Latest & greatest articles for sedation

The Trip Database is a leading resource to help health professionals find trustworthy answers to their clinical questions. Users can access the latest research evidence and guidance to answer their clinical questions. We have a large collection of systematic reviews, clinical guidelines, regulatory guidance, clinical trials and many other forms of evidence. If you wanted the latest trusted evidence on sedation or other clinical topics then use Trip today.

This page lists the very latest high quality evidence on sedation and also the most popular articles. Popularity measured by the number of times the articles have been clicked on by fellow users in the last twelve months.

What is Trip?

Trip is a clinical search engine designed to allow users to quickly and easily find and use high-quality research evidence to support their practice and/or care.

Trip has been online since 1997 and in that time has developed into the internet’s premier source of evidence-based content. Our motto is ‘Find evidence fast’ and this is something we aim to deliver for every single search.

As well as research evidence we also allow clinicians to search across other content types including images, videos, patient information leaflets, educational courses and news.

For further information on Trip click on any of the questions/sections on the left-hand side of this page. But if you still have questions please contact us via jon.brassey@tripdatabase.com

Top results for sedation

81. Guidance on the provision of anaesthesia services for sedation 2015

Guidance on the provision of anaesthesia services for sedation 2015 Document Store | The Royal College of Anaesthetists User menu Search Document Store This page displays listings of ALL publications added to the site. You can narrow down the list by entering keywords in the 'Search' field, and selecting 'Apply'. To filter the publications by section, tick the check-boxes of the desired sections, and select 'Apply'. You can set the ordering of the results by the publication title

2015 Royal College of Anaesthetists

82. Standards for Conscious Sedation in the Provision of Dental Care

Standards for Conscious Sedation in the Provision of Dental Care Standards for Conscious Sedation in the Provision of Dental Care The dental faculties of the royal colleges of surgeons and the Royal College of Anaesthetists 2015 Report of the Intercollegiate Advisory Committee for Sedation in Dentistry2 Executive summary 03 Committee members 04 Foreword 06 Introduction 07 Options for care 08 Preparation for sedation 10 Consent for treatment 10 Patient information 11 Fasting 12 Clinical (...) environment for sedation 13 Nature of the clinical team for sedation 14 Techniques of sedation 15 Essential principles of safe sedation practice 15 Specific techniques 16 Peri-operative care 18 Monitoring 18 Complications 18 Recovery, discharge and aftercare 19 Clinical governance and audit 20 Education and training 21 Sections Section 1: Care pathways 23 Section 2: Clinical sedation techniques 25 Section 3: Peri-operative care 30 Section 4: Patient information 32 Section 5: Education and training 34

2015 Royal College of Anaesthetists

83. Protocolized Sedation vs Usual Care in Pediatric Patients Mechanically Ventilated for Acute Respiratory Failure: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Protocolized Sedation vs Usual Care in Pediatric Patients Mechanically Ventilated for Acute Respiratory Failure: A Randomized Clinical Trial PEDSCCM.org Criteria abstracted from series in Review Posted: founded 1995 Questions or comments?

2015 PedsCCM Evidence-Based Journal Club

84. The use of propofol for procedural sedation in emergency departments. Full Text available with Trip Pro

The use of propofol for procedural sedation in emergency departments. There is increasing evidence that propofol is efficacious and safe for procedural sedation (PS) in the emergency department (ED) setting. However, propofol has a narrow therapeutic window and lacks of a reversal agent. The aim of this review was to cohere the evidence base regarding the efficacy and safety profile of propofol when used in the ED setting for PS.To identify and evaluate all randomized controlled trials (RCTs

2015 Cochrane

85. Deep Sedation and General Anaesthesia in Young Children

Deep Sedation and General Anaesthesia in Young Children Disclaimer: The Rapid Response Service is an information service for those involved in planning and providing health care in Canada. Rapid responses are based on a limited literature search and are not comprehensive, systematic reviews. The intent is to provide a list of sources of the best evidence on the topic that CADTH could identify using all reasonable efforts within the time allowed. Rapid responses should be considered along (...) . It may not be copied, posted on a web site, redistributed by email or stored on an electronic system without the prior written permission of CADTH or applicable copyright owner. Links: This report may contain links to other information available on the websites of third parties on the Internet. CADTH does not have control over the content of such sites. Use of third party sites is governed by the owners’ own terms and conditions. TITLE: Deep Sedation and General Anaesthesia in Young Children: Safety

2015 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

86. The use of bispectral index monitoring (BIS) in conscious sedation

The use of bispectral index monitoring (BIS) in conscious sedation BestBets: The use of bispectral index monitoring (BIS) in conscious sedation The use of bispectral index monitoring (BIS) in conscious sedation Report By: Alexia Williams - Emergency Medicine ST6 Search checked by Dr Abdo Sattout - Consultant in Emergency Medicine Institution: University Hospital Aintree, Merseyside, UK Date Submitted: 20th September 2014 Date Completed: 6th May 2015 Last Modified: 6th May 2015 Status: Green (...) (complete) Three Part Question In [adult patients requiring conscious sedation in the Emergency Department] does the use of [bispectral index monitoring] improve [safety]? Clinical Scenario A 25-year-old man presents to the emergency department (ED) with a fracture dislocation of his ankle. His ankle needs reducing, and you intend to use conscious sedation to facilitate this. You wonder whether bispectral index monitoring (BIS) would help achieve an appropriate level of sedation, thereby reducing

2015 BestBETS

87. Protocolized sedation vs usual care in pediatric patients mechanically ventilated for acute respiratory failure: a randomized clinical trial. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Protocolized sedation vs usual care in pediatric patients mechanically ventilated for acute respiratory failure: a randomized clinical trial. Protocolized sedation improves clinical outcomes in critically ill adults, but its effect in children is unknown.To determine whether critically ill children managed with a nurse-implemented, goal-directed sedation protocol experience fewer days of mechanical ventilation than patients receiving usual care.Cluster randomized trial conducted in 31 US (...) pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). A total of 2449 children (mean age, 4.7 years; range, 2 weeks to 17 years) mechanically ventilated for acute respiratory failure were enrolled in 2009-2013 and followed up until 72 hours after opioids were discontinued, 28 days, or hospital discharge.Intervention PICUs (17 sites; n = 1225 patients) used a protocol that included targeted sedation, arousal assessments, extubation readiness testing, sedation adjustment every 8 hours, and sedation weaning. Control

2015 JAMA Controlled trial quality: predicted high

88. Palliative pharmacological sedation for terminally ill adults. Full Text available with Trip Pro

Palliative pharmacological sedation for terminally ill adults. Terminally ill people experience a variety of symptoms in the last hours and days of life, including delirium, agitation, anxiety, terminal restlessness, dyspnoea, pain, vomiting, and psychological and physical distress. In the terminal phase of life, these symptoms may become refractory, and unable to be controlled by supportive and palliative therapies specifically targeted to these symptoms. Palliative sedation therapy is one (...) potential solution to providing relief from these refractory symptoms. Sedation in terminally ill people is intended to provide relief from refractory symptoms that are not controlled by other methods. Sedative drugs such as benzodiazepines are titrated to achieve the desired level of sedation; the level of sedation can be easily maintained and the effect is reversible.To assess the evidence for the benefit of palliative pharmacological sedation on quality of life, survival, and specific refractory

2015 Cochrane

89. Dexmedetomidine for Sedation in the ICU or PICU

Dexmedetomidine for Sedation in the ICU or PICU TITLE: Dexmedetomidine for Sedation in the ICU or PICU: A Review of Cost- Effectiveness and Guidelines DATE: 17 December 2014 CONTEXT AND POLICY ISSUES Sedation of ICU patients is often essential for ICU patients to maximize survival, reduce ICU and hospital stay, and facilitate mechanical ventilation. 1 The standard of care for sedation includes benzodiazepine sedatives and propofol. 1 These sedatives (notably benzodiazepines) are associated (...) with an increased risk of agitation and delirium. 1 It has been hypothesized that dexmedetomidine would be an appropriate alternative to traditional sedatives for maintaining light to moderate sedation. Dexmedetomidine is an alpha 2 -adrenergic agonist, and it is approved in Canada for intensive care unit sedation and conscious sedation. 2 In January 2014, the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH) reviewed the evidence on the clinical effectiveness of using dexmedetomidine for sedation

2015 Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health - Rapid Review

90. ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Refractory Symptoms at the End of Life and the Use of Palliative Sedation

ESMO Clinical Practice Guidelines for the Management of Refractory Symptoms at the End of Life and the Use of Palliative Sedation ESMOClinicalPracticeGuidelinesforthemanagement ofrefractorysymptomsattheendoflifeandtheuseof palliativesedation † N.I.Cherny 1 ,onbehalfoftheESMOGuidelinesWorkingGroup * 1 DepartmentofMedicalOncology,ShaareZedekMedicalCenter,Jerusalem,Israel Levelofevidencestatement: Since there are no randomised studies addressing this issue, all assertions are level V based on case (...) with routine measures, and that sedation may be needed to attain adequaterelief[26]. epidemiologyofrefractorysymptomsattheend oflife Among patients with advanced cancer, clinical experience sug- gests that optimal palliative care can effectively manage the symptoms of most cancer patients during most of the course of the disease. Although physical and psychological symptoms † ApprovedbytheESMOGuidelinesWorkingGroup:July2014. *Correspondence to: ESMO Guidelines Working Group, ESMO Head Of?ce, Via L. Taddei

2014 European Society for Medical Oncology

91. Dexmedetomidine for sedation of patients in the ICU or PICU: review of clinical effectiveness and safety

Dexmedetomidine for sedation of patients in the ICU or PICU: review of clinical effectiveness and safety Dexmedetomidine for sedation of patients in the ICU or PICU: review of clinical effectiveness and safety Dexmedetomidine for sedation of patients in the ICU or PICU: review of clinical effectiveness and safety CADTH Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made (...) for the HTA database. Citation CADTH. Dexmedetomidine for sedation of patients in the ICU or PICU: review of clinical effectiveness and safety. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). Rapid Response - Summary with Critical Appraisal. 2014 Authors' conclusions Four meta-analyses, one systematic review, and five randomized-controlled trials were included in this review. The available evidence indicates the use of dexmedetomidine was associated with decreased ICU stay

2014 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

92. A Patient-Blinded Randomized, Controlled Trial Comparing Air Insufflation, Water Immersion, and Water Exchange During Minimally Sedated Colonoscopy (Abstract)

A Patient-Blinded Randomized, Controlled Trial Comparing Air Insufflation, Water Immersion, and Water Exchange During Minimally Sedated Colonoscopy Minimal sedation obviates patient recovery burdens, but intolerable pain limits success of cecal intubation. Painless or minimally uncomfortable insertion ensures success of cecal intubation, current patient satisfaction, and willingness to repeat future colonoscopy with minimal sedation. Water immersion (WI) and water exchange (WE), when separately (...) compared with air insufflation (AI), significantly reduced insertion pain. To assess comparative effectiveness, we conducted a randomized controlled trial with head-to-head comparison of these three methods. We hypothesized that WE could produce the highest proportion of patients reporting painless insertion.This prospective patient-blinded trial (NCT01535326) enrolled minimally sedated (25 mg intramuscular meperidine) patients randomized to AI, WI, or WE (90 patients/group) to aid insertion

2014 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: predicted high

93. Opioid-induced sedation scales

Opioid-induced sedation scales Opioid-induced sedation scales Opioid-induced sedation scales Leas B, Betesh J Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Leas B, Betesh J. Opioid-induced sedation scales. Philadelphia: Center for Evidence-based Practice (CEP). 2014 Final publication URL Indexing Status Subject indexing assigned by CRD MeSH Analgesics, Opioids

2014 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

94. Are patients who have used chewing gum at an increased risk of aspiration during sedation?

Are patients who have used chewing gum at an increased risk of aspiration during sedation? BestBets: Are patients who have used chewing gum at an increased risk of aspiration during sedation? Are patients who have used chewing gum at an increased risk of aspiration during sedation? Report By: Dr Tom Jaconelli - ST3 Emergency Medicine Search checked by Dr Will Townend - Consultant in Emergency Medicine Institution: Hull Royal Infirmary Date Submitted: 28th November 2013 Date Completed: 30th (...) April 2014 Last Modified: 30th April 2014 Status: Green (complete) Three Part Question Can[patients considered for procedural sedation in the emergency department]who have [chewed chewing gum in the preceding six hours] be [deemed fasted]? Clinical Scenario A 37 year old male presents with an anterior shoulder dislocation following a rugby match. He states he has not ingested solids for 6 hours or fluids for 2 hours. As you are consenting him for procedural sedation you notice he is chewing gum

2014 BestBETS

95. Propofol sedation for flexible bronchoscopy: a randomised, noninferiority trial Full Text available with Trip Pro

Propofol sedation for flexible bronchoscopy: a randomised, noninferiority trial Propofol has been established as a reliable method for sedation in flexible bronchoscopy. There are no data comparing propofol administered as intravenous boluses versus continuous infusion. 702 consecutive patients undergoing flexible bronchoscopy were randomly allocated to receive intravenous propofol using either an intermittent bolus technique or a continuous infusion. The primary end-point was the number

2014 EvidenceUpdates Controlled trial quality: uncertain

96. The cost-effectiveness of clinic-based chloral hydrate sedation versus general anaesthesia for paediatric ophthalmological procedures

The cost-effectiveness of clinic-based chloral hydrate sedation versus general anaesthesia for paediatric ophthalmological procedures The cost-effectiveness of clinic-based chloral hydrate sedation versus general anaesthesia for paediatric ophthalmological procedures The cost-effectiveness of clinic-based chloral hydrate sedation versus general anaesthesia for paediatric ophthalmological procedures Burnett H, Lambley R, West S, Ungar WJ, Mireskandari K Record Status This is a bibliographic (...) record of a published health technology assessment. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation Burnett H, Lambley R, West S, Ungar WJ, Mireskandari K. The cost-effectiveness of clinic-based chloral hydrate sedation versus general anaesthesia for paediatric ophthalmological procedures. Toronto: Technology Assessment at SickKids (TASK). 2014 Authors' objectives The primary objective was to determine the incremental cost of paediatric eye examinations

2014 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

97. Dexmedetomidine for sedation in the ICU or PICU: a review of cost-effectiveness and guidelines

Dexmedetomidine for sedation in the ICU or PICU: a review of cost-effectiveness and guidelines Dexmedetomidine for sedation in the ICU or PICU: a review of cost-effectiveness and guidelines Dexmedetomidine for sedation in the ICU or PICU: a review of cost-effectiveness and guidelines CADTH Record Status This is a bibliographic record of a published health technology assessment from a member of INAHTA. No evaluation of the quality of this assessment has been made for the HTA database. Citation (...) CADTH. Dexmedetomidine for sedation in the ICU or PICU: a review of cost-effectiveness and guidelines. Ottawa: Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health (CADTH). Rapid Response. 2014 Authors' conclusions Six economic evaluations and two guidelines were included in this review. All except one economic study showed that dexmedetomidine was associated with lower ICU and hospital costs. However, the clinical benefits were marginal and not consistent in the included studies. The included

2014 Health Technology Assessment (HTA) Database.

98. Guidelines on Sedation and/or Analgesia for Diagnostic and Interventional Medical, Dental or Surgical Procedures Background Paper

Guidelines on Sedation and/or Analgesia for Diagnostic and Interventional Medical, Dental or Surgical Procedures Background Paper PS09 BP 2014 Page 1 PS09 BP 2014 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Guidelines on Sedation and/or Analgesia for Diagnostic and Interventional Medical, Dental or Surgical Procedures Background Paper PURPOSE OF REVIEW Sedation and/or analgesia are commonly employed for medical, dental and surgical procedures by a range of health practitioners (...) with diverse qualifications and training, including anaesthetists, other medical practitioners and dentists. The goal of ANZCA professional document PS09 Guidelines on Sedation and/or Analgesia for Diagnostic and Interventional Medical, Dental or Surgical Procedures is to support uniform standards for high quality and safe administration of procedural sedation and/or analgesia by all appropriately qualified health practitioners in Australia and New Zealand. The document was last reviewed in 2010

2014 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

99. Guidelines on Sedation and/or Analgesia for Diagnostic and Interventional Medical, Dental or Surgical Procedures

Guidelines on Sedation and/or Analgesia for Diagnostic and Interventional Medical, Dental or Surgical Procedures PS09 2014 Page 1 PS09 2014 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Faculty of Pain Medicine The following organisations have endorsed this document: Australasian College for Emergency Medicine College of Intensive Care Medicine of Australia and New Zealand Gastroenterological Society of Australia New Zealand Society for Gastroenterology Royal Australasian College (...) of Surgeons Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists Guidelines on Sedation and/or Analgesia for Diagnostic and Interventional Medical, Dental or Surgical Procedures This document is intended to apply wherever procedural sedation and/or analgesia for diagnostic and interventional medical, dental and surgical procedures are administered, but excludes situations where sedation is used for longer term management of patients

2014 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists

100. Guidelines on Sedation and/or Analgesia for Diagnostic and Interventional Medical, Dental or Surgical Procedures

Guidelines on Sedation and/or Analgesia for Diagnostic and Interventional Medical, Dental or Surgical Procedures PS09 2014 Page 1 PS09 2014 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists (ANZCA) Faculty of Pain Medicine The following organisations have endorsed this document: Gastroenterological Society of Australia Royal Australasian College of Surgeons Australasian College for Emergency Medicine College of Intensive Care Medicine of Australia and New Zealand Royal Australian and New (...) Zealand College of Radiologists Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists Guidelines on Sedation and/or Analgesia for Diagnostic and Interventional Medical, Dental or Surgical Procedures This document is intended to apply wherever procedural sedation and/or analgesia for diagnostic and interventional medical, dental and surgical procedures are administered, but excludes situations where sedation is used for longer term management of patients such as in intensive care units

2014 Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists