access exclusive ACOG Clinical content, including: ACOG Clinical is designed for easy and convenient access (...) and clinical management issues. Note for Life Fellows: Annual membership dues are waived but there is a discounted annual subscription fee of $95 for access to publications such as the Green Journal, Practice Bulletins, and Committee Opinions. Individual subscriptions include print and online access. . Jump to: Figures & Tables Table 1. Physiologic Changes of Pregnancy That Affect Resuscitation Table 2. Arterial Blood Gas Changes in Pregnancy (Sea Level) ACOG Family of Sites ACOG Family of Sites American

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists