Latest & greatest articles for prostate cancer

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Top results for prostate cancer

781. Docetaxel for the treatment of hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer

-refractory metastatic prostate cancer only if their Karnofsky performance-status score is 60% or more. 1.2 It is recommended that treatment with docetaxel should be stopped: - at the completion of planned treatment of up to 10 cycles, or - if severe adverse events occur, or - in the presence of progression of disease as evidenced by clinical or laboratory criteria, or by imaging studies. 1.3 Repeat cycles of treatment with docetaxel are not recommended if the disease recurs after completion (...) Docetaxel for the treatment of hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer Docetaxel for the treatment of hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer Docetaxel for the treatment of hormone-refractory metastatic prostate cancer National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation National Institute for Health

2006 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

782. Proton beam therapy for prostate cancer

Proton beam therapy for prostate cancer Proton beam therapy for prostate cancer Proton beam therapy for prostate cancer HAYES, Inc. Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation HAYES, Inc.. Proton beam therapy for prostate cancer. Lansdale: HAYES, Inc.. Directory Publication. 2006 Authors' objectives Proton beam therapy (PBT) is a type of external radiation (...) treatment in which positively charged subatomic particles (protons) are precisely targeted to a specific tissue mass by using a sophisticated stereotaxic planning and delivery system. In comparison with conventional photon irradiation, proton beam radiation may deliver a higher dose to the target tissue, while minimizing exposure to surrounding healthy tissue. Final publication URL The report may be purchased from: Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Neutrons; Prostatic Neoplasms

2006 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

783. Neutron beam therapy for prostate cancer

Neutron beam therapy for prostate cancer Neutron beam therapy for prostate cancer Neutron beam therapy for prostate cancer HAYES, Inc. Citation HAYES, Inc.. Neutron beam therapy for prostate cancer. Lansdale: HAYES, Inc.. Directory Publication. 2006 Authors' objectives Neutron beam therapy (NBT) is a form of external beam radiotherapy in which accelerated neutral subatomic particles (neutrons) are targeted to a tumor mass, with the goal of eradicating malignant cells. Unlike standard photon (x (...) -ray) radiotherapy (XRT), which is characterized by low linear energy transfer (LET), NBT involves high-LET. Compared with XRT, the high-LET of NBT is associated with greater cell killing per unit dose and, theoretically, is superior in overcoming radioresistance in slowly proliferating tumors such as prostate adenocarcinoma. Final publication URL The report may be purchased from: Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Neutrons; Prostatic Neoplasms /radiotherapy; Radiotherapy

2006 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

784. High dose rate brachytherapy in combination with external-beam radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer

High dose rate brachytherapy in combination with external-beam radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer High dose rate brachytherapy in combination with external-beam radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer High dose rate brachytherapy in combination with external-beam radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality (...) of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence. High dose rate brachytherapy in combination with external-beam radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer. London: National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE). Interventional Procedure Guidance 174. 2006 Authors' objectives This study aims to assess the current evidence on high dose rate brachytherapy in combination with external-beam radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer

2006 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

785. Brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer: assessment report May 2005

Brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer: assessment report May 2005 Brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer: assessment report May 2005 Brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer: assessment report May 2005 Medical Services Advisory Committee Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Medical Services (...) Advisory Committee. Brachytherapy for the treatment of prostate cancer: assessment report May 2005. Canberra: Medical Services Advisory Committee (MSAC). MSAC application no. 1089. 2006 Authors' objectives The aim of this report was to assess the safety, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of brachytherapy for treating early localised prostate cancer compared with radical prostatectomy (RP), external beam radiation therapy (EBRT), and no initial treatment or deferred treatment (active surveillance

2006 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

786. The cost of prostate cancer chemoprevention: a decision analysis model

of prostate cancer (PC) in men aged 55 years and older, but it was not cost-effective except in scenarios with substantial reductions in the cost of the agent and in high-risk men. In effect, given the low prevalence of disease, a substantial proportion of the cost would be generated by giving finasteride to men who, even without chemoprevention, would never develop PC. CRD COMMENTARY - Selection of comparators The rationale for the choice of the comparators was clear since the actual pattern of care (...) The cost of prostate cancer chemoprevention: a decision analysis model The cost of prostate cancer chemoprevention: a decision analysis model The cost of prostate cancer chemoprevention: a decision analysis model Svatek R S, Lee J J, Roehrborn C G, Lippman S M, Lotan Y Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed

2006 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

787. Using decision analysis to determine the cost-effectiveness of intensity-modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of intermediate risk prostate cancer

of the analysis cannot be extrapolated to the treatment of men with good-risk prostate cancer since epidemiological data referred to patients with intermediate-risk disease. Implications of the study The study results support the use of IMRT for the treatment of intermediate-risk prostate cancer, although this conclusion was highly dependent on the time horizon of the analysis and the improvements in QoL associated with treatment. The authors noted that further studies should investigate the potential (...) of increased second malignancies with IMRT. Source of funding None stated. Bibliographic details Konski A, Watkins-Bruner D, Feigenberg S, Hanlon A, Kulkarni S, Beck J R, Horwitz E M, Pollack A. Using decision analysis to determine the cost-effectiveness of intensity-modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of intermediate risk prostate cancer. International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics 2006; 66(2): 408-415 Other publications of related interest Because readers are likely

2006 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

788. Long-term hormone therapy and radiation is cost-effective for patients with locally advanced prostate carcinoma Full Text available with Trip Pro

prostate cancer. Health Econ 2002;11:233-48. Sanguineti G, Agostinelli S, Foppiano F, et al. Adjuvant androgen deprivation impacts late rectal toxicity after conformal radiotherapy of prostate carcinoma. Br J Cancer 2002;86:1843-7. Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by NLM MeSH Adenocarcinoma /drug therapy /economics /radiotherapy; Androgen Antagonists /economics /therapeutic use; Antineoplastic Agents, Hormonal /economics /therapeutic use; Combined Modality Therapy; Cost-Benefit Analysis (...) . Modelling A Markov model was set up to assess the costs and benefits of LTAD versus STAD in a cohort of patients with locally advanced prostate carcinoma. The time horizon of the model was 10 years and the cycle length was 1 year. The health states considered in the model were no disease progression, hormone-responsive disease progression, hormone-unresponsive disease progression and death. The allowable state transitions were from no disease progression, to hormone-responsive disease progression

2006 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

789. Autoantibody signatures in prostate cancer. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Autoantibody signatures in prostate cancer. New biomarkers, such as autoantibody signatures, may improve the early detection of prostate cancer.With a phage-display library derived from prostate-cancer tissue, we developed and used phage protein microarrays to analyze serum samples from 119 patients with prostate cancer and 138 controls, with the samples equally divided into training and validation sets. A phage-peptide detector that was constructed from the training set was evaluated (...) on an independent validation set of 128 serum samples (60 from patients with prostate cancer and 68 from controls).A 22-phage-peptide detector had 88.2 percent specificity (95 percent confidence interval, 0.78 to 0.95) and 81.6 percent sensitivity (95 percent confidence interval, 0.70 to 0.90) in discriminating between the group with prostate cancer and the control group. This panel of peptides performed better than did prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in distinguishing between the group with prostate cancer

2005 NEJM

790. Risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality following biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Risk of prostate cancer-specific mortality following biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy. The natural history of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy can be long but variable. Better risk assessment models are needed to identify men who are at high risk for prostate cancer death early and who may benefit from aggressive salvage treatment and to identify men who are at low risk for prostate cancer death and can be safely observed.To define risk factors for prostate (...) cancer death following radical prostatectomy and to develop tables to risk stratify for prostate cancer-specific survival.Retrospective cohort study of 379 men who had undergone radical prostatectomy at an urban tertiary care hospital between 1982 and 2000 and who had a biochemical recurrence and after biochemical failure had at least 2 prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values at least 3 months apart in order to calculate PSA doubling time (PSADT). The mean (SD) follow-up after surgery was 10.3 (4.7

2005 JAMA

791. Pretreatment PSA velocity and risk of death from prostate cancer following external beam radiation therapy. Full Text available with Trip Pro

-specific mortality for the 125 men with low-risk prostate cancer (clinical tumor category T1c or T2a and PSA level <10.0 ng/mL and Gleason score < or =6) and the 233 men with higher-risk disease, stratified by the PSA velocity.A PSA velocity greater than 2.0 ng/mL per year was significantly associated with a shorter time to prostate cancer-specific mortality (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 12.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.0-54.0; P = .001) and all-cause mortality (adjusted HR, 2.1; 95% CI, 1.3-3.6; P (...) = .005) when compared with men whose PSA velocity was 2.0 ng/mL per year or less. Men presenting with low-risk disease and a PSA velocity greater than 2.0 ng/mL per year had a 7-year estimate of prostate cancer-specific mortality of 19% (95% CI, 2%-39%) compared with 0% for men whose PSA velocity was 2.0 ng/mL per year or less. The corresponding values for men with higher-risk disease were 24% (95% CI, 12%-37%) and 4% (95% CI, 0%-11%), respectively.A greater than 2.0-ng/mL increase in PSA level

2005 JAMA

792. Androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer. Prostate cancer is the most common nonskin cancer and second most common cause of cancer mortality in US men. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), specifically surgical or medical castration, is the first line of treatment against advanced prostate cancer and is also used as an adjuvant to local treatment of high-risk disease.To review systematically the evidence on the risks and benefits of ADT for prostate cancer as well as clinical management (...) of its adverse effects.We performed MEDLINE searches of English-language literature (1966 to March 2005) using the terms androgen deprivation therapy, hormone treatment, and prostate cancer. We reviewed bibliographies of literature to extract other relevant articles. Studies were selected based on clinical pertinence, with an emphasis on controlled study design.Androgen deprivation therapy is effective for palliation in many patients with advanced prostate cancer and improves outcomes for high-risk

2005 JAMA

793. 20-year outcomes following conservative management of clinically localized prostate cancer. Full Text available with Trip Pro

therapy alone, stratified by age at diagnosis and histological findings.A retrospective population-based cohort study using Connecticut Tumor Registry data supplemented by hospital record and histology review of 767 men aged 55 to 74 years with clinically localized prostate cancer diagnosed between January 1, 1971, and December 31, 1984. Patients were treated with either observation or immediate or delayed androgen withdrawal therapy, with a median observation of 24 years.Probability of mortality from (...) prostate cancer or other competing medical conditions, given a patient's age at diagnosis and tumor grade.The prostate cancer mortality rate was 33 per 1000 person-years during the first 15 years of follow-up (95% confidence interval [CI], 28-38) and 18 per 1000 person-years after 15 years of follow-up (95% CI, 10-29). The mortality rates for these 2 follow-up periods were not statistically different, after adjusting for differences in tumor histology (rate ratio, 1.1; 95% CI, 0.6-1.9). Men with low

2005 JAMA

794. Educational interventions improved some quality of life outcomes in prostate cancer Full Text available with Trip Pro

of the lecture series plus 45 minutes of group discussion facilitated by a clinical psychologist and encouragement to attend lectures with a friend or family member, or usual care (UC) (n = 80). Outcomes: disease specific symptoms (sexual, urinary, and bowel functioning) (UCLA Prostate Cancer Index); patient-rated perceived bother of these outcomes; general health related QOL (physical [PCS] and mental health component scores [MCS] of the SF-36); and depressive symptoms (Center for Epidemiological Studies (...) Educational interventions improved some quality of life outcomes in prostate cancer Educational interventions improved some quality of life outcomes in prostate cancer | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional

2005 Evidence-Based Medicine

795. Randomised phase III study of intravenous vinorelbine plus hormone therapy versus hormone therapy alone in hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Randomised phase III study of intravenous vinorelbine plus hormone therapy versus hormone therapy alone in hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Vinorelbine (VRL) has been shown to be active in hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC) in phase II studies, alone or in combination. Its moderate toxicity profile is well tolerated in elderly patients.Patients with metastatic prostate cancer, progressive after primary hormonal therapy, were randomised to receive intravenous VRL 30 mg/m2 on days 1 (...) -morbidities, and therefore offers an active and safe therapeutic option for patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer.

2005 Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology Controlled trial quality: uncertain

796. Risk of fracture after androgen deprivation for prostate cancer. Full Text available with Trip Pro

of those who received androgen-deprivation therapy had a fracture, as compared with 12.6 percent of those not receiving androgen-deprivation therapy (P<0.001). In the Cox proportional-hazards analyses, adjusted for characteristics of the patient and the tumor, there was a statistically significant relation between the number of doses of gonadotropin-releasing hormone received during the 12 months after diagnosis and the subsequent risk of fracture.Androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer (...) Risk of fracture after androgen deprivation for prostate cancer. The use of androgen-deprivation therapy for prostate cancer has increased substantially over the past 15 years. This treatment is associated with a loss of bone-mineral density, but the risk of fracture after androgen-deprivation therapy has not been well studied.We studied the records of 50,613 men who were listed in the linked database of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program and Medicare as having received

2005 NEJM

797. Low dose rate brachytherapy for localised prostate cancer (IPG132)

remains current, and should be read in conjunction with the clinical guideline. Description Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers in men. It tends to affect older men, with the risk rising with age. It is not a single disease entity but may be indicated form an incidental biopsy finding to presentation with metastatic prostate cancer, which may or may not cause any symptoms or shorten life. Symptoms when they occur include urinary outflow obstruction and features of metastases (...) , such as bone pain. Prognosis with prostate cancer is variable and depends on the grade of the tumour and stage of the diagnosed cancer. Treatment options depend on the stage of the cancer. Current treatments for localised prostate cancer include watchful waiting, radiotherapy, and radical prostatectomy. Metastatic prostate cancer is usually treated with hormone therapy. Brachytherapy is a form of radiotherapy in which delivery of radiation is targeted directly to the prostate gland through the implantation

2005 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Interventional Procedures

798. Cryotherapy for recurrent prostate cancer (IPG119)

guidance on cryotherapy for recurrent prostate cancer remains current, and should be read in conjunction with the clinical guideline. Description This procedure is used to treat carcinoma of the prostate that has been unsuccessfully treated via another method, most typically radiation or hormones. The procedure is performed by inserting cryotherapeutic probes into the prostate gland. These are used to freeze the gland along with cancerous tissue, thus destroying the diseased tissue. Patients (...) Cryotherapy for recurrent prostate cancer (IPG119) Overview | Cryotherapy for recurrent prostate cancer | Guidance | NICE Cryotherapy for recurrent prostate cancer Interventional procedures guidance [IPG119] Published date: May 2005 Share Save Guidance The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has issued full guidance to the NHS in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland on cryotherapy for recurrent prostate cancer in May 2005. Further recommendations have been made

2005 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Interventional Procedures

799. High-intensity focused ultrasound for prostate cancer (IPG118)

High-intensity focused ultrasound for prostate cancer (IPG118) Overview | High-intensity focused ultrasound for prostate cancer | Guidance | NICE High-intensity focused ultrasound for prostate cancer Interventional procedures guidance [IPG118] Published date: March 2005 Share Save Guidance The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has issued full guidance to the NHS in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland on high-intensity focused ultrasound for prostate cancer (...) in March 2005. Further recommendations have been made as part of the clinical guideline on prostate cancer published in February 2008, as follows: High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and cryotherapy are not recommended for men with localised prostate cancer other than in the context of controlled clinical trials comparing their use with established interventions. Clinical and cost-effectiveness evidence was reviewed in the development of this guideline which has led to this more specific

2005 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Interventional Procedures

800. Cryotherapy as a primary treatment for prostate cancer (IPG145)

.- are used as secondary codes to classify interventions that are percutaneous and require some form of image control: if the method of image control is unspecified, Y53.9 Unspecified approach to organ under image control is assigned. In addition the ICD-10 code C61.X Malignant neoplasm of prostate is assigned. Your responsibility This guidance represents the view of NICE, arrived at after careful consideration of the evidence available. When exercising their judgement, healthcare professionals (...) Cryotherapy as a primary treatment for prostate cancer (IPG145) Overview | Cryotherapy as a primary treatment for prostate cancer | Guidance | NICE Cryotherapy as a primary treatment for prostate cancer Interventional procedures guidance [IPG145] Published date: November 2005 Share Save Guidance The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) has issued full guidance to the NHS in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland on cryotherapy as a primary treatment for prostate

2005 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence - Interventional Procedures