Latest & greatest articles for pulmonary embolism

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Top results for pulmonary embolism

261. Value of quantitative D-dimer assays in identifying pulmonary embolism: implications from a sequential decision model Full Text available with Trip Pro

Value of quantitative D-dimer assays in identifying pulmonary embolism: implications from a sequential decision model Value of quantitative D-dimer assays in identifying pulmonary embolism: implications from a sequential decision model Value of quantitative D-dimer assays in identifying pulmonary embolism: implications from a sequential decision model Duriseti R S, Shachter R D, Brandeau M L Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria (...) for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The study examined the use of the quantitative D-dimer assay in evaluating patients for suspected pulmonary embolism (PE). Type of intervention Diagnosis. Economic study type Cost-utility analysis. Study population The study population comprised patients presenting to an urban

2006 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.

262. Pulmonary embolism

HA. Strategy for diagnosis of patients with suspected acute pulmonary embolism. Chest 1993;103(5):1553-59. 4 The British Thoracic Society Standards of Care Committee. Suspected Acute Pulmonary Embolism – a practical approach. Thorax 1997;52(Suppl 4):S2-S24. 5 American College of Chest Physicians: Consensus Committee on Pulmonary Embolism. Opinions regarding the diagnosis and management of venous thromboembolic disease [review]. Chest 1998;113(2):499-504. 6 Wells PS, Anderson DR, Rodger M (...) Pulmonary embolism INTRODUCTION A function of the pulmonary capillary bed is to ?lter the circulation of the minute blood clots that are a daily occurrence in health. Pathological obstruction of the pulmonary vessels usually presents as one of four types: 1. multiple small pulmonary emboli – characterised by progressive breathlessness more commonly identified at outpatients appointments than through emergency presentation due to the long standing nature of the problem 2. segmental emboli

2006 Joint Royal Colleges Ambulance Liaison Committee

263. Review: negative ELISA results are best for excluding a diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism Full Text available with Trip Pro

Review: negative ELISA results are best for excluding a diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism Review: negative ELISA results are best for excluding a diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies, please see our . Log in using your username (...) and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? Search for this keyword Search for this keyword Main menu Log in using your username and password For personal accounts OR managers of institutional accounts Username * Password * your user name or password? You are here Review: negative ELISA results are best for excluding a diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis or pulmonary embolism Article Text Diagnosis Review: negative ELISA results

2005 Evidence-Based Medicine

264. Diagnositic utility of ECG for diagnosing pulmonary embolism

Diagnositic utility of ECG for diagnosing pulmonary embolism BestBets: Diagnostic utility of ECG for diagnosing pulmonary embolism Diagnostic utility of ECG for diagnosing pulmonary embolism Report By: Ged Brown - Specialist Registrar Search checked by Kerstin Hogg - Clinical Research Fellow Institution: Manchester Royal Infirmary Date Submitted: 18th April 2001 Date Completed: 29th September 2005 Last Modified: 20th July 2005 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [a patient (...) presenting with features suggestive of pulmonary embolus] what is [the diagnostic utility of ECG] in [stratifying risk of pulmonary embolus]? Clinical Scenario A thirty year old man presents to the emergency department with a spontaneous onset of atraumatic pleuritic chest pain. He is in a low risk group clinically. The medical registrar suggests that the fact that the ECG is normal makes the diagnosis of pulmonary embolus much less likely. You wonder whether his assertion that a normal ECG will help

2005 BestBETS

265. Review: clinical gestalt strategies and clinical prediction rules have similar discriminate pretest probabilities of pulmonary embolism Full Text available with Trip Pro

Review: clinical gestalt strategies and clinical prediction rules have similar discriminate pretest probabilities of pulmonary embolism Review: clinical gestalt strategies and clinical prediction rules have similar discriminate pretest probabilities of pulmonary embolism | BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine We use cookies to improve our service and to tailor our content and advertising to you. You can manage your cookie settings via your browser at any time. To learn more about how we use cookies (...) of pulmonary embolism Article Text Clinical prediction guide Review: clinical gestalt strategies and clinical prediction rules have similar discriminate pretest probabilities of pulmonary embolism Free Mandeep R Mehra , MD, FACC, FACP Statistics from Altmetric.com Chunilal SD, Eikelboom JW, Attia J, et al. Does this patient have pulmonary embolism? JAMA 2003 ; 290 : 2849 –58. Q In patients with suspected pulmonary embolism, how do clinical prediction rules (using explicit features of clinical examination

2005 Evidence-Based Medicine

266. Systematic review and meta-analysis of strategies for the diagnosis of suspected pulmonary embolism. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Systematic review and meta-analysis of strategies for the diagnosis of suspected pulmonary embolism. To assess the likelihood ratios of diagnostic strategies for pulmonary embolism and to determine their clinical application according to pretest probability.Medline, Embase, and Pascal Biomed and manual search for articles published from January 1990 to September 2003.Studies that evaluated diagnostic tests for confirmation or exclusion of pulmonary embolism. DATA EXTRACTED: Positive likelihood (...) ratios for strategies that confirmed a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism and negative likelihood ratios for diagnostic strategies that excluded a diagnosis of pulmonary embolism.48 of 1012 articles were included. Positive likelihood ratios for diagnostic tests were: high probability ventilation perfusion lung scan 18.3 (95% confidence interval 10.3 to 32.5), spiral computed tomography 24.1 (12.4 to 46.7), and ultrasonography of leg veins 16.2 (5.6 to 46.7). In patients with a moderate or high pretest

2005 BMJ

267. Aspirin in the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism

Aspirin in the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism BestBets: Aspirin in the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism Aspirin in the treatment of acute pulmonary embolism Report By: Caroline Lee - Senior Clinical Fellow Search checked by Craig Ferguson - Clinical Research Fellow Institution: Manchester Royal Infirmary Date Submitted: 2nd November 2004 Date Completed: 18th May 2005 Last Modified: 18th May 2005 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question In [a patient with suspected acute (...) pulmonary embolus] is [aspirin] effective in [reducing morbidity and mortality]? Clinical Scenario A 50 year old woman presents to the emergency department with shortness of breath and pleurtic chest pain, following a flight from Australia. Examination is unremarkable except for tachypnoea and mild hypoxia. CXR is also normal, so you aim to treat for suspected pulmonary embolus. You know that aspirin is used in the treatment of other acute thromboembolic conditions eg CVA or MI, and in the prophylaxis

2005 BestBETS

268. Multidetector-row computed tomography in suspected pulmonary embolism. (Abstract)

Multidetector-row computed tomography in suspected pulmonary embolism. Single-detector-row computed tomography (CT) has a low sensitivity for pulmonary embolism and must be combined with venous-compression ultrasonography of the lower limbs. We evaluated whether the use of D-dimer measurement and multidetector-row CT, without lower-limb ultrasonography, might safely rule out pulmonary embolism.We included 756 consecutive patients with clinically suspected pulmonary embolism from the emergency (...) departments of three teaching hospitals and managed their cases according to a standardized sequential diagnostic strategy. All patients were followed for three months.Pulmonary embolism was detected in 194 of the 756 patients (26 percent). Among the 82 patients with a high clinical probability of pulmonary embolism, multidetector-row CT showed pulmonary embolism in 78, and 1 patient had proximal deep venous thrombosis and a CT scan that was negative for pulmonary embolism. Of the 674 patients without

2005 NEJM

269. Clinical Validity of a Negative Computed Tomography Scan in Patients With Suspected Pulmonary Embolism: A Systematic Review

Clinical Validity of a Negative Computed Tomography Scan in Patients With Suspected Pulmonary Embolism: A Systematic Review PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2005 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club

270. Clinical validity of a negative computed tomography scan in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism: a systematic review. (Abstract)

, CRISP, metaRegister of Controlled Trials, and Cochrane were searched for articles published in the English language from January 1990 to May 2004.We included studies that used contrast-enhanced chest CT to rule out the diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism, had a minimum follow-up of 3 months, and had study populations of more than 30 patients.Two reviewers independently abstracted patient demographics, frequency of venous thromboembolic events (VTEs), CT modality (single-slice CT, multidetector-row (...) CT, or electron-beam CT), false-negative results, and deaths attributable to pulmonary embolism. To calculate the overall negative likelihood ratio (NLR) of a VTE after a negative or inconclusive chest CT scan for pulmonary embolism, we included VTEs that were objectively confirmed by an additional imaging test despite a negative or inconclusive CT scan and objectively confirmed VTEs that occurred during clinical follow-up of at least 3 months.Fifteen studies met the inclusion criteria

2005 JAMA

271. Systematic review and meta-analysis of strategies for the diagnosis of suspected pulmonary embolism

Systematic review and meta-analysis of strategies for the diagnosis of suspected pulmonary embolism Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2005 DARE.

272. Clinical validity of a negative computed tomography scan in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism: a systematic review

Clinical validity of a negative computed tomography scan in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism: a systematic review Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2005 DARE.

273. Ventilation-perfusion scanning and helical CT in suspected pulmonary embolism: meta-analysis of diagnostic performance

Ventilation-perfusion scanning and helical CT in suspected pulmonary embolism: meta-analysis of diagnostic performance Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2005 DARE.

274. Efficacy of thrombolytic agents in the treatment of pulmonary embolism

Efficacy of thrombolytic agents in the treatment of pulmonary embolism Untitled Document The CRD Databases will not be available from 08:00 BST on Friday 4th October until 08:00 BST on Monday 7th October for essential maintenance. We apologise for any inconvenience.

2005 DARE.

275. Incidence of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension after pulmonary embolism. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Incidence of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension after pulmonary embolism. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTPH) is associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. Its incidence after pulmonary embolism and associated risk factors are not well documented.We conducted a prospective, long-term, follow-up study to assess the incidence of symptomatic CTPH in consecutive patients with an acute episode of pulmonary embolism but without prior venous thromboembolism (...) confidence interval, 0.0 to 2.4) at six months, 3.1 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 0.7 to 5.5) at one year, and 3.8 percent (95 percent confidence interval, 1.1 to 6.5) at two years. No cases occurred after two years among the patients with more than two years of follow-up data. The following increased the risk of CTPH: a previous pulmonary embolism (odds ratio, 19.0), younger age (odds ratio, 1.79 per decade), a larger perfusion defect (odds ratio, 2.22 per decile decrement in perfusion

2004 NEJM

276. Pulmonary embolism. (Abstract)

Pulmonary embolism. Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common illness that can cause death and disability. It is difficult to detect because patients present with a wide array of symptoms and signs. The clinical setting can raise suspicion, and certain inherited and acquired risk factors predispose susceptible individuals. D-dimer concentration in blood is the best laboratory screening test, and chest CT has become the most widespread imaging test. Treatment requires rapid and accurate risk

2004 Lancet

277. Meta-analysis: outcomes in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism managed with computed tomographic pulmonary angiography

Meta-analysis: outcomes in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism managed with computed tomographic pulmonary angiography Meta-analysis: outcomes in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism managed with computed tomographic pulmonary angiography Meta-analysis: outcomes in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism managed with computed tomographic pulmonary angiography Moores L K, Jackson W L, Shorr A F, Jackson J L CRD summary The review assessed the safety of withholding anticoagulation (...) therapy in patients with suspected pulmonary embolism and negative results on spiral computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA). The authors concluded that it appeared to be safe to withhold treatment following a negative CTPA result when lower-extremity imaging was performed concurrently. The conclusion appears appropriate based on the evidence presented. Authors' objectives To determine the safety and efficacy of withholding systemic anticoagulation following negative results on computed

2004 DARE.

278. Low-molecular-weight heparin compared with intravenous unfractionated heparin for treatment of pulmonary embolism: a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials

Low-molecular-weight heparin compared with intravenous unfractionated heparin for treatment of pulmonary embolism: a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials Low-molecular-weight heparin compared with intravenous unfractionated heparin for treatment of pulmonary embolism: a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials Low-molecular-weight heparin compared with intravenous unfractionated heparin for treatment of pulmonary embolism: a meta-analysis of randomized, controlled trials Quinlan (...) D J, McQuillan A, Eikelboom J W CRD summary This review reported that fixed-dose low molecular weight heparin appeared to be as effective and safe as dose-adjusted intravenous unfractionated heparin for the initial treatment of nonmassive pulmonary embolism. The authors also found no differences between the treatments in major and minor bleeding, and all-cause mortality. The review was well conducted and the findings are likely to be reliable. Authors' objectives To compare the efficacy

2004 DARE.

279. D-dimer for the exclusion of acute venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism: a systematic review

D-dimer for the exclusion of acute venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism: a systematic review D-dimer for the exclusion of acute venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism: a systematic review D-dimer for the exclusion of acute venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism: a systematic review Stein P D, Hull R D, Patel K C, Olson R E, Ghali W A, Brant R, Biel R K, Bharadia V, Kalra N K CRD summary This review assessed the sensitivity and specificity of D-dimer assays, and the variability (...) of such measures among studies of the diagnosis of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). The authors appropriately concluded that, for excluding PE or DVT, a negative result on quantitative rapid enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay is as diagnostically useful as a normal lung scan or negative duplex ultrasonography finding. Authors' objectives To assess the sensitivity and specificity of the D-dimer assays, and the variability of such measures among studies for the diagnosis of deep venous

2004 DARE.

280. Diagnosis of pulmonary embolism: a cost-effectiveness analysis

Diagnosis of pulmonary embolism: a cost-effectiveness analysis Diagnosis of pulmonary embolism: a cost-effectiveness analysis Diagnosis of pulmonary embolism: a cost-effectiveness analysis Doyle N M, Ramirez M M, Mastrobattista J M, Monga M, Wagner L K, Gardner M O Record Status This is a critical abstract of an economic evaluation that meets the criteria for inclusion on NHS EED. Each abstract contains a brief summary of the methods, the results and conclusions followed by a detailed critical (...) assessment on the reliability of the study and the conclusions drawn. Health technology The study compared three diagnostic strategies for pulmonary embolism (PE) in pregnant women. One strategy was compression ultrasonography, followed by anticoagulation in case of positive results (high probability ventilation-perfusion (VQ) scans) or by VQ scan or spiral computed tomography (CT) in case of negative results. Low probability VQ scans resulted in no treatment, whereas high probability VQ scans resulted

2004 NHS Economic Evaluation Database.