Latest & greatest articles for screening

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on screening or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on screening and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for screening

141. AIM Clinical Appropriateness Guidelines for Genetic Testing for Reproductive Carrier Screening and Prenatal Diagnosis

AIM Clinical Appropriateness Guidelines for Genetic Testing for Reproductive Carrier Screening and Prenatal Diagnosis Appropriate.Safe.Affordable © 2019 AIM Specialty Health 2068-0319b Clinical Appropriateness Guidelines Genetic Testing for Reproductive Carrier Screening and Prenatal Diagnosis EFFECTIVE MARCH 31, 2019 PROPRIETARY Guidelines developed by, and used with permission from, Informed Medical Decisions, Inc. © 2019 Informed Medical Decisions, Inc. All Rights Reserved. 2 Table (...) of Contents Scope 3 Appropriate Use Criteria 3 Carrier Screening for Familial Disease 3 Fragile X 3 Carrier Screening for Common and Ethnic Genetic Diseases 3 Cystic Fibrosis 3 Spinal Muscular Atrophy 4 Hemoglobinopathies 4 Ashkenazi Jewish Carrier Screening 4 Other Ethnicities 5 Carrier Screening Not Clinically Appropriate 5 Preimplantation Genetic Screening and Diagnostic Testing of Embryos 5 Preimplantation Genetic Screening for Common Aneuploidy 6 Prenatal Cell-Free DNA Screening 6 Prenatal Molecular

2019 AIM Specialty Health

142. Predictive performance of the competing risk model in screening for preeclampsia Full Text available with Trip Pro

Predictive performance of the competing risk model in screening for preeclampsia The established method of screening for preeclampsia is to identify risk factors from maternal demographic characteristics and medical history; in the presence of such factors the patient is classified as high risk and in their absence as low risk. However, the performance of such an approach is poor. We developed a competing risks model, which allows combination of maternal factors (age, weight, height, race (...) of the competing risks model in screening for preeclampsia by a combination of maternal factors, mean arterial pressure, uterine artery pulsatility index, and serum placental growth factor, referred to as the triple test, in a training data set for the development of the model and 2 validation studies.The data for this study were derived from 3 previously reported prospective, nonintervention, multicenter screening studies for preeclampsia in singleton pregnancies at 11+0 to 13+6 weeks' gestation. In all 3

2019 EvidenceUpdates

143. Testing behavioral interventions to optimize participation in a population-based colorectal cancer screening program in Catalonia, Spain Full Text available with Trip Pro

Testing behavioral interventions to optimize participation in a population-based colorectal cancer screening program in Catalonia, Spain The aim of the study was to measure the effect of three cost-neutral behavioral interventions on participation compared to the standard invitation letter in a population-based colorectal cancer screening program in 2014. For that purpose, a four-arm randomized field trial was conducted among 5077 individuals aged 50 to 69 years. Over an 8-week period, each (...) week was randomly allocated to the intervention or the control conditions. Individuals assigned to the intervention conditions additionally received a prompt to write down the date to pick up the screening test in a pharmacy. Two of the three intervention groups also included an additional paragraph in the invitation letter on either: 1) the high proportion of individuals participating regularly (social norms condition) or 2) the importance of regular participation (benefit condition). We measured

2019 EvidenceUpdates

144. Screening the Blood Supply for Zika Virus in the 50 U.S. States and Puerto Rico: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. (Abstract)

Screening the Blood Supply for Zika Virus in the 50 U.S. States and Puerto Rico: A Cost-Effectiveness Analysis. In 2016, universal individual donation nucleic acid testing (ID-NAT) of donated blood for Zika virus began in U.S. states and territories.To assess the cost-effectiveness of universal ID-NAT in the first year of screening compared with alternatives for the 50 states and separately for Puerto Rico.Microsimulation that captured Zika-related harms to transfusion recipients, sexual (...) Puerto Rico, MP-NAT exclusively during high mosquito season was cost-effective at $81 123 per QALY (95% CI, -$49 138 to $978 242 per QALY). No screening policy was cost-effective in the 50 states. Universal ID-NAT cost $341 million per QALY (CI, $125 million to $2.90 billion per QALY) compared with no screening in the 50 states.In Puerto Rico, MP-NAT only during the season of high mosquito activity was most cost-effective in 64% of probabilistic sensitivity analysis iterations. In the 50 states

2019 Annals of Internal Medicine

145. Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) prenatal screening for chromosomal aneuploidies

Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) prenatal screening for chromosomal aneuploidies Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) prenatal screening for chromosomal aneuploidies | Washington State Health Care Authority Toggle search Toggle navigation Announcement Menu Apple Health Eligibility Manual Search Close menu Search form Search all of HCA Search Health care services and supports Search Billers, providers, & partners Search Employee & retiree benefits Search About HCA Search Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) prenatal screening (...) for chromosomal aneuploidies Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) prenatal screening for chromosomal aneuploidies Status: Draft findings and decision published. Policy context Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) testing is used for prenatal screening for common chromosome abnormalities. There is uncertainty about the appropriateness of cfDNA screening for some populations, including those at low risk for common fetal genetic abnormalities. This topic was selected for a health technology assessment because of medium concerns

2019 Washington Health Care Authority

146. Effectiveness of intermittent screening and treatment for the control of malaria in pregnancy: a cluster randomised trial in India. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Effectiveness of intermittent screening and treatment for the control of malaria in pregnancy: a cluster randomised trial in India. The control of malaria in pregnancy (MiP) in India relies on testing women who present with symptoms or signs suggestive of malaria. We hypothesised that intermittent screening and treatment for malaria at each antenatal care visit (ISTp) would improve on this approach and reduce the adverse effects of MiP.A cluster randomised controlled trial comparing ISTp versus (...) passive case detection (PCD) was conducted in Jharkhand state. Pregnant women of all parities with a gestational age of 18-28 weeks were enrolled. Women in the ISTp group were screened with a rapid diagnostic test (RDT) for malaria at each antenatal clinic visit and those in the PCD group were screened only if they had symptoms or signs suggestive of malaria. All RDT positive women were treated with artesunate/sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine. The primary endpoint was placental malaria, determined

2019 BMJ global health Controlled trial quality: predicted high

147. Public health guidance on screening and vaccination for infectious diseases in newly arrived migrants within the EU/EEA

Public health guidance on screening and vaccination for infectious diseases in newly arrived migrants within the EU/EEA SCIENTIFIC ADVICE Public health guidance on screening and vaccination for infectious diseases in newly arrived migrants within the EU/EEA www.ecdc.europa.euECDC SCIENTIFIC ADVICE Public health guidance on screening and vaccination for infectious diseases in newly arrived migrants within the EU/EEA ii This report from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC (...) Prevention and Control. Public health guidance on screening and vaccination for infectious diseases in newly arrived migrants within the EU/EEA. Stockholm: ECDC; 2018. Stockholm, November 2018 ISBN 978-92-9498-280-3 doi: 10.2900/154411 Catalogue number TQ-04-18-919-EN-N © European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, 2018 Reproduction is authorised, provided the source is acknowledged. SCIENTIFIC ADVICE Public health guidance on screening and vaccination for infectious diseases in newly arrived

2019 European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control - Public Health Guidance

148. Avioq htlv-i/ii microelisa system - for use in screening individual human donors, including volunteer donors of whole blood and blood components, and other living donors for the presence of anti-HTLV-I/HTLV-II, and for use as an aid in clinical diagnosis

Avioq htlv-i/ii microelisa system - for use in screening individual human donors, including volunteer donors of whole blood and blood components, and other living donors for the presence of anti-HTLV-I/HTLV-II, and for use as an aid in clinical diagnosis Search Page - Drug and Health Product Register Language selection Search and menus Search Search website Search Topics menu You are here: Summary Basis of Decision - - Health Canada Expand all Summary Basis of Decision (SBD) for Contact

2019 Health Canada - Drug and Health Product Register

149. Results of Prostate Cancer Screening in a Unique Cohort at 19yr of Follow-up (Abstract)

Results of Prostate Cancer Screening in a Unique Cohort at 19yr of Follow-up We assessed the effect of screening in the European Randomized study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC) Rotterdam pilot 1 study cohort with men randomized in 1991-1992. A total of 1134 men were randomized on a 1:1 basis to a screening (S) and control (C) arm after prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing (PSA ≥10.0ng/ml was excluded from randomization). Further PSA testing was offered to all men in the S-arm (...) with 4-yr intervals starting at age 55yr and screened up to the age of 74yr. Overall, a PSA level of ≥3.0ng/ml triggered biopsy. At time of analysis, 63% of men had died. Overall relative risk of metastatic (M+) disease and prostate cancer (PCa) death was 0.46 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.19-1.11) and 0.48 (95% CI: 0.17-1.36), respectively, in favor of screening. This ERSPC Rotterdam pilot 1 study cohort, screened in a period without noteworthy contamination, shows that PSA-based screening could

2019 EvidenceUpdates

150. Bowel screening

Bowel screening Bowel screening - NICE CKS Share Bowel screening: Summary The NHS Bowel Cancer Screening Programme aims to identify bowel cancer at an early stage when treatment is more likely to be successful. In Scotland, screening is offered every two years to people aged 50–74 years. In England, Wales and Northern Ireland screening is offered every two years to people aged 60–74 years. In some areas of England, one-off flexible sigmoidoscopy (Bowelscope) screening is offered to people aged (...) 55 years. In 2016 the UK National Screening Committee recommended that faecal immunochemical testing (FIT) should replace guaiac faecal occult blood testing (gFOBt) as the primary screening test for bowel cancer screening. FIT replaced gFOBt in Scotland in 2017 and will be introduced in England and Wales in 2019, gFOBt remains the primary test in Northern Ireland. An invitation letter followed by a faecal occult blood test kit is sent to participants’ home address. FIT testing — the end of a test

2019 NICE Clinical Knowledge Summaries

151. Cost-effectiveness of community-based screening and treatment of moderate acute malnutrition in Mali. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Cost-effectiveness of community-based screening and treatment of moderate acute malnutrition in Mali. Moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) causes substantial child morbidity and mortality, accounting for 4.4% of deaths and 6.0% of disability-adjusted life years (DALY) lost among children under 5 each year. There is growing consensus on the need to provide appropriate treatment of MAM, both to reduce associated morbidity and mortality and to halt its progression to severe acute malnutrition. We

2019 BMJ global health Controlled trial quality: uncertain

152. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection: Screening

Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection: Screening Recommendation | United States Preventive Services Taskforce Toggle navigation Main navigation Main navigation Recommendation Pregnant persons The USPSTF recommends that clinicians screen for HIV infection in all pregnant persons, including those who present in labor or at delivery whose HIV status is unknown. A Adolescents and adults aged 15 to 65 years The USPSTF recommends that clinicians screen for HIV infection in adolescents (...) and adults aged 15 to 65 years. Younger adolescents and older adults who are at increased risk of infection should also be screened. A View the Clinical Summary in Population Adolescents and adults aged 15 to 65 years Pregnant Persons Recommendation Screen for HIV infection. Grade: A Screen for HIV infection. Grade: A Risk Assessment Although all adolescents and adults aged 15 to 65 years should be screened, there are a number of risk factors that increase risk. Among adolescents younger than 15 years

2019 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

153. Elevated Blood Lead Levels in Children and Pregnant Women: Screening

Elevated Blood Lead Levels in Children and Pregnant Women: Screening Recommendation | United States Preventive Services Taskforce Toggle navigation Main navigation Main navigation Recommendation Pregnant persons The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for elevated blood lead levels in asymptomatic pregnant persons. I Children 5 years and younger The USPSTF concludes that the current evidence is insufficient (...) to assess the balance of benefits and harms of screening for elevated blood lead levels in asymptomatic children. I View the Clinical Summary in Population Children 5 years and younger and pregnant persons Recommendation No recommendation. Grade: I (insufficient evidence) Screening Tests Elevated blood lead levels can be detected by measuring capillary or venous blood lead levels. Capillary blood testing is recommended for initial screening. Patients with positive screening results from capillary blood

2019 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

154. Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Screening

Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm: Screening Recommendation | United States Preventive Services Taskforce Toggle navigation Main navigation Main navigation Recommendation Men aged 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked The USPSTF recommends 1-time screening for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) with ultrasonography in men aged 65 to 75 years who have ever smoked. B Men aged 65 to 75 years who have never smoked The USPSTF recommends that clinicians selectively offer screening for AAA with ultrasonography (...) in men aged 65 to 75 years who have never smoked rather than routinely screening all men in this group. Evidence indicates that the net benefit of screening all men in this group is small. In determining whether this service is appropriate in individual cases, patients and clinicians should consider the balance of benefits and harms on the basis of evidence relevant to the patient's medical history, family history, other risk factors, and personal values. C Women who have never smoked The USPSTF

2019 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

155. Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Adults: Screening

Asymptomatic Bacteriuria in Adults: Screening Recommendation | United States Preventive Services Taskforce Toggle navigation Main navigation Main navigation Recommendation Pregnant persons The USPSTF recommends screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria using urine culture in pregnant persons. B Nonpregnant adults The USPSTF recommends against screening for asymptomatic bacteriuria in nonpregnant adults. D View the Clinical Summary in What does the USPSTF recommend? For pregnant persons: Grade B (...) Screen persons who are pregnant for asymptomatic bacteriuria with a urine culture. For nonpregnant adults: Grade D Do not screen adults who are not pregnant for asymptomatic bacteriuria. To whom does this recommendation apply? This applies to adults 18 years and older and pregnant persons of any age without signs and symptoms of a urinary tract infection. It does not apply to persons who have chronic medical or urinary tract conditions or are hospitalized or living in institutions such as nursing

2019 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

156. Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Pregnant Women: Screening

Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Pregnant Women: Screening Recommendation | United States Preventive Services Taskforce Toggle navigation Main navigation Main navigation Recommendation Pregnant women The USPSTF recommends screening for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in pregnant women at their first prenatal visit A View the Clinical Summary in Population Pregnant Persons Recommendation Screen for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. Grade: A Risk Assessment In the United States, new cases of HBV (...) among adults are largely transmitted through injection drug use or sexual intercourse, but most prevalent cases of HBV infection are chronic infections from exposure occurring in infancy or childhood. Another major risk factor for HBV infection is country of origin. In the United States, adults with HBV born in high-prevalence countries were commonly infected during childhood. In children, the primary source of infection is perinatal transmission at birth. Screening Tests The principal screening

2019 U.S. Preventive Services Task Force

157. Cell-free DNA to Screen for Single-Gene Disorders

Cell-free DNA to Screen for Single-Gene Disorders Cell-free DNA to Screen for Single-Gene Disorders | ACOG Clinical Guidance Journals & Publications Patient Education Topics Featured Clinical Topics Hi, Featured Clinical Topics Clinical Guidance Cell-free DNA to Screen for Single-Gene Disorders Practice Advisory February 2019 Jump to Resources Share By reading this page you agree to ACOG's Terms and Conditions. . The application of cell-free DNA technology for Rh disease and the current

2019 American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

158. 2019 ASCCP Risk-Based Management Consensus Guidelines for Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Tests and Cancer Precursors Full Text available with Trip Pro

2019 ASCCP Risk-Based Management Consensus Guidelines for Abnormal Cervical Cancer Screening Tests and Cancer Precursors 2019 ASCCP Risk-Based Management Consensus Guidelines for Ab... : Journal of Lower Genital Tract Disease ')} You may be trying to access this site from a secured browser on the server. Please enable scripts and reload this page. Your account has been temporarily locked Your account has been temporarily locked due to incorrect sign in attempts and will be automatically (...) in the development of these guidelines . The corresponding authors had final responsibility for the submission decision. The National Cancer Institute (including M.S. and N.W.) receives cervical screening results at reduced or no cost from commercial research partners (Qiagen, Roche, BD, MobileODT, Arbor Vita) for independent evaluations of screening methods and strategies. A.-B.M. is an advisory board member of Merck and GSK. R.S.G. is an ASCCP consultant of Inovio Pharmaceuticals DSMB. W.K.H. is connected

2019 American Society for Clinical Pathology

159. Outcomes of Prostate-specific Antigen-based Prostate Cancer Screening Among Men Using Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs. (Abstract)

Outcomes of Prostate-specific Antigen-based Prostate Cancer Screening Among Men Using Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs. The Finnish Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (FinRSPC), the largest component of the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer (ERSPC), showed a smaller, nonsignificant reduction in prostate cancer-specific mortality by systematic prostate-specific antigen (PSA)-based screening compared with the overall ERSPC results. Nonsteroidal anti (...) -inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) reduce inflammation and also PSA elevations due to intraprostatic inflammation.To explore whether NSAID usage modifies the effects of PSA-based screening on prostate cancer incidence and mortality.A cohort of 78 165 men from the FinRSPC were linked to a comprehensive national prescription database to obtain information on NSAID reimbursements prior to screening.Prostate cancer risk and mortality were compared between the FinRSPC screening arm and the control arm among NSAID

2018 European urology focus

160. Screening for Colorectal Cancer

Screening for Colorectal Cancer CLINICAL PRACTICE GUIDELINE Clinical Practice Guideline on Screening for Colorectal Cancer in Individuals With a Family History of Nonhereditary Colorectal Cancer or Adenoma: The Canadian Association of Gastroenterology Banff Consensus Desmond Leddin, 1,2, * David A. Lieberman, 3, * Frances Tse, 4 Alan N. Barkun, 5 Ahmed M. Abou-Setta, 6 John K. Marshall, 4 N. Jewel Samadder, 7 Harminder Singh, 6,8 Jennifer J. Telford, 9 Jill Tinmouth, 10 Anna N. Wilkinson, 11 (...) Department of Family Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada BACKGROUND & AIMS: A family history (FH) of colorectal cancer (CRC) increases the risk of developing CRC. These consensus recommendations developed by the Canadian As- sociation of Gastroenterology and endorsed by the American Gastroenterological Association, aim to provide guidance on screening these high-risk individuals. METHODS: Multiple parallel systematic review streams, informed by 10 literature searches, assembled

2018 Canadian Association of Gastroenterology